World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
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Travel Tales:
True Stories from First-Time International Travelers

September 18, 2014

Join us for an exciting evening of live storytelling by young people from throughout the Pittsburgh community who had the opportunity to travel abroad during the summer after their Junior year of high school. The most recent cohort of 2014 Global Travel Scholars will be joined by several past participants to reflect on their experience as a first-time traveler outside of the country and on the impact it has had.

Click for Details!

KQV Global Press Conference
Understanding the Global Energy Market

September 20, 2014

This half-hour radio program will feature Karen Harbert, President and CEO, Institute for 21st Century Energy Institute, U.S. Chamber of Commerce.She will discuss "Understanding the Global Energy Market” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Click for Details!

KQV Global Press Conference
Climate Change: An Unconventional Threat to National Security

September 21, 2014

This half-hour radio program will feature Dr. David Titley, Retired Rear Admiral with the US Navy and Director of the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at Pennsylvania State University. He will discuss "Climate Change: An Unconventional Threat to National Security” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

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Program Calendar

You can view programs by month by using the drop-down menu below.

A Closer Look at Nepal
A Closer Look at Nepal
Videoconference

Anil Parajuli
Co-Founder, Vice President, and Nepal Program Coordinator
Himalayan HealthCare

September 23, 2013

1:30 - 2:15 p.m.

Hosted by Pine-Richland High School

Bordered by India and China (Tibet), Nepal is home to Mount Everest, the “roof of the world.” It is also one of the poorest countries in Asia. Nepal’s decade-long civil war left tens of thousands of people dead, and even more displaced. Addressing these struggles and working to provide sustainable development in remote reaches of his country, Mr. Parajuli will provide students with insights into daily life in Nepal, Nepal’s political and social struggles, and sustainable solutions. Students participating in this videoconference will have the opportunity engage in discussion with Mr. Parajuli.

Anil Parajuli is the Co-founder, Vice President, and Coordinator of Himalayan HealthCare (HHC), a nonprofit established to create sustainable development programs in the remote areas of Nepal that has improved the quality of life for its people. He has over twenty years of experience working in villages on projects in health care, community education, and income generation. In accordance with the goals of HHC, Mr. Parajuli was instrumental in establishing the Dr. Megh Bahadur Parajuli Community Hospital in eastern Nepal, a hospital that continues to serve several hundred thousand people on an ongoing basis. He also organized and led countless medical and dental treks though the mountainous regions of Nepal. In 2001, Mr. Parajuli was named an Ashoka Fellow in recognition for his work with HHC. Mr. Parajuli was also named Social Entrepreneur of the Year for 2003-2004 at the Boss Business Excellence Awards and one of the Top 50 Personalities in Nepal from 2004 to 2007.

Videoconference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register. 

Questions?
Please call Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or email amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

WorldQuest 2014
WorldQuest
11th Annual International Trivia Competition

Hosted by:
WTAE’s Sally Wiggin and Essential Pittsburgh 90.5 WESA’s Paul Guggenheimer

October 27, 2014

Doors open at 5:45 pm. Competition begins at 6:30!

Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Register Now!

Join us for a fun evening of food, drinks, prizes, unique networking opportunities, and friendly competition. Show off your knowledge of the world and help support the work of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Once again, WorldQuest will be held at the Cabaret Theater in Pittsburgh’s Cultural District. This annual event provides an informal opportunity for people throughout the Pittsburgh community to test their knowledge about international affairs. Small teams of four will compete for prizes. In addition, players and observers in the "cheering section" will have an opportunity to enter a raffle to win exciting prizes! All proceeds for this event go to support the Council’s more than 200 annual events reaching the region’s secondary schools and professional community.

Raffles and Prizes!
Stay tuned for prize and raffle lists!

Start Studying Now!
Use this link for past WorldQuest questions and answers.

Not interested in competing? Why don’t you come and cheer on the competitors? Just like last year, you can watch WorldQuest from the “Cheering Section” and support a team of your choice.

  • Team of 4: $140
  • Single Competitor: $35 (Those registered as single competitors will be placed in teams of 4 on the day of the competition).
  • Cheering Section: $35

Dinner included in the ticket price. Cash bar.

When registering a team, please include the team name, identify the team captain, and include the names of the other team members. Pre-payment is required for all players and teams.

Click here to play!

WorldQuest Sponsorship and Donor Opportunities

We are looking for sponsors who will also field one or more teams. This year's sponsorship opportunities include:

Bronze: $500

  • One team of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage

Silver: $1,000

  • Two teams of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 2 to the “Cheering Section.”
  • Four seats at an upcoming World Affairs Council Breakfast Briefing or Political Salon

Gold: $2,000

  • Two teams of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 4 to the “Cheering Section.”
  • Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.
  • One 2015 World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh Corporate membership (valued at $1,000).

Please contact Elizabeth Cook, at 412-281-1259, or email elizabeth@worldpittsburgh.org for more information.

Media Sponsor:

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Mobashar Jawad Akbar
Breakfast Briefing
Converging Interests: India’s ‘Look East’ and America’s ‘Asia Pivot’

Mobashar Jawad “MJ” Akbar
Acclaimed Author and Columnist and National Spokesperson for the Bharatiya Janata Party

October 1, 2014

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Register Now!

Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the BJP were swept into office with an unprecedented mandate – largely due to their domestic vision for India. But, when the new government assumed office in May 2014, it said foreign policy would also be one of its top priorities. After more than 100 days in office, what does India’s foreign policy look like under Modi? 

India’s “Look East” policy was launched two decades ago, but it is now developing real substance around economic and security issues. Modi embarked on his maiden foreign trip with a visit to Bhutan, thereby underscoring his government's commitment to consolidate ties in India's neighborhood. He then traveled to Nepal, becoming the first Indian PM to visit Kathmandu for a bilateral meeting in 17 years. In September, Modi visited Japan to discuss defense cooperation and other bilateral issues and later in the month Chinese president Xi Jinping will travel to Delhi to discuss investment and security cooperation.

Join the Council on the heels of Prime Minister Modi’s bilateral talks with President Barack Obama following the UN General Assembly to hear about Modi’s foreign policy priorities from one of India’s most widely respected journalists and public intellectuals. 

MJ Akbar has helped shape India’s media landscape. He conceived, designed, and edited The Telegraph, helped launch The Asian Age, and founded both Covert magazine and the Sunday Guardian. He served as editorial director of India Today, India’s leading English-language news magazine and of the Headlines Today television channel. For many years, he also wrote a regular column for the Sunday edition of the Times of India.

He was elected to the Lok Sabha, India’s Parliament, as a member of the Congress party, in 1989 and served until 1992, when he resigned from government and left politics.  He returned to politics in the spring of 2014 when he became national spokesperson for the Bharatiya Janata Party, a position that he continues to hold.

Mr. Akbar regularly lectures in the United States and Canada, and has been a featured speaker at a number of North America’s finest universities. He was also a visiting fellow at Brookings from 2006 through 2013. His most recent book is Tinderbox: The Past and Future of Pakistan.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $25 | Non-Members: $50

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after September 29, 2014 will be charged.

This event is held with support from the University of Pittsburgh.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Peace in the Middle East?
Special Seminar and Video Conference
Peace in the Middle East? A German View of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Ruprecht Polenz
Former Chairman of the German Bundestag’s Committee on Foreign Affairs

October 3, 2014

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.

Hosted by North Hills High School

Register Now!

For years, violence in the Middle East has been on the rise. This summer, tension between Israelis and Palestinians has reignited a decades old conflict. The international community is keeping a close watch on this and other Middle East “hotspots”—such as Egypt, Syria, and Iraq—with each country having its own reaction and response to the growing violence. What does it take to achieve peace in the Middle East? How should the global community respond?

During this special seminar and video conference, students will hear from Ruprecht Polenz, German politician and former Chairman of the German Bundestag’s Committee on Foreign Affairs, about the conflict in the Middle East. He will provide a German point of view on the current situation in Israel and Palestine, and address how a policy towards the region should look and the response needed by the global community. Following Mr. Polenz’s remarks, students will have the opportunity to ask questions during a moderated discussion.

Ruprecht Polenz was a Member of the German Bundestag from 1994 to 2013, and served as the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs from 2005 to 2013. In 2000, he was the Secretary-General of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU). Throughout his career, Mr. Polenz‘s primary focus has been on foreign and security policy — with a regional emphasis on the Middle East (particularly Iran, Turkey, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict). He has also been an advocate of strong transatlantic relations. Mr. Polenz is currently President of the German Society for Eastern European Studies, Dean of the Global Diplomacy Lab, Senior Associate Fellow at the German Council on Foreign Relations, and a Member of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Video Conference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Please call Elizabeth Cook at 412-224-4339, or e-mail elizabeth@worldpittsburgh.org.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Peter Schneider Author and JournalistEdit Content
Special Seminar and Video Conference
Understanding Germany 25 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Peter Schneider
Author of Berlin Now: The City after the Wall

September 25, 2014

Thursday, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Hosted by Trinity High School

Register Now!

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, a structure that divided East and West Germany for decades following World War II. Once a physically divided city, Berlin has become a leading destination for tourists, scholars, business leaders, and artists. However, as Berlin continues to grow into a thriving metropolis, a new wall seems to be forming—one based on race, ethnicity, and religion. How Berliners react and respond to these changes will greatly impact the city’s ability to succeed.

During this special seminar and video conference, students will hear from Peter Schneider, a German writer and social critic, and author of Berlin Now: The City after the Wall. Using modern Berlin as a lens, he will highlight the ways in which Berlin has become a rapidly changing metropolis. Questions will address the unintended consequences and benefits of opening the Wall, the racial tensions that exist and what influence they have on Berlin’s continued growth, and more. Following Mr. Schneider’s remarks, students will have the opportunity to ask questions during a moderated discussion.   

Peter Schneider was born in Lübeck, Germany, and has lived in Berlin on and off since the 1960s. He has taught at many American universities—including Stanford, Princeton, and Harvard—and is the author of more than twenty books, including Eduard’sHomecoming. He has also written for newspapers, including Der Spiegel, The New York Times, Le Monde, and La Repubblica. Since the 1960s, Peter Schneider has been a keen observer of Berlin. His novel Der Mauerspringer (The Wall Jumper) was first published in 1983, and has become a classic. In it he describes life in the shadow of the Wall. His new book, Berlin Now: The City after the Wall (translated by Sophie Schlondorff) is a collection of perceptive and witty essays about modern Berlin.

Video Conference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Emily Markham at emily@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7027.

Register Now!

 

Iran, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East   In the Hot Seat and Video Conference
In the Hot Seat and Video Conference
Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews: Iran, Iraq, and the Greater Middle East

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews
President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

September 9, 2014

10:15 – 11:30 a.m.

Hosted by Cornell High School

Register Now!

Nearly four decades after the hostage crisis, the U.S. and Iran have entered a new era where negotiations regarding Iran’s nuclear program are possible. In contrast, three and a half years after the U.S. troop withdrawal, Iraq is embroiled in political and humanitarian crises. Extremist Sunni militant groups, including the ISIS, have taken over swaths of northern and western Iraq, leading an estimated 1.2 million people to flee from potential violence. Some have fled to Syria, where civil war continues, and a lack of governance provides a staging ground for violent militant groups. In early August, the U.S. began using airstrikes to contain militants in Iraq, but has yet to commit to addressing the violence in Syria. What is the U.S. strategy in the Greater Middle East? What will the future hold for the relationship between the U.S. and Iran? How are U.S. airstrikes affecting the situation on the ground in Iraq? How are regional actors affecting internal politics?

For this event, students at Cornell High School will unpack the current situation in the region by hosting a talk-show style discussion with Dr. Mathews. Dr. Steven E. Sokol, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, will facilitate the session. Up to five interactive video conference sites can participate and submit questions prior to the program.

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a global think tank with offices in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beijing, Brussels, and Beirut. Her distinguished career has included posts in the federal government, nonprofits, and policy organizations. She was formerly director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Washington program and a senior fellow, and was founding vice president and director of research of the World Resources Institute. Dr. Mathews sits on multiple boards and publishes widely in newspapers and in scientific and foreign policy journals.

Video Conference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7973.

Register Now!

 

global travel scholar
Travel Tales:
True Stories from First-Time International Travelers

September 18, 2014

6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for refreshments

Bricolage Production Company, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Do you like listening to stories told live?

Do you like hearing about the adventures people experienced while traveling abroad?

Do you remember what it was like to visit a new place for the first time?

Register Now!

Through the World Affairs Council’s Global Travel Scholarship Program, more than 100 high school students from throughout the Pittsburgh region have participated in The Experiment in International Living over the past decade. They’ve traveled to places as close as Costa Rica and as far flung as Mongolia or Tanzania. They’ve been exposed to cuisine and culture in France and Italy, art and architecture in Morocco and Japan, and challenges in Peru and Thailand. They’ve done community service projects, lived with host families, and one student even used Spanish to get around Seoul, South Korea! Each Global Travel Scholar has grown through their international exposure — and they’ve lived to tell the tales.

Join us for an exciting evening of live storytelling by young people from throughout the Pittsburgh community who had the opportunity to travel abroad during the summer after their Junior year of high school. The most recent cohort of 2014 Global Travel Scholars will be joined by several past participants to reflect on their experience as a first-time traveler outside of the country and on the impact it has had.

You’ll laugh! You’ll cry! This is not your average slideshow from your neighbor’s summer vacation!

Registration
This event is free, but seating is limited. Please register to attend.

Donations can be made to support the Council’s Global Travel Scholarship Program.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

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Ruprecht Polenz Former Member of the German Bundestag (CDU) Former Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations
The Dr. Henry A. Kissinger Transatlantic Speaker Program of the ACG Pittsburgh Eric M. Warburg Chapter

Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon on the occasion of German Unity Day
Germany’s Role in the World

Ruprecht Polenz
Former Member of the German Bundestag (CDU)
Former Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations

October 3, 2014

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Register Now!

This autumn marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. And, October 3rd commemorates Germany’s (re)unification following its division after World War II. From 1949 until 1990, the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic had an uneasy coexistence. Since 1990, the two Germanys have grown together, and a new Germany has emerged. It has assumed a significant role on the international stage.

Germany continues to be an “economic giant” which has weathered the Euro crisis, but it is no longer a “political dwarf.” Germany remains the key economic and political driver within the European Union. It’s military engagement in Afghanistan marked a significant change in the country’s foreign and security policy.  And, Germany plays a key role as an “honest broker” in many global hotspots — such as Crimea.

With the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the horizon and German-American relations at a low point over allegations of spying, this is an opportune time to hear from one of Germany’s most distinguished politicians and foreign policy experts. Join the American Council on Germany and the World Affairs Council for a timely discussion on the occasion of German Unity Day!

Ruprecht Polenz was a Member of the German Bundestag from 1994 to 2013, and served as the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs from 2005 to 2013. In 2000, he was the Secretary-General of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU). Throughout his career, Mr. Polenz‘s primary focus has been on foreign and security policy — with a regional emphasis on the Middle East (particularly Iran,  Turkey, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict). He has also been an advocate of strong transatlantic relations.

Mr. Polenz is currently President of the German Society for Eastern European Studies, Dean of the Global Diplomacy Lab, Senior Associate Fellow at the German Council on Foreign Relations, and a Member of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Registration
ACG and WAC members: $50 | Non-members of either organization: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after September 29, 2014 will be charged.

Register Now!

This event is part of the American Council on Germany's Dr. Henry A. Kissinger Transatlantic Speakers Program at the Warburg Chapters, and is made possible by a generous grant from the Robert Bosch Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Berlin Now: The City after the Wall
Berlin Now: The City after the Wall

Peter Schneider
Author and Journalist

September 25, 2014

4:00 p.m.

Teutonia Männerchor, 857 Phineas St., Pittsburgh’s North Side

Register Now!

It isn’t Europe’s most beautiful city, or its oldest. Its architecture is not more impressive than that of Rome or Paris. Its museums do not hold more treasures than those in Barcelona or London. And yet, when citizens of “New York, Tel Aviv, or Rome ask me where I’m from and I mention the name Berlin,” writes Peter Schneider, “their eyes instantly light up.”

In many ways, Berlin is one of the world’s most interesting cities. Divided between east and west for nearly three decades, Berlin was at the epicenter of the Cold War. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago, Berlin has become a vibrant metropolis which characterizes contemporary Germany. Yet, the city remains divided. Join the GABC and the Council to celebrate the anniversary of the fall of the Wall with one of Germany’s most thoughtful social critics who will offer his perceptions and insights on one of Europe’s most vibrant cities.

Since the 1960s, Peter Schneider has been a keen observer of Berlin. His novel Der Mauerspringer (The Wall Jumper) was first published in 1983, and has become a classic. In it he describes life in the shadow of the Wall. His new book, Berlin Now: The City after the Wall (translated by Sophie Schlondorff) is a collection of perceptive and witty essays about modern Berlin.

Peter Schneider was born in Lübeck, Germany, and has lived in Berlin on and off since the 1960s. He has taught at many American universities — including Stanford, Princeton, and Harvard — and is the author of more than twenty books, including  Eduard’s Homecoming. He has also written for newspapers, including Der Spiegel, The New York Times, Le Monde, and La Repubblica.

Registration
The cost to attend this event is $35, which includes traditional German food and beverages.

Registration is required. No-shows and cancellations after September 19, 2014 will be charged.

Copies of Peter Schneider’s most recent book will be on sale at the event.

Register Now!

This event is made possible by the

 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Engaging Iran: A New Way Forward?
Engaging Iran: A New Way Forward?

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews
President
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Amb. Thomas R. Pickering
Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs
Former U.S. Ambassador to Russia        

September 9, 2014

5:00 - 6:30 p.m.

Point Park University, Lawrence Hall Ballroom, Third Floor, 212 Wood St., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

It has been months since U.S. President Barack Obama announced that an interim deal had been struck between the group known as  the P5+1 and Iranian leadership over Iran’s nuclear program. The P5+1 includes Germany and the permanent members of the U.N. Security Council (China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States). In the meantime, a series of meetings have left analysts and observers speculating over the state of affairs. In late July, negotiators agreed to a four-month extension of talks to craft a final comprehensive deal. Many open questions remain as the deliberations move forward and the details of the agreement emerge.

What are the next steps in negotiating an agreement with Iran? Join two of the country’s preeminent foreign policy experts — who both serve as advisory members of  The Iran Project — for an analysis of one of the most significant geopolitical challenges of the 21st century.

Dr. Jessica Tuchman Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, a global think tank with offices in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beijing, Brussels, and Beirut. Her distinguished career has included posts in the federal government, nonprofits, and policy organizations. She was formerly director of the Council on Foreign Relations’ Washington program and a senior fellow, and was founding vice president and director of research of the World Resources Institute. Dr. Mathews sits on multiple boards and publishes widely in newspapers and in scientific and foreign policy journals.

Amb. Thomas R. Pickering is the former U.S. Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs and has served as U.S. Ambassador to Russia, India, the United Nations, Israel, and in numerous other posts. Widely regarded as one of the most exceptional diplomats in the history of the U.S. State Department, Amb. Pickering is the namesake of the Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program. Following his retirement, he served as an executive as Boeing and currently is the chairman at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress as well as the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy.

Registration
Students (with valid ID): Free | General: $15 | VIP: $50

(VIPs receive special seating and a private reception with the speakers beginning at 4:30 p.m.)

Registration is required. No-shows and cancellations after September 3, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

 

With special thanks to:

 

Media Sponsor:

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

World Affairs Institute 2014: Russia¯s Place in the World
44th World Affairs Institute for Student Leaders
Russia’s Place in the World

November 19, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Senator John Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

What is the objective of the Institute?
The Institute engages high school student leaders in a discussion of key issues in international affairs so that they can understand and think critically about their world.

Who can attend the Institute?
High school students are selected by local Rotary Clubs (Districts 6650, 7280, 7300, and 7330) in cooperation with schools. Each Rotary Club determines the number of scholarships available.

How many student delegates will attend?
Approximately 350 high school juniors and seniors.

How is the conference structured?
Through panel presentations and small breakout sessions, experts will discuss key issues with the student delegates. Each student will receive a comprehensive background paper prior to the Institute.

Who pays for the scholarships?
Each Rotary Club pays for the number of scholarships it is sponsoring.  The fee of $75 for each delegate will cover the cost of registration, educational materials, all conference sessions, lunch, and refreshments

Tentative Institute Schedule

  9:00 a.m.     Registration
  9:30 a.m.     Welcome and Introduction
  9:45 a.m.     Keynote Speaker or Panel w/ Q&A
11:30 a.m.    
Panel Discussion
12:30 p.m.     Institute Luncheon and Group Discussion Session
  2:00 p.m.     Discussion Group De-Briefing
 
3:00p.m.      Adjournment

How to Register
Student Registration
Please use this link to complete the online registration form to confirm your acceptance of the scholarship.

Chaperone Registration
Chaperones please use this link for registration.

Information on This Year's Topic

Since the start of the new millennium, the global community has been watching Russia as it takes on a new role on the world’s stage.

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989—with the end of the Cold War and dissolution of the Soviet Union—marked a decrease in Russia’s power and authority on a global and regional scale. Twenty-five years later, Vladimir Putin’s Russia is the world’s largest oil producer and maintains the second strongest military, behind the United States. As a permanent voting member of the United Nations Security Council, Russia is a global power. Over the past decade Russia has worked to expand its influence abroad by strengthening relations in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

The 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and the annexation of Ukrainian held Crimea brought Russia to the attention of the global community. Russia faced both international and domestic criticism, including civil unrest, for the government’s corrupt motives and laws. Further, as Russia tries to exert control over ethnically-Russian regions outside its border, violent regional conflict continues to grow.  

This year’s World Affairs Institute will look at the growing influence of Russia and its role on geopolitics. Students will explore both the domestic, regional, and international challenges facing Russia, bilateral relations with the United States, and the transformation of Russia under the leadership of President Vladimir Putin.

The World Affairs Council will provide participants with up-to-date online resources as well as a comprehensive background paper on the topic. Online resources can be found by visiting www.WAIpittsburgh.wordpress.com.

Thoughts on the Institute

“Today, Russia is once again isolating itself from the international community, setting back decades of genuine progress.”
-President Barack Obama  President, United States

“Russia doesn’t consider NATO a partner; Russia considers NATO an adversary.”          
-Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Secretary General, NATO

“We will judge Russia’s commitment to peace by its actions, not its words. Peace is still possible, but any new ceasefire must be mutual and monitored.“
- Amb. Daniel Baer, U.S State Dept. Representative,
Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe

Russia is not America’s antagonist...nor is it an ally. The two sides disagree on a wide range of questions. Yet there are critical international issues—such as Iran and Syria—on which progress is not likely without some cooperation.”
-Dr. Angela Stent, Director of Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies, Georgetown University

This year’s World Affairs Institute marks the 44th year of collaboration between the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Rotary International.

About Rotary International
Rotary is a worldwide organization of more than 1.2 million business, professional, and community leaders. The mission of Rotary International is to provide service to others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders. There are 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Clubs are non-partisan, non-denominational, and open to all cultures, races, and creeds. As signified by the motto, “Service Above Self,” Rotary’s main objective is service - in the community, in the workplace, and throughout the world.

About the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting a deeper understanding of key contemporary international issues throughout Western Pennsylvania. Established in 1931, the Council has a special focus on secondary schools throughout the region, and works to give students and teachers a more nuanced understanding of the global issues of our time. The Council also is committed to informing opinion leaders and decision-makers about developments around the world as they unfold - and to educating them about the relevance of such developments to the region. 

Questions?
Contact Emily Markham at the Council by phone at 412. 281.7027 or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Amb-Carden-Picture-HI-RES.png
Breakfast Briefing
The U.S. Pivot to Asia: Why ASEAN Matters

Amb. David Carden
Partner-in-Charge of Asia, Jones Day
Former U.S. Ambassador to the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN)

July 24, 2014

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

The Obama Administration’s strategic recalibration toward Asia — commonly known as the “Asia pivot” —  is well-documented and has been addressed by political leaders, analysts, and pundits, but the stakes have never been higher. With a combined population of some four billion people, the region is as much a trendsetter and economic powerhouse as it is a flashpoint in geopolitics. From the on-going tension between China and its neighbors, to natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan, to emerging economies and their resource needs, to the growing economic opportunities, to the ambitious negotiations for a 21st century trade agreement under the auspices of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Asia-Pacific presents complex challenges as well as significant opportunities.

Join the World Affairs Council to learn from a former senior diplomat to the region and business practitioner about America’s evolving relationship with the Asia-Pacific region in the 21st century.

Ambassador (Ret.) David Carden returned to Jones Day in early 2014 after serving as the first resident U.S. Ambassador to the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) from March 2011 through 2013. He is currently based in Singapore and serves as Jones Days’ Partner-in-Charge of Asia.

As U.S. Ambassador, David Carden oversaw the broadening engagement of the United States in Southeast Asia, which included the Obama Administration’s 2011 “pivot” to Asia. Based in the U.S. Mission to ASEAN in Jakarta, he traveled extensively throughout the ASEAN’s ten member states and Asia. His responsibilities included supporting ASEAN as it moves toward economic integration in 2015 and advocating for the systemic changes necessary to promote peaceful and prosperous growth in the region. Under his leadership, the U.S. Mission focused on a host of issues including economic development, trade liberalization, intellectual property protection, developing effective governance, pandemic preparedness and prevention, effective responses to natural disasters,  the advancement of health care and educational opportunities, trafficking, food and water security, and sustainable cities. He worked to build alliances in the region — including facilitating efforts by the embassies of countries in the European Union and Latin America in their engagement with ASEAN.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $25 | Non-Members: $50

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.  No-shows and cancellations after July 21, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to Jones Day for supporting this event.

 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Kavitha Rajagopalan Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Emergent Cities Project at the World Policy Institute Author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of their Immigrant Families in the West
Political Salon
The Emergent City: Capitalizing on Migration and the Informal Economy

Kavitha Rajagopalan
Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Emergent Cities Project at the World Policy Institute
Author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of their Immigrant Families in the West

July 16, 2014

6:00-8:00 p.m.

The Livermore, 124 South Highland Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

What will the city of tomorrow look like? For the first time in history, more people live in cities than in rural areas — and by mid-century, urban populations are projected to double to seven billion. As cities are growing in population, they are increasing their geographic footprint at an accelerating pace. Most of this growth is taking place in the developing world where cities are receiving millions of rural migrants annually. Few cities are able to absorb these new urban dwellers into the formal economy and cannot provide adequate housing, transportation, health care, and other public services. Meanwhile, in the developed world, urban migrants — particularly the undocumented — are regularly denied access to formal employment and public services, forcing them to fall back on informal networks. In short: the movement of people to urban areas brings a myriad of challenges — but also opportunities.

Join Vibrant Pittsburgh and the World Affairs Council to learn more about the “emergent city” and lessons that Pittsburgh can learn from cities undergoing structural change. This event comes on the heels of an announcement at the 2014 Clinton Global Initiative America by the World Policy Institute regarding the launch of a two-year pilot project to repopulate and revitalize Detroit using lessons learned from thriving communities in developing world megacities.

Kavitha Rajagopalan is the Co-Director of the Emergent City Project at the World Policy Institute. She is the author of Muslims of Metropolis: The Stories of Three Immigrant Families in the West, a narrative nonfiction exploration of integration and identity formation in the urban Muslim diaspora. Her projects include research and advocacy on the causes and consequences of undocumented migration, urban informality, and minority access to mainstream financial systems. She writes widely on global migration and diversity and has taught related courses at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs.

Registration
There is a $20 charge for this event - including one drink ticket and appetizers provided by Bar Marco. No-shows and cancellations after July 11, 2014 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

With thanks to the Heinrich Böll Foundation for supporting this event.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

U.S.-Vietnam Relations and the Rebalance to Asia
Breakfast Briefing
U.S.-Vietnam Relations and the Rebalance to Asia

Dr. Scott Kofmehl
Senior Vietnam Desk Officer
U.S. Department of State

July 8, 2014

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

It has been over 50 years since the U.S. sent combat advisors to Vietnam, a first step in a massive escalation that included the deployment of over half a million U.S. military personnel at the peak of American involvement in the Vietnam War. Relations chilled after the conflict, but 1995 marked the formal normalization of trade relations with Vietnam. For the last two decades, the international community has witnessed the country of some 89 million people ascend as an important power in the Asia-Pacific.

Still a one-party Communist state forged from decades of conflict, Vietnam has one of the fastest-growing economies and aspires to be a developed nation within the next decade. Just seven years ago, Vietnam joined the World Trade Organization as its 150th member.

In the midst of these developments, what’s next for Vietnam? As the Asia-Pacific becomes increasingly more important to American foreign policy, join the World Affairs Council and a senior U.S. State Department diplomat for an examination of the U.S.-Vietnam relationship in the 21st century.

Dr. Scott Kofmehl joined the Foreign Service in 2006. He is currently based in Washington, D.C. where he serves as the Senior Vietnam Desk Officer at the U.S. Department of State. Dr. Kofmehl has served in various diplomatic posts overseas, including Chief of Staff at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad Pakistan, Economic Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, and Vice Consul at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Mexico. He graduated from North Allegheny High School and earned his Bachelor of Arts in International Political Economy from Juniata College, Master’s from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and Ph.D. in international relations from the London School of Economics. Dr. Kofmehl's spouse, Aryani Manring, is also a Foreign Service Officer, currently serving as the Mongolia Desk Officer. They live in Washington, D.C. with their daughter.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $25 | Non-Members: $50
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.  No-shows and cancellations after July 3, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Rethinking the Revolution:
Rethinking the Revolution:
U.S.-Cuba Relations in the 21st Century

Dr. Sarah Stephens
Executive Director
Center for Democracy in the Americas

June 24, 2014

6:00 p.m.

Conflict Kitchen, Schenley Plaza, Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Ninety miles. This is the distance that separates the United States from Cuba. On clear days, one can see the shores of Cuba from the Florida Keys. So close, yet so far away... This expanse has been emblematic of the U.S.-Cuban relationship for decades. By far the largest Caribbean island both in geography and population, Cuba has been a flash point in American politics, and has left many divided on how to approach the Communist nation closest to the U.S. mainland.

Join Conflict Kitchen and the World Affairs Council for dinner and to hear from a leading Cuba expert. The discussion will focus on this influential island nation and those who shape it — as well as the economic, political, and social ramifications for the U.S.-Cuba relationship moving forward.

Sarah Stephens is the Executive Director of the Center for Democracy in the Americas (CDA), which she launched in 2006. A long-time human rights advocate, she began her work in the 1980s at El Rescate, a center for Central American refugees in Los Angeles, and then worked for the Hollywood Women’s Political Committee on human rights. She later founded and directed Artists for a Hate Free America, an entertainment industry-backed organization geared toward encouraging youth involvement in human rights and civil rights issues.

In her current capacity, Ms. Stephens works with U.S. policymakers, journalists, and others to change the debate on U.S. foreign policy toward the Western Hemisphere. She has led numerous delegations to Latin America on fact-finding and research missions. She has advocated for changes in U.S. policy toward Cuba before Congress, and at forums in the United States and in Latin America. Her commentary has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Washington Times, Huffington Post, and the Havana Note.

Registration
There is a $25 charge for this event - including dinner and drinks provided by Conflict Kitchen. World Affairs Council events are open to the public.

No-shows and cancellations after June 20, 2014 will be charged. Please advise in advance if you have dietary restrictions.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

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U.S.-Russian Relations After Crimea

Professor of Government and Director of Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies at Georgetown University
Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution

June 11, 2014

6:00 p.m.

ELEVEN, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Since November 2013, Ukraine has spiraled into the throes of unrest and instability, marked by violence, the annexation of Crimea by Russian forces, and a tense geopolitical stand off between the West and Moscow. With the future of Ukraine on the brink, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh welcomes one of the world’s foremost authorities on U.S.-Russian affairs for an exploration of one of the most pressing international issues of the 21st century.

Dr. Angela Stent is Director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and Professor of Government and Foreign Service at Georgetown University. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and co-chairs its Hewett Forum on Post-Soviet Affairs. From 2004 to 2006 she served as National Intelligence Officer for Russia and Eurasia at the National Intelligence Council. From 1999 to 2001, she served in the Office of Policy Planning at the U.S. Department of State.

Dr. Stent’s academic work focuses on the triangular political and economic relationship between the U.S., Russia, and Europe. The author of multiple noteworthy publications,  her most recent book is The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century (Princeton University Press, 2014).

Dr. Stent has been a member of the advisory panel for NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander in Europe. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is a contributing editor to Survival and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Cold War Studies, World Policy Journal, and Internationale Politik. She served on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council for Russia and Central Asia. Dr. Stent earned her B.A. from Cambridge University, her MSc. with distinction from the London School of Economics and Political Science and her M.A. and PhD. from Harvard University.

Registration
$250 per person

Includes signed book: The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty First Century 

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

RSVP to Melanie at (412) 281-7055 or melanie@worldpittsburgh.org

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

At the Nexus of Geopolitics:  Turkey¯s Today and in the Future
Breakfast Briefing
At the Nexus of Geopolitics: Turkey Today and in the Future

Dr. Yakup Atila Eralp
Director of the EU Center, Middle East Technical University

May 16, 2014

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Emily Markham at 412.281.7027.

Turkey has long been at the crossroads of empires, but also a powerful geopolitical presence in its own right for centuries. It is no stranger to balancing and negotiating the opportunities and challenges that come with it’s unique geographical location spanning east and west. As such, Turkey’s role in 21st century global developments is increasingly important.

As a NATO member and a majority Muslim country, combined with its emerging economic presence (the 17th largest GDP in the world) and its strategic location between mainland Asia and the European continent, Turkey contends with multiple issues within its sphere of influence. From revolutions, civil wars, economic development, and changing sociopolitical landscapes, there is little regularity or predictability within the region Turkey calls home.

Yet, while developments in Europe, the Caucasus, and the Middle East are a source of great concern for globe watchers around the world, Turkey must daily navigate its constantly evolving neighborhood as well as domestic politics. How does Turkey achieve this balance? What is Turkey’s role in the geopolitical order as we move further into the 21st century? Join the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and one of Turkey’s most senior academics to examine Turkey’s past and the forecast for its future.

Dr. Yakup Atila Eralp is a Professor at the Middle East Technical University, a position he has held since 1995. His main focus of research is on Turkey and its international economic relations toward the East and the West, as well as the European Union. With over four decades of experience in international economics, Dr. Eralp has published extensively on the international policy economy of Turkey, the country’s role in the broader Middle East, its relationship with Europe and the United States, and its current relationship with Iran. A recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship, he earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California. He has held prominent academic positions and fellowships at the London School of Economics and Princeton University, respectively.

Registration
WAC members: $25 | Non-members: $50

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after May 12, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Emily Markham at 412.281.7027.

With thanks to the E.U. Center for Excellence and European Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh for supporting this event.

 

Global Education, Civic Engagement,  and America¯s Role in the World
R. Daniel McMichael Memorial Luncheon

Global Education, Civic Engagement, and America’s Role in the World

Dr. Schuyler Foerster
Brent Scowcroft Professor of National Security Studies
U.S. Air Force Academy Department of Political Science and Eisenhower Center for Space and Defense Studies
Former President of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

Featuring introductory remarks from Vice Admiral Robin R. Braun, Chief of the Navy Reserve and Commander of the Navy Reserve Force

June 3, 2014

12:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

At this event, the World Affairs Council will present the Donald E. Farr and George C. Oehmler Awards to an outstanding high school student and teacher in connection with the Council’s education programs

As we move further into the 21st century, the role of the United States on the international stage is evolving. In an increasingly interconnected world bound together by technology, complex economies, and other emerging trends, the importance of global education has never been more significant than it is today.

Emerging from over a decade of conflict, political dissent, and economic challenges, the American approach to foreign policy faces multiple challenges around the world. Whether it is the “Asia Pivot,” changing sociopolitical dynamics in the Middle East, or an escalating situation in Ukraine, U.S. leadership is deeply intertwined in a complex global environment. 

How important is a global education to 21st century Americans? What are the implications of America’s changing role in the world? Join the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh as we welcome back an important Council leader to examine these pressing and important issues that will define the coming decades.

Dr. Schuyler Foerster is the Brent Scowcroft Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Air Force Academy Department of Political Science and Eisenhower Center for Space and Defense Studies, where he focuses on foreign and national security policy, international relations, and American government. Following retirement from the Air Force, he served for over 12 years as President of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, receiving national and local awards for establishing the Council as a leader in secondary school and grass roots education on global issues. He is currently President of the board of directors of the Colorado Springs World Affairs Council and serves on the national board and executive committee of the World Affairs Councils of America.

This event is held with support from the Navy League.

Registration
WAC members: $50 | Non-members: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after May 29, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

R. Daniel McMichael passed away in September 2013. A former Director and President of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, he played a seminal role in establishing the Council’s international education outreach to area schools.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Enriching a Compromise: Can the P5 + 1 and Iran Complete the Deal?
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Enriching a Compromise: Can the P5 + 1 and Iran Complete the Deal?

Bad Date

Register Now!

Register Now!

 

Europe¯s Watershed Moment: What the Conflict in Ukraine Means for Europe,  the U.S., and Relations with Russia
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Europe’s Watershed Moment:
What the Conflict in Ukraine Means for Europe,
the United States, and Relations with Russia

The Dr. Henry A. Kissinger Transatlantic Speaker Program of the ACG Pittsburgh Eric M. Warburg Chapter

Dr. Constanze Stelzenmüller
Senior Transatlantic Fellow and Director of Transatlantic Trends, German Marshall Fund of the United States

May 12, 2014

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

After 1989, Europeans and Americans thought they could balance their interests with those of Russia in Europe’s eastern periphery, which stretches from Belarus to the Caucasus. The ongoing developments in Ukraine have changed that calculation. A revolution ousted Ukraine’s Russian-backed leadership and has installed a Western-oriented interim government that has already forged closer ties to the European Union in advance of upcoming elections slated for May.

Russia has responded in its own way: Russian troops occupy Crimea, the peninsula is annexed, and a clear demarcation is now drawn between the interests of the West — namely Europe and the United States — and the interests of the Russian Federation bent on re-establishing itself as a global superpower.

As such, the invasion and annexation of Crimea changes the relationship to one of systemic competition—and some even fear a renewed Cold War. What will happen now, and what are our options? Join the World Affairs Council and the American Council on Germany's Eric M. Warburg Chapter in Pittsburgh for expert analysis on the pressing issue from one of Europe’s most experienced analysts.

Dr. Constanze Stelzenmüller is a Senior Transatlantic Fellow with the German Marshall Fund in Berlin, and directs the GMF’s annual "Transatlantic Trends" survey. Previously, she served as Director of GMF’s Berlin office, and worked as a reporter and international security editor with the weekly DIE ZEIT in Hamburg. She is an international lawyer by training, and studied in Bonn, Geneva, and at Harvard. Dr. Stelzenmüller speaks and publishes regularly on issues related to German, European, and transatlantic security, as well as on foreign and defense policy. She chairs the academic advisory council of the German Foundation on Peace Research, and was the chairwoman of Women in International Security Germany from 2009 to 2013. 

Registration
ACG and WAC members: $50 | Non-members of either organization: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after May 5, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration for this event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

This event is part of the American Council on Germany's Dr. Henry A. Kissinger Transatlantic Speakers Program at the Warburg Chapters, and is made possible by a generous grant from the Robert Bosch Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

¯It¯s all about Freedom!¯ Russia, Crimea, and the Future of Ukraine
Off-the-Record
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
“It’s all about Freedom!” Russia, Crimea, and the Future of Ukraine

Kent Logsdon
Chief of Staff, Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources
U.S. Department of State
Former Political Counselor, U.S. Embassy Kiev

April 4, 2014

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

In recent weeks, the world has been gripped by news from Ukraine. As developments unfold, people struggle to understand their impact within Ukraine, and internationally.

Demonstrations against now-ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s decision to forego a closer relationship with the European Union and forge closer ties to Russia quickly turned to violence, leaving scores dead in Kiev’s Independence Square. Recently, a public referendum declared Crimea as officially part of the Russian Federation.

Defying the United States and Europe, Russian President Vladimir Putin moved Russian forces into the region asserting that “Crimea has always been an integral part of Russia in the hearts and minds of people.” In response to such overtures, Interim Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk has declared Ukraine “will never surrender.” U.S. President Barack Obama has repeatedly stated that Russia is in violation of international law.

Are the developments in Ukraine — as Eurasia Group President Ian Bremmer suggests — “the most seismic geopolitical events since 9/11”? Are there solutions? Join the World Affairs Council for this off-the-record discussion about the emerging international crisis as it develops.

Kent Logsdon is the Chief of Staff to the Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources. Prior, he served as Deputy Executive Secretary of the State Department. A member of the Senior Foreign Service, his previous positions include Director of the Operations Center, Director of the Office of Russian Affairs, and Deputy Chief of Mission in Tbilisi, Georgia. Mr. Logsdon has also served as Political Counselor in Kyiv, Ukraine; and held a variety of positions in Bangkok, Thailand; Almaty, Kazakhstan; Islamabad, Pakistan; and Stuttgart, Germany. Kent speaks Russian, Ukrainian, Thai and German. He is originally from Sewickley, Pennsylvania. He holds a Master’s Degree in International Relations from the University of Virginia and a Bachelor’s Degree in Government from the University of Notre Dame. He is married to Foreign Service Officer Michelle Rabayda Logsdon.

Registration
WAC members: $50 | Non-members: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 31, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Economic Integration and Economic Competitiveness: The Competitive Advantages of the U.S.-Canada  Economic and Energy Relationship
Economic Integration and Economic Competitiveness: The Competitive Advantages of the U.S.-Canada
Economic and Energy Relationship

Armchair Discussion with The Honorable Gary Doer
Ambassador of Canada to the United States

April 7, 2014

9:00 - 10:30 a.m.

Pop-Up Canada!, 623 Smithfield St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

The United States and Canada share the longest, peaceful border in the world and have a long tradition of close cooperation. The countries are each other's most important trading partners, with two-way goods trade totaling $632billion annually - a trading relationship that dwarfs that of any other bilateral trading relationship in the world!

U.S.–Canada trade is characterized by highly integrated manufacturing sectors and supply chains and highly successful regulatory regimes. The two economies have become so integrated, so seamless, that countless firms have developed internal production value chains that operate back and forth across the border. This relationship drives innovation and creates a more competitive North American trading bloc.

How has the U.S.–Canada economic relationship evolved since the signing of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement? With a growing energy relationship, and the resurgence of manufacturing in North America, what sort of opportunities does the future hold — particularly for Pittsburgh’s connection with our northern neighbor? Join the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the Canadian Consulate for an exploration of these questions and more with one of Canada’s most well-respected and distinguished public servants.

Ambassador Gary Doer assumed his responsibilities as Canada's 23rd representative to the United States of America in October 2009. Prior, Amb. Doer served as Premier of Manitoba for ten years. He has worked extensively with U.S. Governors to enhance Canada-U.S. cooperation on trade, agriculture, water protection, climate change, and renewable energy. Amb. Doer won three consecutive elections as Premier of Manitoba with successive increased majorities. In 2005, he was named by Business Week as one of the top 20 international leaders on climate change. His government introduced balanced budgets during each of his ten years in office while reducing many taxes, including a plan to eliminate small business tax. As Premier, he led strategic investments in health care, education, and training and infrastructure.

Registration
This event is free, but registration is required.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In partnership with Pop-Up Canada!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Geopolitics of Emotion: Peace and Reconciliation; Love and Forgiveness
Geopolitics of Emotion: Peace and Reconciliation; Love and Forgiveness

Conversations and reflections with members of the NGO Advisory Council of the Fetzer Institute

March 28, 2014

5:00-7:30 p.m.

Children’s Museum, 10 Children’s Way, Allegheny Square, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

One cannot fully understand the world in which we live without trying to integrate and understand its emotions. This is true on the micro-level in individual families and within communities – but it is also true globally. On some levels, feelings drive globalization – and emotions (such as fear, humiliation, and hope) might be as influential as the cultural, social, and economic factors that breed political conflict and contribute to reconciliation.

Join the NGO Advisory Council of the Fetzer Institute, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh for a special evening of conversation and reflection sparked by the world premiere of  XOXO: an Exhibit about Love and Forgiveness at the Children’s Museum. Facilitators will use hands-on, participatory activities to engage the audience in exploring the role of powerful emotions in the 21st century. 

Gregg Behr
Executive Director, The Grable Foundation

Elizabeth T. Boris
Founding Director, Center on Nonprofits & Philanthropy, Urban Institute

Thomas J. Harvey
Director, Nonprofit Excellence Program, University of Notre Dame

Azim N. Khamisa
Author, Activist, and Inspirational Speaker

Gene Steuerle
Ecomist & Author, The Urban Institute

John E. Tropman
Professor, University of Michigan

Wilhelm Verwoerd
Author and Editor

Dr. Sakena Yacoobi
Founder, Afghan Institute of Learning and 2014 Nobel Peace Prize nominee

Facilitated by: 

  • Etta Cetera, Artist/Activist
  • Anu Jain, University of Pittsburgh
  • Kaleen Tison Povis, UPCLOSE Learning Researcher
  • Dr. Steven E. Sokol, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

Registration
This event is limited to members of either the Children’s Museum or the World Affairs Council. Seating is limited.

Reception to follow. 

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Summer Seminar on Global Issues
Summer Seminar on Global Issues
July 7-18, 2014

July 7, 2014

University of Pittsburgh

We live in an interdependent world. No matter the career you’re considering, our changing world means that you will need to be globally fluent in order to compete and collaborate successfully in the future.

The Summer Seminar on Global Issues is designed to help students understand and think critically about their world—and the various issues, connections, and perspectives within it. Created for students entering their junior or senior year in high school, this innovative program is a two-week, interactive course focusing on both contemporary global issues and critical language skills. Through problem-solving activities and discussions with experts, participants will strengthen their understanding of overarching global issues and how these issues shape the world around them. Students will acquire greater global competence, cross-cultural understanding, and language proficiency—key skills needed to succeed in a global knowledge economy.

The Summer Seminar will be held July 7-18, 2014 (Monday-Friday) at the University of Pittsburgh. Each day will run from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm. The program is sponsored jointly by the World Affairs Council, and the University Center for International Studies and the Global Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh.

The program is sponsored jointly by the World Affairs Council, and the University Center for International Studies and the Global Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh.

This project is part of Pittsburgh City of Learning, an initiative of The Sprout Fund.

Who can participate?

Current sophomores and juniors are encouraged to apply for this program.

How much does it cost?

The Summer Seminar is being offered at a subsidized rate of $400 per person for students in the Pittsburgh region.

Full and partial needs-based financial aid scholarships will be available.

Out-of-state and international students should contact Emily Markham by emailing emily@worldpittsburgh.org or calling 412-281-7027.

Please note: Participants must bring a bag lunch each day. Students must also arrange for their own transportation.

What can participants expect?

  • Learn about a range of interdisciplinary global issues including health, the environment, human rights, security, and diplomacy.
  • Work with nationally and internationally ranked experts representing the academic, think tank, business, nonprofit, and government sectors on a range of global  and regional issues.
  • Develop 21st century skills including problem solving, analysis, and critical thinking.
  • Participate in real-world scenarios and simulations.
  • Acquire introductory skills in a critical world language (Arabic or Mandarin Chinese).
  • Use social media to create a meaningful portfolio and connect with peers abroad.
  • Explore global issues through film, literature, and art.

Sample schedule

  • 9:00 am - 10:30 am: Critical Language Study
  • 10:30 am - Noon: Global Issues Course
  • Noon - 1:00 pm: Lunch
  • 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm: Interactive Activities*

*A variety of supplemental activities will be incorporated into the Global Issues course instruction, including simulation exercises, discussions with expert speakers, and field trips.

How can students apply?

To be considered for admission to the Summer Seminar on Global Issues, a student must submit an application and reference. For financial aid scholarships, a student must also complete a separate scholarship application form.

Students are encouraged to complete the application and reference form online through the links provided; however, materials will also be accepted by mail

The application deadline is April 30, 2014. Applicants will be notified by mid-May.  

Apply now!

Questions?  

Please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council at 412-281-7027 or at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

         

 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

17th Annual  Summer Institute  for Teachers
17th Annual Summer Institute for Teachers - Teaching Contemporary Global Issues
June 24-26, 2014

A Unique Opportunity for Educators

June 24, 2014

8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Registration for this event is closed. If you have questions, please contact Emily Markham, Program Officer, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at
412-281-7027 or email emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Duquesne University

Continuing Professional Education Credit available for this course through Allegheny Intermediate Unit, pending approval by the  Pennsylvania Department of Education

Graduate credit available through Duquesne University’s School of Education

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Angela Bruce-Raeburn, a Program Officer with the Stanley Foundation overseeing its Human Protection Programming
     
  • Ms. Sarah Stephens, Executive Director of the Center for Democracy in the Americas
     
  • Rear Admiral David Titley, Director of the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at Pennsylvania State University

The Summer Institute for Teachers will:

  • help teachers to update their content knowledge, access resources necessary to prepare students for their futures, and create innovative lesson plans and curricula.

and will provide:

  • information on contemporary global issues
  • a framework for looking at international issues that reflects their highly complex and interrelated nature
  • additional resources which teachers can access to enhance existing curricula and to support understanding of global issues throughout the academic year
  • methods of integrating new knowledge into lesson plans and other experience-based classroom activities designed to enhance the effectiveness of world affairs education

What is the Summer Institute for Teachers?

The Institute is a three-day workshop which consists of briefings from experts on contemporary world affairs, small group problem solving exercises, and lesson-planning sessions with direct application to your curriculum.

What are this year’s proposed topics?

This year’s workshops will focus on a variety of global issues that may include transnational threats, nuclear non-proliferation, rising powers, and regional studies such as South America or Central and Eastern Europe. 

When is the Institute?

June 24 – 26, 2014 (Tuesday – Thursday)
8:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Where will the Institute be held?

Canevin Hall, Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Who can attend?

Middle and high school teachers, administrators, and gifted education coordinators are invited to attend the Institute.

Why is the Institute relevant?

The world is changing rapidly and sifting through information is overwhelming.

This course will provide an update on important international issues, help you to develop a framework for critical thinking and problem-solving, and facilitate the creation of lesson plans and materials.

What is the cost of the Institute?

There is a $35 non-refundable registration fee for the Institute.

This fee helps cover the cost of materials, as well as breakfast and lunch each day.

Those seeking Continuing Professional Education credit are also responsible for the processing fee of $40 to the Allegheny Intermediate Unit. A separate application for CPE credit will be distributed at the Institute.

Registration for this event is closed. If you have questions, please contact Emily Markham, Program Officer, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at
412-281-7027 or email emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

This Institute is made possible in part through generous support of the Henry C. Frick Educational Fund of The Buhl Foundation

About the World Affairs Council
Established in 1931, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting a deeper understanding of key contemporary international issues throughout Western Pennsylvania in an effort to increase the region’s global competence so that it can better compete and collaborate in the 21st century global environment.

Through its global education programs, the Council aims to prepare students throughout the region to succeed in an interdependent world, and provides content for educators and works with them to develop curricula on a range of global issues.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Fracking ¯ With Liberty and Justice for All
Fracking — With Liberty and Justice for All

Dr. John Detweiler
Marcellus Protest
             
Hon. Rich Fitzgerald
County Executive, Allegheny County

Dr. Kent Moors
Executive Chair, Global Energy Symposium

John M. Smith, Esq.
Partner and Founder, Smith Butz  

Moderated by:

Bill Flanagan
Executive Vice President, Corporate Relations
Allegheny Conference on Community Development

March 12, 2014

Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
Screening begins at 6:30 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Before energy becomes an international issue, it is a local one. It has a dramatic impact on the socioeconomics and daily life of Western Pennsylvania. As such, the ongoing — and often controversial — conversation around “fracking” and other means of natural gas extraction demands a space for dialogue, communication, and mutual respect on a community level.

On March 12, join Bricolage Production Company and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh for a special screening and panel discussion that delves deep into one of the most pressing issues affecting our region and the global conversation on energy development and sustainability.

Registration
There is a $15 charge for this event.

To register, visit www.bricolagepgh.org!

No-shows and cancellations after March 10, 2014 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Understanding Modern Day Slavery:  Pittsburgh¯s Role in Finding a Solution
Understanding Modern Day Slavery:
Pittsburgh’s Role in Finding a Solution

Special Screening of Not My Life and Panel Discussion

March 19, 2014

5:00-7:00 p.m.
Doors will open at 4:30 p.m.

Bricolage Production Company, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Program Wait List
Due to the popularity of this program, we have added a wait list. Please use this registration form if you would like to be added to the wait list.

Human trafficking, domestic servitude, forced labor, and child soldiers are just a few forms of modern day slavery affecting vulnerable populations—women and children especially—around the world. While often hidden, these exploitive practices are in fact present in the United States—and even Western Pennsylvania.

In recognition of International Women’s Day, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, the YWCA Greater Pittsburgh, and Bricolage Production Company have joined together to bring awareness to human trafficking and other acts of exploitation. These are issues of tremendous importance both locally and around the world.

Join us on March 19 for a salon screening of the documentary Not My Life and a discussion that builds on the topics of human trafficking and forced labor, among other related crimes, and the work being done on the local level to address these issues. Who is being exploited? What are the signs? What can you do to help? 

A panel will be moderated by Deb Acklin, President and CEO of WQED Multimedia, and will include Elizabeth Echevarria, CEO and Founder of Living in Liberty; Anne Rackow, Planning and Evaluation Manager of the Project to End Human Trafficking and Co-Facilitator of the Western PA Human Trafficking Coalition; and Greg Bristol, retired FBI Special Agent featured in the film Not My Life.

Filmed on five continents and in dozens of countries, Not My Life takes an in depth look at human trafficking on a global scale. The documentary showcases regions of the world, including the United States, where millions of children are exploited every day.

Program Wait List
Due to the popularity of this program, we have added a wait list. Please use this registration form if you would like to be added to the wait list.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

With special thanks to the Eden Hall Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Tools for the Digital Age
Tools for the Digital Age:
A Seminar for Educators with Google

March 11, 2014

4:00 – 5:30 p.m.

Google Pittsburgh Offices, Bakery Square, 6425 Penn Ave., #700, Pittsburgh, PA 15206

How can educators best use the latest digital tools in their classrooms? How can teachers connect to resources around the world using Google products? Which tools are most effective at engaging learners?                      

During this seminar, Google’s education team will introduce and demonstrate new educational tools and resources that teachers can use to enhance their teaching and engage students. These will include “Connected Classrooms” that enable students to take virtual field trips; the “Google Cultural Institute,” which allows students to discover exhibits and collections from museums and archives around the world; “Constitute,” a digital collection of constitutions from across the globe; “Google Maps for Education” that give students access to mapping tools; and, “Hangouts” to connect students with classrooms and speakers internationally.

This seminar is available free-of-charge for all K-12 educators, educational technologists, and school administrators. A limited number of complimentary tickets are available for educators to attend the evening public lecture at the Kelly Strayhorn Theater with Ross LaJeunesse, Global Head of Free Expression and International Relations at Google.

ACT 48 hours (up to 3 hours) will be available (pending approval).

Additional confirmation materials will be sent by email prior to the event.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact, Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973, or e-mail amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

This event is part of the World Affairs Councils of America’s Engage America Series and is supported through a grant from Google, Inc


 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Importance of Being Partners: Japan, the U.S., and Navigating the Asia-Pacific
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
What Ever Happened to Japan? A New Look at U.S.-Japan Relations

His Excellency Ichiro Fujisaki
President of the America-Japan Society, Inc.
Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States (2008-2012)

March 19, 2014

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

The Mozart Room at Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

The American strategic recalibration toward the Asia-Pacific — otherwise known as the “Asia Pivot” — is now well-documented, but the stakes have never been higher. With some four billion people within its general parameters, the region is as much a trendsetter as it is a flashpoint in geopolitics. From the ongoing tension between China and Japan over disputed islands in the South China Sea, to natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan, to emerging economies, the Asia-Pacific presents very complex challenges and opportunities.

As such, allies are increasingly important. The United States and Japan are now partners in an ever-evolving geopolitical puzzle of conflicting interests, millennia-old rivalries, power balances, and more. Once relatively disparaged as a declining, debt-ridden economic monolith unable to pack a punch, the island nation of some 130 million is staging a comeback. Japan has reinvigorated its economy, repositioned its foreign policy, and developed its power projection in the region through the increasingly autonomous Self-Defense Force.

How will Japan navigate the Asia-Pacific’s dramatic trajectory? What does it mean for Japan to be a regional leader when its “neighborhood” contains roughly half of the world’s population? Join the World Affairs Council and the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania for an exploration of Japan’s 21st century resurgence with its former top diplomat in the United States.

Amb. Ichiro Fujisaki is the former Ambassador of Japan to the United States. His distinguished career has been closely linked to the United States for over five decades: He studied one year each at Brown University and later Stanford University's Graduate School, and served as the political minister of the Embassy of Japan in Washington, D.C., from 1995 to 1999. As a diplomat, he has also served in Jakarta, London, and Paris (OECD). Previously, he served as Japan’s Ambassador to the United Nations and to the World Trade Organization in Geneva. In this post, he served as the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. In the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Tokyo, he has held such posts as Deputy Director-General for Asian Affairs and Director-General for North American Affairs before being appointed as the Deputy Foreign Minister. He has also served as the Sherpa (or the personal representative) of the Prime Minister to G8 Summit meetings.

Registration
JASP and WAC members: $50 | Non-members of either organization: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after March 14, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

In partnership with the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

Lessons from Afghanistan: The Future of Special Operations Forces
Breakfast Briefing
Lessons from Afghanistan: The Future of Special Operations Forces

Linda Robinson
Senior International Policy Analyst, RAND Corportation
Author of One Hundred Victories: Special Ops and the Future of American Warfare

March 4, 2014

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Once primarily the subject of video games and popular novels, Special Forces have once again captured America’s attention. In the wake of Operation Neptune Spear, a mission that killed al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden, the now famous Seal Team Six is one facet of the growing curiosity about what these advanced and highly skilled units do on a daily basis.

Particularly in Afghanistan, Special Operations teams continue to be a critical component when combating an insurgency that has proven to be as resilient as it is determined. The Special Operations playbook is expanding from top secret missions to public relations — and virtually everything in between.

In One Hundred Victories: Special Ops and the Future of American Warfare, RAND senior analyst Linda Robinson explores the nature of Special Operations in the context of the conflict in Afghanistan as well as its general role in 21st century American power projection. While the philosophy behind “Special Ops” dates back millennia, the utilization, training, methods, and objectives have perhaps never been more compelling.

What role will Special Operations play as the U.S. navigates a shifting geopolitical order? Whither Special Forces as U.S. military and power projection meet 21st century challenges? Join the World Affairs Council and a veteran security analyst for an exploration of a captivating and evolving element of American warfighting.

Linda Robinson is a senior international policy analyst at the RAND Corporation. Her most recent book is One Hundred Victories: Special Ops and the Future of American Warfare.She was senior adviser to the AFPAK Center at USCENTCOM from 2010 to 2011, and author of a Council on Foreign Relations special report on the future of special operations forces (2013) and a book on village stability operations in Afghanistan (2013). She is also the author of Tell Me How This Ends: General David Petraeus and the Search for a Way Out of Iraq (2008), Masters of Chaos: The Secret History of the Special Forces (2004), and Intervention or Neglect: The United States and Central America Beyond the 1980s (1991). She is on the board of the National Defense University, chair of the U.S. Army War College board, and a senior fellow at Joint Special Operations University.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $25 | Non-Members: $45

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

No-shows and cancellations after February 28, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 

Register Now!

amb_fujisaki
Special Seminar and Video Conference
A Look at Japan in 2014: A Conversation with Ambassador Ichiro Fujisaki, Former Ambassador of Japan to the United States

March 19, 2014

9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Video Conference hosted by
Shaler Area High School

Japan has made the headlines on numerous occasions in the past several years. Domestically, regions affected by the 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster continue to recover. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has advocated “Abenomics” – policies with the potential to ensure long-term growth for the Japanese economy based in the three pillars of monetary policy, fiscal stimulus, and structural reforms. Internationally, tensions have flared between China and Japan in light of the Senkaku – Diaoyu island dispute.

During this special seminar, students will hear from Amb. Ichiro Fujisaki, former Japanese Ambassador to the United States (2008-2012) on all of these issues and more. Amb. Fujisaki will address important questions related to Japan’s future. What implications do “Abenomics” have for the global economy? What does the United States’ “pivot” to Asia mean for Japan and Asian relations more broadly? Finally, how is Japan rebuilding following the 3/11 disaster?

Amb. Ichiro Fujisaki is the former Ambassador of Japan to the United States. He served as the political minister of the Embassy of Japan in Washington, DC, from 1995-99 and also studied one year each at Brown University and Stanford University Graduate School. As a diplomat, he has also served in Jakarta, Paris (OECD), and London. Previously, he served as Ambassador to the UN and to the WTO in Geneva. While there, he served as the Chairman of the Executive Committee of UNHCR (UN High Commissioner for Refugees). In the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Tokyo, he has held such posts as Deputy Director-General for Asian Affairs and Director-General for North American Affairs before being appointed as the Deputy Foreign Minister. He has also served as the Sherpa, or the personal representative, of the Prime Minister to G8 Summit meetings.

Participation at Shaler Area High School
Click here to register.

Participation via Video Conference
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Additional confirmation materials will be sent by email prior to the event.

Questions?
Please call Elizabeth Cook at 412-224-4339, or email elizabeth@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

Ross LaJeunesse Global Head of Free Expression and International Relations Google
Freedom and Power in the Digital Age

Ross LaJeunesse
Global Head of Free Expression and International Relations
Google

March 11, 2014

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Kelly Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh

Register Now!

In the last 25 years, the Internet has changed the way people access and share information, and has shifted the dynamics of societies around the globe. Those with a web connection have the potential to take any message and reach an audience of millions. But, this individual potential is only possible when the Internet is open and free for its users. More than 600 million Internet users - over 30% of the world's total Internet population - live in countries where there is substantial filtering or censorship of online content. Understanding what the Internet and online freedom mean for the world is critical for the future of democracy, human rights, and economic development everywhere.

Can 20th century institutions adapt to a 21st century global society? Is “change” synonymous with “progress”? Join the World Affairs Council and one of Google’s leading executives for an exploration of how we define freedom and power in a new era and what it means to be connected in today’s world.

Ross LaJeunesse is the Global Head of Free Expression and International Relations for Google. With twenty years of experience in politics and government affairs, he has worked for multiple administrations, including former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Mr. LaJeunesse was also Chief of Staff to California Controller Steve Westly, the state’s chief financial officer. He began his career as an assistant to U.S. Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell and went on to serve on the staff of Senator Edward M. Kennedy. Mr. LaJeunesse received his law degree with honors from the Harvard Law School. He received a B.A. in Asian Studies from Dartmouth College.

Registration
This event is FREE. Registration is preferred, but walk-ins are welcome.

World Affairs Council events are open to the public.

Register Now!

This event is part of the World Affairs Councils of America’s Engage America Series and is supported through a grant from Google, Inc.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ancient Faiths in Modern Life:  Understanding Contemporary World Religions  Panel Discussion and Video Conference
Panel Discussion and Video Conference
Ancient Faiths in Modern Life: Understanding Contemporary World Religions

Moderator:
Rev. Dr. Randy Bush
Senior Pastor
East Liberty Presbyterian Church

Featuring:

Annie Durrani
Program Director
Council on American-Islamic Relations
Pennsylvania (CAIR-PA) Pittsburgh Chapter

Sanjay Mehta
Co-Coordinator of Religion, Culture and Youth Programs, Hindu Jain Temple
and General Secretary
World Hindu Council of America

Rabbi Ronald Symons
Director of Lifelong Learning and Director of the Tikkun Olam Center for Jewish Social Justice
Temple Sinai

February 19, 2014

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Hosted by Baldwin High School

Register Now!

How does one’s faith influence his or her values, beliefs, and daily life? What commonalities are shared across world religions? What challenges do believers face in practicing their faiths? What are the unique characteristics of faith communities in the Pittsburgh region? How have ancient religious practices transformed due to shifts in lifestyle and technology?

For this panel discussion and video conference, students will hear from faith and community leaders to take a closer look at contemporary world religions. Panelists will share their perspectives during a roundtable discussion followed by Q&A.

Additional confirmation materials will be sent by email prior to the event.

Registration
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference.  Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register now.

Questions?
Please call Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973, or e-mail amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Finding Common Ground: Sustaining America¯s Energy Future
Finding Common Ground:
Sustaining America’s Energy Future

Special screening of the Rational Middle and discussion with director and producer Gregory Kallenberg

February 24, 2014

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Join Bricolage and the World Affairs Council on February 24 for an evening of film and discussion about the importance of energy and the value of compromise.

Created as a “foundation of information,” the Rational Middle Energy Series is an initiative born out of the artistic creation of director and producer Gregory Kallenberg in order to offer a variety of perspectives. While the issue of energy and sustainability can be polarizing one that often separates equally passionate opinions and perspectives, the goal of the Rational Middle is to encourage a dialogue based on mutual respect.

With its history and resources, Western Pennsylvania is a national and international leader in energy, and should be at the forefront of dialogue concerning energy. As energy needs only continue to grow, our collective ability to understand and embrace the importance and necessity of energy will only be more pressing as we move further into the future.

Gregory Kallenberg is the director and a producer of the Rational Middle Energy Series. Before working on the Rational Middle, he directed and produced Haynesville: A Nation’s Hunt for an Energy Future, a documentary chronicling a large natural gas discovery in northwest Louisiana and its effect on three individuals’ lives. Mr. Kallenberg has also spoken about the future of energy at engagements around the globe, including TEDx. Mr. Kallenberg’s background includes writing and story editing for the award-winning production house Bluefield Productions. He has also written for Esquire Magazine, the New York Times, the Austin American Statesman, and other publications.

Registration
There is a $15 charge for this event. Refreshments are included.
Seating is limited and registration is required.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Gregory Kallenberg
Discussion and Video Conference
Searching for a Rational Energy Policy

February 25, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Hosted by Elizabeth Forward High School

Earth is home to more than 7 billion people. As this population continues to grow over the next century, consumption of energy is expected to increase dramatically. In order to ensure the availability of energy resources in the future and limit damage to the environment, communities need to start working together toward a cleaner energy future. While politicians in Washington are highly polarized on the subject of energy, there is a growing group of people willing and eager to come together and compromise on what a cleaner energy future might look like. This group is the “rational middle,” a term coined by Gregory Kallenberg, director of the Rational Middle Energy Series. Using a series of short videos highlighting global and domestic energy consumption, Mr. Kallenberg seeks to build a foundation of knowledge for the growing “rational middle” in their effort to find common ground. During this discussion and video conference, students will hear from Mr. Kallenberg about his motivation for the series and the importance of finding a middle ground in the energy debate. Students will take part in a global discussion and learn about goals and challenges for a cleaner energy future.

Gregory Kallenberg is the director and a producer of the “Rational Middle Energy Series.” Before this project, Mr. Kallenberg directed and produced “Haynesville: A Nation’s Hunt for an Energy Future,” a documentary chronicling a large natural gas discovery in northwest Louisiana and its effect on three individuals’ lives. Mr. Kallenberg has also spoken about the future of energy at engagements across the globe including TEDx, Bucknell University’s Environmental Symposium on Shale Gas, and Rice University’s “Distinguished Speaker’s Series.” Mr. Kallenberg’s background includes writing and story editing for the award-winning production house Bluefield Productions. He has also written for Esquire Magazine, the New York Times, and the Austin American Statesman, among other publications.

Registration
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register now.

Additional confirmation materials will be sent by email prior to the event.

Questions?
Please call Emily Markham at 412-281-7027, or email emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

usawc 2014
National Security Issues:
From Religion, War, and Culture, to the Liberty of Conscience

Global Issues Briefing with Panelists from the United States Army War College

January 29, 2014

7:00 - 8:45 p.m.

Mount Lebanon Public Library, 16 Castle Shannon Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15228

This program is a joint presentation by World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Mt. Lebanon Public Library.

The Eisenhower Fellows will return to Mt. Lebanon Public Library to discuss pressing national security issues facing the United States currently and in the future.

Eisenhower Fellows will include:

  • Col. Matt Molineux, US Air Force
  • Col. Kelly Ivanoff, US Army
  • Lt. Col. Rob Borcherding, US Army
  • Lt. Col. Timothy Mallard, US Army
  • Cmdr. Tony Conley, US Navy
  • Lt. Col. Steve Van Riper, US Marine Corps

Topics will include:

  • "Religion, War and Culture: The Vital Role of Religious Issues in Joint Operations Today"
  • "What Do I Believe? Liberty of Conscience as the Bedrock of Democracy"
  • "The Responsibility to Protect: An Emerging International Norm Challenging State Sovereignty"
  • "Is the United States Still at War with al Qaeda?  Afghanistan and Beyond" (Ivanoff)
  • "The Military Community - Who we are, How we're different, and What that means to you" (Van Riper)
  • "Sexual Harassment & Assault - similarities between the military and college communities, and how the military is dealing with it"
  • "Energy Security - What is DoD Pursuing and Why?"
  • "Nuclear Weapons - Strategy Recommendations for the 21st Century"

To register, please call 412-531-1912 or email events@mtlebanonlibrary.org.

 

A Look at National Security in 2014:  New Challenges and Opportunities
A Look at National Security in 2014
New Challenges and Opportunities

Global Issues Briefing with Panelists from the United States Army War College

January 28, 2014

7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

Peters Township Public Library, 616 East McMurray Road, McMurray, PA 15317

This program is a joint presentation by World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, Peters Township Public Library, and McMurray Veterans of Foreign Wars POST 764

The nature of national security has become increasingly more complicated in 2014 and includes issues ranging from nuclear proliferation to the influence of culture on conflict. During this national security briefing, senior officers representing the United States Army, Navy and Marine Corps will brief the audience on a variety of national security issues including the growth of nuclear weapons in the 21st century; the influence of religious issues and conflicts on joint operations; the responsibility to protect doctrine and the challenge it poses to upholding state sovereignty; the future of the United States’ position in the Middle East and the war against Al Qaeda; and the men and women that make up the military community responding to these threats.

Register for this program online, at the library's circulation desk or call 724-941-9430.

 

The Ethical Dilemma Above: Drones and the 21st Century Security State
The Ethical Dilemma Above:
Drones and the 21st Century Security State

Staged reading of the play The Predator and panel discussion with:

Thomas Sanderson, Co-Director, Transnational Threats Project, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Daniel Simpson, Former U.S. Ambassador, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Columnist

February 10, 2014

7:00 p.m.| Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for a “Happy Half-Hour”

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412.281.1259.

UAVs, more commonly known as “drones,” come in many shapes and sizes — and perform various functions inside and outside the realm of security. Yet, perhaps the most popularly identified drone is the “Reaper,” a gray, angular machine with an ovular shaped head that has become synonymous with the unseen, the unheard, and the clandestine. Airstrikes performed by the Reaper targeting insurgents, militants, and terrorists the world over have led to a heated discourse about executive overreach, targeted killings, civilian casualties, and national defense.

As a lively debate unfolds concerning government transparency and control, the conversation around drones remains a complicated one. As a country, how do we reconcile the complex moral, ethical, and national security issues surrounding the use of drones? As a citizenry, are we comfortable with this relatively new form of warfare? Is there a line — and if so, where do we draw it?

On February 10, join us for a staged reading of The Predator, a play by Jack Gilroy that is being used by groups across the country to explore issues related to drone warfare and the militarization of the civilian realm. Following the reading, a panel of experts will examine this controversial issue and engage the audience in a discussion.

Thomas Sanderson is Co-Director and Senior Fellow for the Transnational Threats Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Specializing in terrorism, transnational crime, Central Asia, global trends, and intelligence issues, he has conducted field work in more than 60 countries. Mr. Sanderson has over 13 years of counter-terrorism experience, focusing on extremists, insurgents, foreign intelligence, and nongovernmental organizations. He has published in the Economist, New York Times, Washington Post, West Point CTC Sentinel, and the Harvard Asia Pacific Review, among others.

Daniel Simpson is a former career Foreign Service officer and current columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His career with the U.S. State Department spanned over three decades, during which he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Central African Republic from 1990-92, as well as Special Envoy to Somalia and U.S. Ambassador to Congo-Kinshasa from 1995-98. He has posted in Burundi, South Africa, Zaire, Iceland, Lebanon, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. He also served as the Deputy Commandant of the U.S. Army War College.

Registration
There is a $15 charge for this event. Refreshments are included.

No-shows and cancellations after February 3, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412.281.1259.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage.

In cooperation with the
Anti-Drone Warfare Coalition

 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Thomas Sanderson Co-director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats Project Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Terrorism and Insurgency: Understanding the Levant after the Arab Spring

Thomas Sanderson
Co-Director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats Project
Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

February 11, 2014

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

One region of the world is particularly shaped by the ongoing changes linked to the Arab Spring: the Levant. This region comprised of countries along the Eastern Mediterranean including Israel, Jordan, Palestine, and Syria deserves particular focus. With Egypt, Iraq, and Turkey forming its geopolitical perimeter, the Levant has witnessed a maelstrom of unrest and discord. For example, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has ebbed and flowed in intensity for nearly 70 years, yet the core debate surrounding the sovereignty of both Israel and Palestine still rages. The Syrian civil war demonstrates levels of brutality that have already claimed over 100,000 lives and left millions as refugees. As violence spreads throughout Lebanon, many lingering questions remain about its internal stability.

Operating within these conflicts are groups of “non-state actors” — groups of insurgents, terrorist organizations, confederated bands of extremists, militia, and others — who both contribute to instability and at times operate as proxy instruments for power brokers within the region. Some are more organized and influential than others. Hamas and Hezbollah are established, highly-developed groups that play important roles in regional politics, social reform, and media. Others such as the al Qaeda-linked Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, evolve and morph in scope and substance, yet their exports for violence and resiliency are pressing concerns for global security efforts.

Moving forward, what role will insurgency and terrorism continue to play in an area of the world that has already witnessed so much conflict and uncertainty? Join the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and a senior expert on transnational threats and counterterrorism as we focus on a region hanging in the balance.

Thomas Sanderson is Co-Director and Senior Fellow for the Transnational Threats Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Specializing in terrorism, transnational crime, Central Asia, global trends, and intelligence issues, he has conducted field work in more than 60 countries. Mr. Sanderson has over 13 years of counter-terrorism experience, focusing on extremists, insurgents, foreign intelligence, nongovernmental organizations, and academics. He has published in the Economist, New York Times, Washington Post, West Point CTC Sentinel, and the Harvard Asia Pacific Review. Mr. Sanderson holds a B.A. from Wheaton College in Massachusetts and an MA in law and diplomacy from Tufts University’s Fletcher School.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $50 | Non-members: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after February 7, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

¯The Way the World Is¯ The Fight Against Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking
“The Way the World Is”
The Fight Against Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking

Screening of the documentary Not My Life and discussion with the film’s Academy Award nominated director, Robert Bilheimer

January 27, 2014

7:00 p.m.

Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Join the World Affairs Council and Pittsburgh Filmmakers for an evening of film and conversation with  Academy Award nominee and director, Robert Bilheimer, who made the documentary Not My Life to “depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale.”

Filmed in a dozen countries, on five continents, Not My Life takes viewers into a world where millions of children are exploited, daily, through an array of practices including forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual violence, and child soldiering.

According to the United Nations Office of Drug and Crime, the magnitude and traffic flows of the modern slavery are hard to quantify as comprehensive data is difficult to both collect and aggregate. However, recent reports indicate that over 150 countries are either constructing or implementing human trafficking laws intended to curb the expansion of what is most certainly a global issue.

Still, the horrific situations to which countless children the world over are subjected are both sobering and troubling. What measures are being taken to mitigate modern slavery? Will there be an end to profiteering on the suffering of those who are most vulnerable?

Robert Bilheimer, President of the nonprofit Worldwide Documentaries, Inc., is widely regarded as one of the most influential filmmakers working in the field of international human rights. In 1989, Mr. Bilheimer was nominated for an Academy Award  for Cry of Reason, a feature-length documentary that profiles the South African anti-apartheid leader Beyers Naude. Since then, he has carefully crafted documentary films on a wide range of social, cultural, and humanitarian concerns. He earned his B.A. from Hamilton College and his M.A. in Theater and Film from Indiana University.

Registration
There is a $10 charge for this event.

No-shows and cancellations after January 22, 2014 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

A program of the World Affairs Councils of America, with support from the Carlson & Carlson Family Foundation.

In cooperation with Pittsburgh Filmmakers

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

KQV Global Press Conference
KQV Global Press Conference
Climate Change: An Unconventional Threat to National Security

September 21, 2014

10:30 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Dr. David Titley, Retired Rear Admiral with the US Navy and Director of the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at Pennsylvania State University. He will discuss "Climate Change: An Unconventional Threat to National Security” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 45,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

A Look at National Security in 2014:  New Challenges and Opportunities
Global Issues Seminar for Students with Panelists from the U.S. Army War College
A Look at National Security in 2014: New Challenges and Opportunities

Hempfield Area H.S.

January 30, 2014

9:15-11:40 a.m.
Panel Discussion

Hempfield Area H.S.
Greensburg, PA

The nature of national security has become increasingly more complicated in 2014 and includes issues ranging from nuclear proliferation to the influence of culture on conflict. During the seminars listed below, senior officers representing the United States Army, Navy and Marine Corps will brief students on a variety of national security issues including the growth of nuclear weapons in the 21st century; the influence of religious issues and conflicts on joint operations; the Responsibility to Protect doctrine and the challenge it poses to upholding state sovereignty; the future of the United States’ position in the Middle East and the war against Al Qaeda; and, the men and women that make up the military community responding to these threats.

There is NO CHARGE for the Global Issues Seminar. 

Limited space is available. Please register online or by phone as soon as possible.

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Registration
Click here to register online for this South Side Area H.S. program.

Questions?
Please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7027, or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Modern Day Slavery through the Eyes of Children
A Discussion with Robert Bilheimer, Director of the Documentary Not My Life
Modern Day Slavery through the Eyes of Children

Video Conference and Discussion

January 27, 2014

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Hosted by Woodland Hills High School

Human trafficking is a multi-billion dollar criminal industry forcing children around the world into a life of armed conflict, forced labor, and domestic servitude. In the documentary Not My Life, director Robert Bilheimer exposes viewers to the many different forms of human trafficking affecting children across the globe, leaving the audience with a greater awareness, a desire to take action, and hope for the future. Join us via video conference where students will hear from Mr. Bilheimer as he discusses his passion behind making the film and igniting a movement for change. Students will have a chance to ask questions and engage in a broader discussion surrounding human trafficking worldwide.

All participating schools are asked to screen the documentary in their class prior to the event, and will be mailed a copy of Not My Life upon registration.

Robert Bilheimer is President of Worldwide Documentaries and is one of the most influential documentary filmmakers working in the world today. He has made carefully crafted documentary films on a wide rage of social, cultural, and humanitarian concerns, which have been viewed on television and aired in theaters around the world. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a 1989 Academy Award nomination for Cry of Reason, a feature-length documentary that profiles the South African anti-apartheid leader Beyers Naude. Early in his career, Robert worked as a freelance journalist and as a professional theatre director. Mr. Bilheimer was born in New York City, and was educated at the International School in Geneva, Switzerland; Hamilton College (BA, English Literature); and Indiana University Graduate School (MA, Theatre and Film). From 1986 to 1988 he was a Resident Scholar at the Anson Phelps-Stokes Institute for Black American and Native American Studies in New York City. Mr. Bilheimer has also taught, lectured, and spoken at distinguished academic institutions around the world, including the Eastman School of Music, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Registration
Click here to register.

Limited space is available. Please register as soon as possible.

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7027, or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

A Look at National Security in 2014:  New Challenges and Opportunities
Global Issues Seminar for Students with Panelists from the U.S. Army War College
A Look at National Security in 2014: New Challenges and Opportunities

South Side Area H.S and Upper St. Clair H.S.

EVENTS CANCELED

January 28, 2014

This Global Issues Seminar will be held at two locations:

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
South Side Area H.S., Hookstown, PA
Panel Discussion

9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Upper St. Clair H.S., Pittsburgh, PA
Panel Discussion and Video Conference

These events have been canceled.

The nature of national security has become increasingly more complicated in 2014 and includes issues ranging from nuclear proliferation to the influence of culture on conflict. During the seminars listed below, senior officers representing the United States Army, Navy and Marine Corps will brief students on a variety of national security issues including the growth of nuclear weapons in the 21st century; the influence of religious issues and conflicts on joint operations; the Responsibility to Protect doctrine and the challenge it poses to upholding state sovereignty; the future of the United States’ position in the Middle East and the war against Al Qaeda; and, the men and women that make up the military community responding to these threats.

There is NO CHARGE for the Global Issues Seminar. 

Limited space is available. Please register online or by phone as soon as possible.

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Click here to register online for the South Side Area H.S. program.

Click here to register online for the Upper St. Clair H.S. program.

Click here to register online for the Upper St. Clair H.S. video conference.

These events have been canceled.

Questions?

Please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7027, or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

National Security Briefing for Teachers
National Security Briefing for Teachers

January 29, 2014

The nature of national security has become increasingly more complicated in 2014 and includes issues ranging from nuclear proliferation to the influence of culture on conflict. During this national security briefing, senior officers representing the United States Army, Navy and Marine Corps will brief teachers on a variety of national security issues including the growth of nuclear weapons in the 21st century; the influence of religious issues and conflicts on joint operations; the Responsibility to Protect doctrine and the challenge it poses to upholding state sovereignty; the future of the United States’ position in the Middle East and the war against Al Qaeda; and, the men and women that make up the military community responding to these threats.

ACT 48 hours (5) will be available (pending approval).

Registration
Click here to register now!

There is NO CHARGE for this teacher workshop. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Limited space is available. Please register online or by phone as soon as possible.

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7027, or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

Reza Marashi
A Closer Look at the Nuclear Deal with Iran
Video Conference

Mr. Reza Marashi
Research Director
National Iranian American Council

December 5, 2013

10:15 — 11:30 a.m. (EST)

Video Conference hosted by McKeesport Area High School

The phone conversation earlier this fall between U.S. President Barak Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani represented the first time leaders of each country had communicated since 1979.Last week, U.S. President Barack Obama announced that a temporary, six-month-long deal has been struck between Iran and the international coalition of negotiators during the P5+1 talks in Geneva. Broadly speaking, Iran will halt development on its nuclear program and take measures to dilute its stock of weaponized uranium in order to receive some relief on international sanctions that have been crippling to its economy. 

It comes as no surprise the response to these developments have been mixed. Some experts speculate this deal is dead on arrival to the U.S. Congress. Others believe this is the first time real progress has been in made between the West and Iran in decades. The spectrum of opinions will undoubtedly multiply as the world watches in eager anticipation to what could potentially be — according to President Obama — “a new path toward a world that is more secure.”

Will diplomacy work? Can a long standing deal between the West and Iran sustain itself and not be subject the myriad geopolitical factors pressuring it from all angles? Or will this development encourage more countries to develop nuclear weapons in the Middle East and cause strains with long-standing allies?

Mr. Reza Marashi is Research Director at the National Iranian American Council. He came to the National Iranian American Council after four years in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to his tenure at the State Department, he was an analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies covering China-Middle East issues, and a Tehran-based private strategic consultant on Iranian political and economic risk. Mr. Marashi is frequently consulted by Western governments on Iran-related matters. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, and The National Interest, among other publications. He has been a guest contributor to CNN, NPR, the BBC, TIME Magazine, The Washington Post, and the Financial Times, among other broadcast outlets.

Registration
Click here to register now

Questions?
For questions, please contact Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or email amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Jack Gerard President and CEO, American Petroleum Institute
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
“America’s Energy Choice”

Jack Gerard
President and CEO, American Petroleum Institute

January 22, 2014

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Energy is changing the geopolitical system. In many ways, access to and the supply of energy is quickly becoming the harbinger of a newly restructured global power balance. It may also be one of the 21st century’s great equalizers.

Relegated to the backburner only a decade ago, “energy security” is now at the forefront of the global agenda. For strong nations, risings powers, and developing countries alike, a broad and well-developed energy mix is necessary to maintain this security. As such, a single solution to these complex energy challenges remains elusive. The post-Fukishima response has propelled countries to explore the possibilities of renewable energy with more fervor. The well-documented global shale gas boom has many wondering how the world’s energy landscape will look in the wake of an unconventional gas revolution. This is all in light of some forecasts indicating the world’s dependence on coal, nuclear, and oil have perhaps never been as dire. Energy security shapes our modern markets, establishes legitimacy, and holds the keys to a prosperous future.

With an abundance of energy sources, what decisions must the U.S. make to further establish and maintain its own energy security? Is energy resurrecting American power and influence that was once considered on its last leg only a few short years ago? Join the Council and one the U.S. energy sector’s most senior leaders for a discussion on what U.S. energy security means for the future of America and the future of the world.

Jack N. Gerard is President and CEO of the American Petroleum Institute (API), the national trade association that represents all aspects of America’s oil and natural gas industry. Mr. Gerard has led API since November 2008, expanding its membership and influence in all 50 states and globally, enabling API to better inform the public and policymakers on important energy issues. Prior to joining API, Mr. Gerard served as President and CEO of the American Chemistry Council, and earlier held the same position at the National Mining Association. He also spent close to a decade working in the U.S. Congress. In 1990, Mr. Gerard co-founded McClure, Gerard & Neuenschwander, Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based government relations consulting firm. He is recognized by numerous publications and his peers as one of Washington's most influential advocates.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $45 | Non-members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after January 17, 2014 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Negotiating with Tehran: Historic Achievement or Historic Mistake?
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Negotiating with Tehran: Historic Achievement or Historic Mistake?

Reza Marashi
Research Director
National Iranian American Council

Ahmad K. Majidyar
Senior Research Associate
American Enterprise Institute

December 6, 2013

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

The recent deal over Iran’s nuclear program created an enormous buzz throughout the international community. The already controversial debate has ratcheted up to new levels of intensity after U.S. President Barack Obama announced on the evening of Saturday, November 23, that a temporary, six-month-long deal has been struck between Iran and the international coalition of negotiators. Broadly speaking, Iran agreed to halt development of its nuclear program and take measures to dilute its stock of weaponized uranium in order to receive some relief on international sanctions that have been crippling to its economy.

The response to these developments is mixed. Some experts speculate this deal buys time for Iran to build a nuclear weapon. Others believe this is the first time real progress has been made between the West and Iran in decades. The spectrum of opinions will undoubtedly multiply as the world watches in eager anticipation to what could potentially be — according to President Obama — “a new path toward a world that is more secure.”

Will diplomacy work? Can a long standing deal between the West and Iran sustain itself and not break under the geopolitical pressures? Join the Council and two veteran Iran experts as we examine the challenges and opportunities surrounding these negotiations.

Reza Marashi recently returned from Geneva, Switzerland, the location of the most recent P5 + 1 talks. He joined the National Iranian American Council in 2010. Previously, he worked in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. State Department. He also was an analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies monitoring China-Middle East issues. Mr. Marashi also served as a Tehran-based private strategic consultant on Iranian political and economic risk. He has published in the New York Times, National Interest, Atlantic, and Foreign Policy. He has been a guest contributor to the BBC, CNN, NPR, ABC News, TIME Magazine, and Financial Times.

Ahmad Rajidyar is a Senior Research Associate at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. He studies political and security affairs in South Asia and the Middle East, with a special focus on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iran. He also travels frequently to military bases across the U.S. to instruct senior American Army and Marine officers about culture, religion, and domestic politics in Afghanistan, and about terrorist groups operating in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Before joining AEI in 2008, Mr. Majidyar worked as a media analyst with BBCMonitoring in Kabul, and served as an aid worker with the United Nations agency for refugees in Pakistan.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $45 | Non-members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after December 4, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Remove Image  Karen Harbert, President and CEO, Institute for 21st Century Energy Institute, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
KQV Global Press Conference
Understanding the Global Energy Market

September 20, 2014

7:00 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Karen Harbert, President and CEO, Institute for 21st Century Energy Institute, U.S. Chamber of Commerce.She will discuss "Understanding the Global Energy Market” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 45,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

middle east 2014
Middle East 2014:
The Year of Living Dangerously

Lee Smith
Visiting Fellow
Hudson Institute

Tony Badran
Research Fellow
Foundation for the Defense of Democracies (FDD)

December 2, 2013

7:00 p.m.

Jewish Community Center, 5738 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. For more information, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

This fall President Bashar al-Assad called the Middle East “a powder keg.” The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh's Community Relations Council will explore the facts underlying that figure of speech at a forum featuring internationally-known Middle East experts Tony Badran, Research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) in Washington, DC., and Lee Smith, Visiting Fellow at Hudson Institute. 

Tony Badranis a Research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) in Washington, DC. The FDD, Mr. Badran’s organization, focuses on eradicating terrorism. Founded shortly after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, by a group of former U.S. officials and philanthropists, the FDD seeks to balance civil liberties with the protection of human life. Born and raised in Lebanon, Badran specializes in Lebanon, Syria and Hezbollah.With the Syrian civil war in the spotlight, in 2013 Badran has testified numerous times before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.Badran’s writings appear regularly in a range of publications including the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, ForeignPolicy.com, ForeignAffairs.com and The Weekly Standard, among others, and he writes a weekly commentary for NOW Lebanon, a news site that covers the Middle East.

Lee Smith is a Visiting Fellow at Hudson Institute, a nonpartisan policy-research organization that seeks to guide policy makers in government and business. Smith has worked at a number of journals, magazines and publishers, including the Hudson Review, the Ecco Press, Atheneum, Grand Street, GQ Magazine, and Talk Magazine. He was also editor-in-chief of the Voice Literary Supplement, the Village Voice's national monthly literary magazine. Smith has been a guest on radio and television, including Fox News, and National Public Radio. He is a prolific writer, contributing articles on Arab and Islamic affairs to, among other publications, the New York Times, the New Republic, the Weekly Standard, Slate.com, the Boston Globe, and Wired. His book on Arab societies, The Strong Horse: Power, Politics, and the Clash of Arab Civilizations, was published by Doubleday in January 2010.

Online registration is closed. For more information, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Sponsored by:

    


Additional Sponsors:

  

 

AWQ Logo
Academic WorldQuest

12th Annual International Knowledge Competition for High School Students

February 7, 2014

Registration: 9:00-9:30 a.m.
Program: 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Lunch will be provided

Soldiers and Sailors National Military Museum and Memorial, Oakland

In cooperation with the International Business Center Katz Graduate School of Business University of Pittsburgh

Academic WorldQuest is a knowledge-based competition with questions focusing on international affairs, current events, the global economy, geography, world history, and general knowledge about the world.
 

Who Can Play?
This is a team competition.Teams consist of four high school students from the same school.In order to allow for as many schools as possible to participate, only one team per school district is permitted to enter the competition.

This event is offered at NO CHARGE and is open to teams of high school studentsand their accompanying teachers or chaperones.

What Topics Will Be Covered?

  • Round 1: World Cultures
  • Round 2: Geography and Flags
  • Round 3: Cybersecurity
  • Round 4: The World in the 2000s
  • Round 5: Global Economy and Business
  • Round 6: People in the News
  • Round 7: Current Events
  • Round 8: Global Health
  • Round 9: Global Energy and the Environment

How Can Teams Prepare?
Click here to download the 2014 Academic WorldQuest preparation guide. This guide will explain the content of each round and provide suggested websites and resources to help teams prepare for the competition.

Click here to download a competition description and rules.

In addition, the Council will provide practice questions (and answers) on Facebook and Twitter. Become a fan of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @WorldPittsburgh for access to these special practice questions!

What is the Grand Prize?
The 1st place team will advance to the National Academic WorldQuest competition to be held in Washington, DC on April 26, 2014, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America. Participants at the national competition will enjoy a weekend of exciting activities and a discussion with a prominent speaker. These events, as well as transportation and hotel costs, will be covered for the winning team and one teacher sponsor or chaperone.

There will also be awards for 2nd and 3rd place teams.

How do Teams Register?
Registration is now closed. If you have questions, please contact Emily Markham at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412.281.7027 or  by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Thank you to our other sponsors:

        

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador Peter Tomsen Former U.S. Special Envoy to Afghanistan Author of The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers
Breakfast Briefing
The Afghan Conundrum: The United States and the Continuing Great Game in Central Asia

Ambassador Peter Tomsen
Former U.S. Special Envoy to Afghanistan
Author of The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

December 4, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

This past October marked the twelfth year of U.S. involvement in Afghanistan. For over a decade, the United States and its partners have been embroiled in an ongoing conflict involving all aspects and tactics of counterinsurgency, statecraft, international development, geopolitics, and myriad other complex dynamics. The resistance against the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and its various allies continues to be led by a multi-faceted and often difficult to identify collection of militant organizations, confederated bands of fighters, and the Afghan Taliban. To many. Colloquially-termed the “Graveyard of Empires” by some, Afghanistan soon moves into further transition — complicating what is an already difficult situation for both Afghans and the international community alike.

While the withdrawal of most ISAF forces is slated for December 2014, plenty will be happening before then. National elections are scheduled for April 5. Peace talks with the Afghan Taliban and affiliated groups ebb and flow. Meanwhile, the actual planning and implementation of the drawdown remains a significant undertaking. But what of the future of South and Central Asia post-2014? Is the region on the cusp of yet another “Great Game” — just with different players? Whither Afghans — those who have the most at stake — within this puzzle?

As Afghanistan and its neighbors remain at the nexus of a geopolitical crossroads, what implications will rise to the surface after U.S. forces draw down? Join the Council and a distinguished former American diplomat as we explore lingering issues and new beginnings for Afghanistan.

Ambassador Peter Tomsen spent 33 years serving U.S. diplomatic interests in South Asia, Central and East Asia, and the former Soviet Union. From 1989 to 1992, he was then-President George H.W. Bush's Special Envoy on Afghanistan with the rank of Ambassador. Amb. Tomsen was U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Armenia from 1995 to 1998. After retiring from the Foreign Service, he has been frequently called upon to speak on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and South Asia before Congress and to the media. He has published in Foreign Affairs, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Times, and other notable newspapers and journals. His book, The Wars of Afghanistan, was published in 2011. Amb. Tomsen has received numerous awards, including three Presidential Meritorious Service Awards, two Meritorious Honor Awards, and one State Department Superior Award. He is an alumnus of the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after December 1, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With support from the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Panel Discussion and Videoconference  Skills Training Made in Germany: The German ¯Dual¯ Education System
Panel Discussion and Video Conference
Skills Training Made in Germany: The German “Dual” Education System

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh,
AIU3, and Gateway High School
In partnership with the German Embassy and the American Council on Germany

November 19, 2013

8:30-9:45 a.m. (EST)

Video Conference

With the lowest youth unemployment rate in Europe at 7.7%, what is Germany doing right when it comes to educating young people?

A vocational training program can be the starting point for a successful career path. The German system of vocational education and training is evidence of this. Known for its unique combination of theory and practice, Germany's “dual system” - where students attend academic classes while receiving on-the-job training through a technical apprenticeship - creates workers who are able to fuel the German economy upon graduation. Additionally, as this system pairs industry directly with the education system, training can be adapted to the current needs of companies, alleviating skills gaps common in other Western countries, including the United States.

A panel of practitioners will demonstrate how this system works for Germany and for German companies around the world. The event will feature an American student and teacher who are currently benefiting from a similar model in a Virginia-based German company as well as a vocational teacher from Germany. Participants will have the opportunity to hear remarks and engage in discussion directly with the speakers.

Participation via Video Conference
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

International Student Summit  Loose Nukes: Facing the Threat of Nuclear Terrorism
International Student Summit
Loose Nukes: Facing the Threat of Nuclear Terrorism

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, AIU3, and McKeesport Area High School

December 5, 2013

9:00 — 11:30 a.m. (EST)

McKeesport Area High School and Videoconference

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia

Weapons-grade nuclear materials are stored at hundreds of sites scattered across nearly 30 countries worldwide. Many of these sites are well-secured, but some are not, leaving nuclear technology and material susceptible to theft, sabotage, or attack. Since the end of the Cold War, the international community has worked diligently to eliminate vulnerable nuclear sites, but many experts contend that a more coordinated effort is necessary.

This event will include remarks by Dr. Michael O’Hanlon, the Director of Research for the Foreign Policy Program at The Brookings Institution. Participants will consider key points for an International Conference on Nuclear Security convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Small groups of students will represent senior government officials, including high-level military leaders and senior diplomats, from both established nuclear power states and potential nuclear weapons states. Students will be charged with discussing an international framework to secure existing nuclear weapons and materials sites around the world. Discussion materials will be sent in advance of the program.

A limited number of schools can participate at McKeesport Area High School and via video conference.

Participation at McKeesport Area High School
Registrations will be accepted on a rolling basis until the program is filled. Additional students will be placed on a waiting list. Click here to register.

Participation via Videoconference
Registration is now closed. Please contact Amiena Mahsoob to be placed on the waiting list by emailing amiena@worldpittsburgh.orgor calling 412-398-8825

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Gen. Michael V. Hayden Former Director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency Principal, Chertoff Group
Live Webcast
In the Name of National Security:
Balancing Secrecy and Transparency

Gen. Michael V. Hayden
Former Director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency
Principal, Chertoff Group

November 18, 2013

9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

Videoconference and Onsite at Peters Township High School

The largest leaks of classified documents in American history have occurred in the past several years, exposing breaches in privacy by the National Security Agency. These leaks have significant implications for diplomatic relations between the United States and Germany and France, as well as other neighbors and partners, including Mexico and Brazil. How have these leaks impacted the intelligence community’s ability to do its job and keep Americans safe? What does privacy mean in an increasingly digitized world?

This event will provide high school students with the opportunity learn more about a topic which is making headline news. They will hear remarks from Gen. Hayden and engage in lively discussion onsite or via video conference.

Gen. Michael V. Hayden is the former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency. He is currently a Principal at the Chertoff Group and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at George Mason University. As Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2006-2009, Gen. Hayden oversaw the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America's adversaries, producing timely analysis for decision makers, and conducting covert operations to thwart terrorists and other enemies of the U.S. Before becoming Director of the CIA, Gen. Hayden served as the country's first Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence and was the highest-ranking intelligence officer in the armed forces. He also served as Commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center, Director of the National Security Agency and Chief of the Central Security Service. Gen. Hayden has appeared in the media on such shows as Charlie Rose, Meet the Press, This Week, Nightline, and CNN's Nightly News. A Pittsburgh native, he holds degrees from Duquesne University and did postgraduate work at the Defense Intelligence School.

Live Webcast
Click here to register.

Onsite Registration: Peters Township High School
Onsite registration has reached capacity.

Videoconference Registration
The videoconference has reached capacity. 

Questions?
Please call Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or email amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

One Billion Strong: Is China Struggling or Succeeding?
One Billion Strong: Is China Struggling or Succeeding?
Videoconference and Webcast Discussion

William Adams
Senior International Economist
PNC Financial Services Group

Damian Ma
Fellow
The Paulson Institute

October 11, 2013

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Videoconference Discussion Hosted by Avonworth High School

In the next decade, China’s economy is expected to surpass the United States as the largest in the world. However, the growing population of over one billion has put a strain on the economy and the resources needed to live day-to-day (food, energy, housing, etc.). What impact will this have on China over the next decade, and more importantly, why does this matter? During this videoconference, students will hear from Mr. Bill Adams, International Economist at PNC Financial Services Group, and Mr. Damien Ma, Fellow at The Paulson Institute, as they discuss these critical issues through the lens of their new book, In Line Behind A Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China’s Ascent in the Next Decade. Following the presentation, students will have the opportunity to participate in a Q&A with the experts.

William Adams is Assistant Vice President and Senior International Economist for the PNC Financial Services Group. His responsibilities include forecasting economic conditions and exchange rates, covering emerging Asia, the European Union, Canada, and Latin America. He joined PNC in July 2011 after serving as resident economist for The Conference Board China Center from 2009 to 2011. Mr. Adams lived in China for five of the past ten years and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese. He holds a master degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and is a graduate of Harvard College.

Damien Ma is a Fellow at The Paulson Institute, focused on investment and policy programs and the Institute's research and think tank activities. Previously, he was a Lead China Analyst at Eurasia Group. He specialized in analyzing the intersection between Chinese policies and markets, with a particular focus on energy and commodities, industrial policy, U.S.-China trade, and social and internet policies. Mr. Ma writes regularly for the Atlantic Monthly online and publishes widely, including in Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, and Foreign Policy, as well as appearing in a range of broadcast media. He is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

Webcast Registration
Click here to register for the webcast.

Videoconference Registration
The videoconference registration has reached capacity. For or information, please contact Emily Markham at 412-281-7027 or email emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Questions?
Contact Emily Markham at 412-281-7027 or email emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Global Trends_pittsburgh
2013-2014 International Youth Forum
The World of Tomorrow: Global Trends and You

Video Conference Series for High School Students

October 30, 2013

October 2013 – March 2014

Over the course of the 2013-2014 school year, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh will hold a series of International Youth Forums focused on the global trends that will affect the lives of today’s students. The series will start with an overview of global trends and transnational threats on Wednesday, October 30 from 8:00-10:00 AM featuring Mr. Tom Sanderson, Co-Director of the Transnational Threats Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. This session will be followed by a discussion of demographic trends. The final session on Wednesday, March 5 will focus on global competitiveness and collaboration. Students will select the themes that will be explored at the sessions in December, January, and February. Topics may include: food, water and nutrition; resource scarcity; the role of cities in the 21st century; the future of energy; globalization and the shift in power; transnational threats and non-state actors; as well as technology and innovation.

Each session will be a 90-minute video conference with small groups of students participating from local and international sites. After the first session, two cohorts will run in parallel for the year, with a final event in March. Registered schools will commit to participating throughout the year. Please see the tentative schedule for details.

All registered schools will receive an educational toolkit with resources, preparatory materials, and discussion questions.

Prior to each International Youth Forum, students will complete preparation work, which will include viewing and reading various media in preparation for discussion. They will also conduct research on the topics to be discussed and prepare brief presentations on selected topics. Each session will be led by an expert facilitator.

Each of the Youth Forums will explore a significant global trend. In addition to an overview on global trends and demographics, other topics may include: food, water and nutrition; resource scarcity; the role of cities in the 21st century; the future of energy; globalization and the shift in power; transnational threats and non-state actors; as well as technology and innovation. Students will discuss the topics with their peers at sites around the world and have the opportunity to develop potential solutions to today’s and tomorrow’s challenges at home and around the world. They have the option of taking action on the topics if they so choose.

The culminating event will bring together all of the students from some 20 schools throughout the region and around the world to discuss their perspectives on the topics.

Tentative Schedule
Each participating school will join a cohort (either A or B).
Sessions will be offered in early or mid- morning (Eastern Time Zone).

 

Introductory Event: Global Trends and Transnational Threats

featuring Mr. Tom Sanderson

Co-Director and Senior Fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies Transnational Threats Project

Thomas Sanderson is Co-Director and Senior Fellow in the CSIS Transnational Threats Project, where he works on terrorism, transnational crime, global trends, Central Asia, and intelligence issues. With fieldwork in nearly 60 countries, Mr. Sanderson engages all manner of sources including extremists, insurgents, foreign intelligence officials, nongovernmental organizations, clergy, and academics. He has authored or coauthored 13 major CSIS reports, as well as opinion pieces and articles in the New York Times, Economist, Washington Post, West Point CTC Sentinel, and Harvard Asia-Pacific Review.

Mr. Sanderson recently co-directed an al-Qaeda futures study, a Central Asia Islamic revival study, and currently codirects an investigation of emerging trends in militancy across South Asia. From 2004 to 2009, he led the CSIS open source counterterrorism project, designing and moderating two major studies on threats in Europe and Southeast Asia. He also codirected a project on the geopolitical implications of the U.S. Northern Distribution Network (military supply lines to Afghanistan) and another on Central Asian terrorists operating between the Ferghana Valley and South Waziristan. Mr. Sanderson serves as a course instructor and consultant for the U.S. government and the private sector on terrorism, China, and global threats. He provides expert commentary for the media and courts of law. With Science Applications International Corporation (1998–2002), he researched terrorism for the Defense Intelligence Agency, and in the winter of 2005, he completed a fellowship at the American Academy in Berlin. In 2001, he held a fellowship at Fudan University in Shanghai, China. Sanderson received a B.A. from Wheaton College in Massachusetts and an M.A. from the Fletcher School at Tufts University.

Limited space is available!

International Youth Forum Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register. 

Questions?
Please call Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or email amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Thanks to our partners: AIU3 and MAGPI

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Does Syria Matter?

Michael Doran
Roger Hertog Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Saban Center for Middle East Policy
Brookings Institution

November 1, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Since the Syrian Civil War began over two and a half years ago, over 100,000 have died, and over 2 million refugees have fled the worn-torn country. Syria is part of a long list of revolutions and political upheavals that have come to characterize the oft-cited but constantly evolving Arab Spring. Yet the situation in Syria is entirely unique — as are all countries involved in the dramatic change sweeping the Middle East and North Africa.

The recent chemical weapons attack that claimed the lives of 1,300 Syrians in a suburb of Damascus has further complicated what is already a geopolitical quagmire. Political dissent, general war fatigue, and an international coalition split on what course to take makes any involvement in Syria — either diplomatic or military — wrought with untold consequences and ramifications. Some claim that inaction shows the collective weakness of declining Western powers and their respective influence, while others demand U.S. intervention in order to assure the integrity of international agreements and American hegemony. Add to the equation the presence of loosely-confederated foreign fighters, militant groups, and al-Qaeda affiliated organizations such as the al-Nusra Front, and action in Syria seems to chart only bad, worse, or terrible outcomes.

But does Syria actually matter? In all of its complexities, why is the Syrian Civil War an increasingly American issue? Join the World Affairs Council and a leading expert on the ongoing Syrian conflict for an exploration of the inherent challenges and nuance that run through one of the most divisive and pressing issues in modern geopolitics.

Michael Doran is a Senior Fellow at the Saban Center for Middle East Politics at the Brookings Institution. Previously, he was a Visiting Professor at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School for Public Service. In April 2007, he was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Diplomacy at the Department of Defense after being the Senior Director for Near East and North African Affairs at the National Security Council from 2005 to 2007. His teaching career began at the University of Central Florida and later joined the Near East Studies Department at Princeton University. He has served as Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and is a scholar with the Middle East Strategy at Harvard project of the National Security Studies Program at Harvard University. He frequently comments in the media, including CNN, Foreign Policy, and elsewhere.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 28, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 

Bruce Katz Vice President and Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution Co-Author of The Metropolitan Revolution
Breakfast Briefing
Rethinking Power in America: Why Cities and Metros are Our Centers of Global Trade and Investment

Bruce Katz
Vice President and Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution
Co-Author, The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy

October 16, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

A revolution is stirring in America. In the face of federal gridlock, economic stagnation, and fiscal turmoil, power in the United States is shifting away from Washington, and even state capitols, toward major cities and metropolitan areas. Across the nation, these communities — and the networks of pragmatic leaders who govern them — are taking on the big issues that Washington will not, or cannot, solve. They are reshaping our economy, and fixing our broken political system — which will affect America’s place in the world.

Coined the “Metropolitan Revolution” by Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley of the Brookings Institution, the centralization of power, influence, and autonomy within major U.S. cities is a national movement — gaining momentum on both coasts, and developing from the Midwest to the Gulf region.  The revolution is being led by a pragmatic caucus who put place over party, collaboration over conflict, and evidence over dogma. This group—mayors, university presidents, CEOs of major firms, and heads of business associations, labor unions, civic organizations and philanthropies — is restructuring the national economy.

Join the World Affairs Council to learn more about how the Metropolitan Revolution defines the way to break through our paralyzed politics, reshape our federal republic, and revive our economy.

Bruce Katz is a Vice President at the Brookings Institution and founding Director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, which provides decision-makers across sectors with policy ideas for improving the health and prosperity of cities and metropolitans areas. Currently, Mr. Katz leads two signature initiatives at Brookings: the Brookings-Rockefeller Project on State and Metropolitan Innovation and the Global Cities Initiative.

He regularly advises federal, state, regional, and municipal leaders on policy reforms that advance the competitiveness of metropolitan areas in topics critical to the next economy, including fostering innovation, taking advantage of the clean economy, growing exports, and creating broad-based opportunity. He counsels on shifting demographic and market trends as well as on policies that are critical to metropolitan prosperity and new forms of governance.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25
Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 11, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Border Crossings  International Careers at Home and Abroad
Border Crossings
International Careers at Home and Abroad

October 24, 2013

9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EDT

Pittsburgh Allderdice High School, 2409 Shady Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217

A seminar for high school students, offered in partnership
with Pittsburgh Allderdice High School

What does it take to be successful in a global environment? Learn from professionals representing the public, private, and non-profit sectors as they talk about how cultural competence and world language skills have shaped their professional lives. Featuring a panel discussion and breakout sessions, this seminar will provide students the opportunity to explore a diverse array of international and domestic careers.  

World language, social studies, science and gifted students alike will benefit from this event.

Schedule
8:30 am: Registration
9:00 - 10:00 am: Panel Discussion and Q&A
10:15 am - 12:30 pm: Breakout Presentations

There is no charge for this seminar. Confirmation details will be sent upon registration. Please register online by October 4, 2013.

Morning snacks will be provided.

This program has reached capacity. If you have any questions, please contact Elizabeth Cook at elizabeth@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-224-4339.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Gen. Michael V. Hayden Former Director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency Principle, Chertoff Group
John T. Ryan Memorial Lecture

Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon

Security, Privacy, Surveillance...and You

Gen. Michael V. Hayden
Former Director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency
Principal, Chertoff Group

November 18, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

The cyber-domain has permeated virtually all aspects of society — leaving many to debate the boundaries of the virtual world and the ramifications of a rapidly-expanding digital era. Perhaps the latest and most notable example is the controversy around NSA contractor-turned-exile Edward Snowden’s leaking of details related to U.S. government-led programs such as PRISM, XKeyscore, and Tempora. The subsequent fall-out has dominated headlines and discussions the world-over.

While Mr. Snowden’s actions have spurred international debate over the intentions and legality of such programs, the dynamics of the controversy underscore much larger questions. How are we adapting to an increasingly digitalized world? Does personal security truly exist in the 21st century? Should we brace for a paradigm shift in the way civil society interacts with its respective governments?

Join the World Affairs Council and one of the most highly-decorated intelligence officials in U.S. history for an exploration of the digital frontier, the laws and legislation thereof, and the role government plays in it.

Gen. Michael V. Hayden is the former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency. He is currently a Principal at the Chertoff Group and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at George Mason University. As Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2006-2009, Gen. Hayden oversaw the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America's adversaries, producing timely analysis for decision makers, and conducting covert operations to thwart terrorists and other enemies of the U.S. Before becoming Director of the CIA, Gen. Hayden served as the country's first Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence and was the highest-ranking intelligence officer in the armed forces. He also served as Commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center, Director of the National Security Agency and Chief of the Central Security Service. Gen. Hayden has appeared in the media on such shows as Charlie Rose, Meet the Press, This Week, Nightline, and CNN's Nightly News. A Pittsburgh native, he holds degrees from Duquesne University and did postgraduate work at the Defense Intelligence School.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 15, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Media Sponsor

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dr. Eckart Woertz Senior Researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs  Author of Oil for Food: The Global Food Crisis and the Middle East
Global Food Security: Politics and Agriculture in the Middle East
Videoconference

Dr. Eckart Woertz
Senior Research Fellow
Barcelona Centre for International Affairs

October 4, 2013

10:45 – 11:45 a.m. EDT

Hosted by Pittsburgh Science and Technology Academy

What is the intersection of the environment, agriculture, and politics?

How are countries in the Middle East addressing their lack of self-sufficiency in food production?

What can the rest of the world learn from these struggles?

Water, fertilizer, and oil are essential assets in food production, yet many countries around the world — and in the Middle East in particular — are lacking at least one of these assets. According to the World Bank, Gulf countries import 100% of their staple foods. Did hunger spark the current civil war in Syria? How vulnerable are other countries in the region? How are governments addressing these challenges?

Eckart Woertz is a Senior Research Fellow at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs. He is a specialist on political and economic issues in the Middle East, particularly in the strategically important Persian Gulf region. Previously, he was a visiting fellow at Princeton University and before that Director of Economic Studies of the Gulf Research Center in Dubai. He also worked for banks in Germany and the United Arab Emirates. He has consulted international and regional organizations such as the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and the Saudi Ministry of Economy and Planning. As contributor and commentator to international and regional media outlets like the Financial Times, The National, and Al Arabiya, he has charted the rapid economic development on the Arabian Peninsula. He has dealt extensively with economic diversification in the Gulf region, sovereign wealth funds, food security, energy issues, and the impact of the global financial crisis on the Gulf countries. He is author of Oil for Food: The Global Food Crisis and the Middle East and numerous articles. He holds an MA in Middle Eastern Studies and a PhD in Economics from Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg.

Videoconference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register. 

Questions?
Please call Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or email amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dr. Eckart Woertz Senior Researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs  Author of Oil for Food: The Global Food Crisis and the Middle East
Breakfast Briefing
The Real Cost of Bread: The Global Food Crisis, Land Grabs, and the Future of the Middle East

Dr. Eckart Woertz
Senior Researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs
Author of Oil for Food: The Global Food Crisis and the Middle East

October 4, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Rising food prices particularly affect the poor and economically dispossessed. Some estimates indicate that 44 million people in the Middle East may have been driven to poverty by the rising cost of food. Subsequently, a lack of available nutritional food is a compounding problem, specifically affecting Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Gaza, and the West Bank. Last year in Syria, the cost for a sack of flour increased nearly 700 percent.

According to the World Bank, “high and volatile” food prices have become the “new normal” since the global food crisis in 2008. To help alleviate this stress, many countries — particularly in the Middle East — have now gone on to invest billions in what some analysts call “land grabs” — acquiring large swaths of territory in order to develop agriculture.

What does this all mean for a region dealing with dramatic political change and socioeconomic unrest? How will the geopolitical system deal with a growing global food crisis? Join the World Affairs Council and the American Council on Germany for a discussion with a leading expert in food security examining the ramifications and consequences of one of the Middle East’s most pressing challenges.

Dr. Eckart Woertz is a Senior Researcher at the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs and a specialist of political and economic issues in the Middle East. He deals extensively with the Gulf economy, sovereign wealth funds, food security, energy issues, and the impact of the global financial crisis on Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Formerly, he was a visiting fellow at Princeton University, Director of Economic Studies at the Gulf Research Center in Dubai, and worked for banks in Germany and the United Arab Emirates.

As a contributor and commentator to international and regional media outlets like the Financial Times, The National, and Al Arabiya, Dr. Woertz has charted the rapid economic development on the Arabian Peninsula. He holds an M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies and a Ph.D. in Economics from Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen-Nuremberg.  

Registration
ACG and World Affairs Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25
Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 30, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With thanks to

 

Amb. Felipe Bulnes Ambassador of Chile to the United States
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Chile: A South American Success Story

Amb. Felipe Bulnes
Ambassador of Chile to the United States

November 4, 2013

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

September 11, 2013 marked the fortieth anniversary of the military coup that put General Augusto Pinochet in power. Controversially and clandestinely supported by the U.S. government, the coup that led the Pinochet’s rise still remains a heated topic of debate for many Chileans. To some, tens of thousands of internments, tortures, and deaths of political opponents and dissenters marked a legacy of brutality under Pinochet the dictator. Others cite a reformed economy that led to the “Miracle of Chile” under Pinochet the president.

Despite this controversy and its history, Chile is on the move. Voices of sociopolitical reconciliation have emerged from this country of some 17 million people. While much work remains, collaboration and progress are replacing political dissent, injustice, and mistrust. Moreover, Chile’s economy is on the upswing, growing at a 5.6 percent rate in 2012, according to World Bank data. Strong trade with China, robust natural resource supplies, and sustainable agriculture have contributed to a resilient market. Instead of a country in crisis, many South America watchers are now witnessing the rise of a Pacific and regional power.

What does the future hold for Chile? How will its story of success play out? Join the World Affairs Council and Chile’s chief diplomat in the United States for a discussion about Chile’s ascendency and the importance of resiliency in a rapidly changing geopolitical system.

Felipe Bulnes is the Ambassador of Chile to the United States. He has held numerous political positions in Chile. Among them, he was elected for three successive periods as member of the Political Commission of the Renovación Nacional Party from 2001 to 2010. He also served as Director of the Law and Justice Chapter of the Grupos Tantaucos organization, where he was in charge of preparing the presidential program of then candidate Sebastián Piñera. Amb. Bulnes was both Minister of Justice from March 2010 to July 2011 and Minister of Education from July 2011 to December 2011. In addition to his diplomatic service, Amb. Bulnes has a prestigious academic career that includes positions as Professor of Civil Law as well as Professor of Law and Economics at the Catholic University of Chile and the Adolfo Ibáñez University. He graduated with a law degree from the Catholic University of Chile and earned his LL.M from Harvard Law School.

Registration
World Affairs Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 30, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In partnership with:

 

Sponsored by:

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Global Dignity Day
Global Dignity Day
Live Webcast and Interactive Videoconference

Charlie Batch
Former Pittsburgh Steelers Football Player
Founder of the Best of the Batch Foundation

October 16, 2013

9:30-10:30 a.m. EDT

Presentation, Webcast, and Videoconference (Grades 4-6)

Dignity and respect have an impact on us all during our lifetime. Global Dignity Day is an international effort to connect students across the globe to discuss the role that dignity and respect plays in their lives. Over the course of the morning, students will participate in activities and conversation with their local and international peers to highlight ways students can promote dignity and respect in their classrooms and community.

Special guest Charlie Batch, in his role as National Spokesperson for UPMC’s Dignity & Respect Campaign for Youth, will introduce the students to the importance of dignity and respect based on his personal journey and experiences. Using videoconferencing technology, schools will be encouraged to present what dignity and respect means to them by using the designated “30 Tips of Dignity and Respect.” Participants will also be given the opportunity to converse more candidly with Mr. Batch through a round of questions, answers, and discussion.

Charlie Batch is a former Pittsburgh Steelers’ quarterback, and founder of the Best of the Batch Foundation. He is an active member of the Pittsburgh community and has implemented successful programs supporting sports, education and the community as a whole. Mr. Batch serves on numerous boards including the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society, the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Strong Women Strong Girls, and the Youth Futures Commission. He is also the recipient of a range of awards for both his athletic and philanthropic achievement, including the 2013 Bryon “Whizzer” White Award. Mr. Batch earned a B.A. in Criminal Justice from Eastern Michigan University. He has also completed programs at the Wharton Business School, Harvard Business School and the Kellogg School of Management.

Live Webcast Registration
Click here to register for the webcast.

Interactive Videoconference Registration
The Interactive Videoconference has reached capacity.

Questions?
Contact Emily Markham at emily@worldpittsburgh.org, or 412-281-7027.

To learn more about the Dignity and Respect campaign visit www.dignityandrespect.org.

In partnership with

                        

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dr. Scott Kofmehl
KQV Global Press Conference
New Perspectives on the U.S.-Vietnam Relationship

July 20, 2013

10:30 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Scott Kofmehl, Senior Vietnam Desk Officer, U.S. Department of State. He will discuss "New Perspectives on the U.S.-Vietnam Relationship” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 48,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

43rd World Affairs Institute for Student Leaders
Turkey: A Bridge or an Island?

November 7, 2013

9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Senator John Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

What is the objective of the Institute?
The Institute engages high school student leaders in a discussion of key issues in international affairs so that they can understand and think critically about their world.

Who can attend the Institute?
High school students are selected by local Rotary Clubs (Districts 6650, 7280, 7300, and 7330) in cooperation with schools. Each Rotary Club determines the number of scholarships available.

How many student delegates will attend?
Approximately 350 high school juniors and seniors.

How is the conference structured?
Through panel presentations and small breakout sessions, experts will discuss key issues with the student delegates. Each student will receive a comprehensive background paper prior to the Institute.

Who pays for the scholarships?
Each Rotary Club pays for the number of scholarships it is sponsoring.  The fee of $75 for each delegate will cover the cost of registration, educational materials, all conference sessions, lunch, and refreshments.

Tentative Institute Schedule

  9:00 a.m.     Registration
  9:30 a.m.     Welcome and Introduction
  9:45 a.m.     Keynote Speaker or Panel w/ Q&A
11:30 a.m.    
Panel Discussion
12:30 p.m.     Institute Luncheon
  1:50 p.m.     Discussion Group Session
  3:00 p.m.     Discussion Group De-Briefing
 
3:30p.m.      Adjournment

How to Register
Student Registration
Please use this link to complete the online registration form to confirm your acceptance of the scholarship. 

Chaperone Registration
Chaperones please use this link for registration.

Historically, the Republic of Turkey has been seen as a bridge between East and West. Not only do cultures from Europe and Asia meet and comingle in Turkey, but the Bosphorus Bridge, one of two spanning the Bosphorus Straight, literally connects the two continents.  A member of NATO, home of Pittsburgh’s newest sister city, and democratic partner of the United States, Turkey has long been an important ally in U.S. foreign policy in the region.

Until recently, the country appeared to be an island of stability surrounded by a sea of chaos, with economic crisis in Europe and political upheaval in the Middle East. However, this past spring, Turkey was embroiled in its own turmoil as anti-government protests erupted in Istanbul and across the country.

Factoring in a civil war on the country’s doorstep, a growing – and increasingly dissatisfied – middle class, and an ongoing struggle between secularism and moderate Islam within the government, experts must ask: Is this essential ally a bridge in danger of collapse?

The 2013 World Affairs Institute will focus on answering this and other questions by exploring the domestic and foreign challenges facing Turkey today, including U.S.-Turkish relations, and the important role the country plays within the world’s most turbulent region.

As the situation within Turkey continues to unfold, and the foreign policy relations with its neighbors further develop, the World Affairs Council will provide participants with up-to-date online resources as well as a comprehensive background paper on the topic. Online resources can be found by visiting  www.WAIpittsburgh.wordpress.com.

2013 World Institute Paper
You can read this year's background paper on Turkey, click here.

Thoughts on the Topic

“European member states and Turkey are allies, also militarily, in promoting peace and security. The ties between the people in our societies are old and deep.”

-Herman Van Rompuy
President, European Council

“Turkey is Muslim, prosperous, and democratic. There isn’t another country like that.”

-Francis Ricciardone
U.S. Ambassador to Turkey

“Turkey is crucial for the [Syrian] rebels. It offers refuge for their families as well as a safe zone where they can plan and launch attacks over the border.”

-Sophia Jones
Journalist, Foreign Policy

“After years of trying to go it alone in the Middle East, Turkey’s leaders and public must face the fact that their country needs the United States and NATO for security and stability.”

-Soner Cagaptay
Beyer Family Fellow and Director of the Turkish Research Program, Washington Institute for Near East Policy

Thoughts on the Institute

“The Council did an exceptional job (as always) of choosing unique scenarios that truly show how every little piece of the puzzle is significant.”

“This Institute was a very eye-opening experience. It allowed me to understand the scope of the situation at hand and inspired me to become an even more globally-aware citizen and to be even more aware of the issues in our world.”

“The background materials allowed me to comprehend the complex issues the speakers presented and I left that afternoon feeling like I had a greater understanding of the topic.”

This year’s World Affairs Institute marks the 43rd year of collaboration between the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Rotary International.

About Rotary International
Rotary is a worldwide organization of more than 1.2 million business, professional, and community leaders. The mission of Rotary International is to provide service to others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders. There are 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Clubs are non-partisan, non-denominational, and open to all cultures, races, and creeds. As signified by the motto, “Service Above Self,” Rotary’s main objective is service - in the community, in the workplace, and throughout the world.

About the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting a deeper understanding of key contemporary international issues throughout Western Pennsylvania. Established in 1931, the Council has a special focus on secondary schools throughout the region, and works to give students and teachers a more nuanced understanding of the global issues of our time. The Council also is committed to informing opinion leaders and decision-makers about developments around the world as they unfold - and to educating them about the relevance of such developments to the region. 

Questions?
Contact Emily Markham at the Council by phone at 412. 281.7027 or by email at emily@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

 Mark J. Davidson Minister-Counselor for Public Affairs, United States Embassy, Tokyo, Japan U.S. Department of State
Breakfast Briefing
Making “Smart Power” Work for America — In Japan and Around the World

Mark J. Davidson
Minister-Counselor for Public Affairs, United States Embassy, Tokyo, Japan
U.S. Department of State

August 27, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Some analysts and pundits believe the sun is setting on the days of American global hegemony.  With the rise of other powers, the international community is confronted with a variety of geopolitical actors. While many countries adapt to this change, so too has the United States. “Smart power,” and particularly the fundamentals of strong public diplomacy, are now more important than ever in sustaining American influence. Perhaps no where is the use of “smart power” more important than in the Asia-Pacific.

Totaling nearly one-third of the world’s entire population, Asia-Pacific countries continue to make their mark on the geopolitical landscape. Rising economic prowess, demographic shifts, and increasing interconnectedness make the Asia-Pacific a lightning rod of socioeconomic and political activity. Partnerships are at a premium, and perhaps no other country has been as instrumental in fostering U.S. Asia-Pacific influence than Japan. Whether it is “Abenomics,” the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Obama Administration’s “Asia Pivot,” or myriad other developments, Japan plays an integral role in virtually all trends relating to the region.

Join the World Affairs Council and one of the U.S. State Department’s most senior diplomats for an off-the-record discussion about 21st century statecraft.

Mark J. Davidson has served as U.S. Embassy Tokyo’s Minister-Counselor for Public Affairs since March 2012. A career Senior Foreign Service officer, he leads the U.S. government’s largest array of media, information, cultural, and educational programs in the East Asia-Pacific region. His previous diplomatic tours in Japan include Cultural Affairs Officer in Tokyo, Public Affairs Officer at Consulate General Sapporo, and Deputy Director of the Tokyo American Center. From 2008-2010, he was Director of Global Policy Planning and Resources for Public Diplomacy and then Director of the Global Strategic Engagement Center at the U.S. State Department. His other postings include Pakistan, Paraguay, Venezuela, and Spain. He speaks Japanese, Spanish, and French. He has received the U.S. State Department’s Superior Honor Award and Commendation for Exceptional Service, among other professional honors .

Registration
World Affairs Council and JASP Members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after August 22, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With support from the Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breakfast Briefing: China is Number One: So What
Breakfast Briefing
China as Number One: So What?

William Adams
Senior International Economist
PNC Financial Services Group

Damien Ma
Fellow
Paulson Institute

October 11, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Many experts believe that within the decade, China will have the world’s largest economy — a position the U.S. has held for over a century. As these two superpowers jockey for geopolitical position and influence, what does this trajectory mean for the rest of the world? There is much room for speculation and conjecture, leading at least two veteran China-watchers to say, “So what?” Join the Council and co-authors of In Line Behind A Billion People: How Scarcity Will Define China’s Ascent in the Next Decade to discuss the ramifications of a growing Chinese economy and uncover the fact and fiction behind one of the most intensely-discussed issues facing the international community.

William Adams is Assistant Vice President and Senior International Economist for the PNC Financial Services Group. His responsibilities include forecasting economic conditions and exchange rates, covering emerging Asia, the European Union, Canada and Latin America. Mr. Adams serves as the principal spokesperson on global economic issues for PNC, and frequently presents to PNC clients on the international economic outlook. He joined PNC in July 2011 after serving as resident economist for The Conference Board China Center from 2009 to 2011. Mr. Adams lived in China for five of the past ten years and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese. He holds a master degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and is a graduate of Harvard College.

Damien Ma is a Fellow at The Paulson Institute, focused on investment and policy programs and the Institute's research and think tank activities. Previously, he was a Lead China Analyst at Eurasia Group, a political risk research and advisory firm. He specialized in analyzing the intersection between Chinese policies and markets, with a particular focus on energy and commodities, industrial policy, U.S.-China trade, and social and internet policies. Mr. Ma writes regularly for the Atlantic Monthly online and publishes widely, including in Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, and Foreign Policy, as well as appearing in a range of broadcast media, such as the Charlie Rose Show, Bloomberg, and the PBS NewsHour. He is fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

Registration
World Affairs Council members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 7, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Anil Parajuli Co-founder of Himalayan HealthCare, Vice President and Director of Nepali Programs
Breakfast Briefing
From Civil War to Democracy: The Challenging Terrain of Daily Life in Nepal

Anil Parajuli
Co-Founder, Vice President, and Nepal Program Coordinator
Himalayan HealthCare

September 24, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

It has been seven years since Nepal emerged from the throes of a decade-long civil war that left nearly 20,000 people dead and over 100,000 displaced. Since 2006, negotiated peace accords reduced wide-scale violence. However, political instability and extreme poverty continue to plague the mountainous country of some 30 million people. As Nepal works toward building a permanent constitution and a sustainable political system, many Nepalese struggle daily with hardships that come after years of conflict and sociopolitical change. One quarter of Nepalese live below the poverty line — with some unemployment figures reaching as high as 46 percent. With an economy largely dependent of agriculture, diversification is limited. Regular and effective access to health care, safe drinking water, and regular amenities remain considerable obstacles.

How is Nepal dealing with such steep challenges? Is there optimism for the future? Join the Council and one of Nepal’s leading humanitarians as we focus our lens on the daily lives of Nepal’s resilient people, and what course Nepal is set to take as it recovers from a brutal conflict.

Anil Parajuli is the Co-founder, Vice President, and Coordinator of Himalayan HealthCare (HHC), a nonprofit established to create sustainable development programs in the remote areas of Nepal that has improved the quality of life for its people. He has over twenty years of experience working in villages on projects in health care, community education, and income generation. In accordance with the goals of HHC, Mr. Parajuli was instrumental in establishing the Dr. Megh Bahadur Parajuli Community Hospital in eastern Nepal, a hospital that continues to serve several hundred thousand people on an ongoing basis. He also organized and led countless medical and dental treks though the mountainous regions of Nepal. In 2001, Mr. Parajuli was named an Ashoka Fellow in recognition for his work with HHC. Mr. Parajuli was also named Social Entrepreneur of the Year for 2003-2004 at the Boss Business Excellence Awards and one of the Top 50 Personalities in Nepal from 2004 to 2007.

Registration
Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 20, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With support from the Brother’s Brother Foundation

 

KQV Hans Martens, former Chief Executive, European Policy Centre
KQV Global Press Conference
The Power of Europe: Ukraine, TTIP, and European Leadership on the Global Stage

May 11, 2013

10:30 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Hans Martens, former Chief Executive, European Policy Centre. He will discuss "The Power of Europe: Ukraine, TTIP, and European Leadership on the Global Stage” with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 48,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

The Politics of Jesus
Discussion and Reception
The Politics of Jesus

Dr. Reza Aslan
Author of Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth and No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam
Associate Professor of Creative Writing at the University of California - Riverside

September 17, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Dr. Reza Aslan is an internationally acclaimed writer and scholar of religions. His most recent book, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, arrived in bookstores in July, and has been garnering significant media attention.

His first book is the international bestseller, No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, which has been translated into thirteen languages, and named one of the 100 most important books of the last decade. He is also the author of How to Win a Cosmic War (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism: Confronting Religious Extremism in a Globalized Age), as well as editor of two volumes: Tablet and Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, and Muslims and Jews in America: Commonalties, Contentions, and Complexities.

Dr. Aslan is the founder of AslanMedia.com, an online journal for news and entertainment about the Middle East and the world, and co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of BoomGen Studios, the premier entertainment brand for creative content from and about the Greater Middle East.

Born in Iran, Dr. Aslan holds degrees from Santa Clara University, Harvard University, and the University of California, Santa Barbara, as well the University of Iowa. An Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, he is also a member of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities and the Pacific Council on International Policy. He serves on the board of directors of the Ploughshares Fund, Narrative Four, PEN USA, and the Levantine Cultural Center.

Registration
Student Admission (with ID): $15 | General Admission: $25  | VIP: $50
(VIPs receive a signed copy of Zealot, priority seating, and a special opportunity to meet the author)

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 13, 2013 will be charged.

Cash Bar. Appetizers will be served.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

Co-sponsored by the Humanities Scholars Program  at Carnegie Mellon University
Media sponsor: 90.5 WESA

 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

WorldQuest 2013
WorldQuest
International Trivia Competition
10th Anniversary

Hosted by:
WTAE’s Sally Wiggin and
Essential Pittsburgh 90.5 WESA’s Paul Guggenheimer

October 21, 2013

5:45 p.m.: Check in
6:30 p.m.: Let the games begin!

Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Join us for a fun evening of food, drinks, prizes, unique networking opportunities, and friendly competition. Show off your knowledge of the world and help support the work of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Once again, WorldQuest will be held at the Cabaret Theater in Pittsburgh’s Cultural District. This annual event provides an informal opportunity for people throughout the Pittsburgh community to test their knowledge about international affairs. Small teams of four will compete for prizes. In addition, players and observers in the "cheering section" will have an opportunity to enter a raffle to win exciting prizes! All proceeds for this event go to support the Council’s more than 200 annual events reaching the region’s secondary schools and professional community.

Q. Fourteen newly-born panda cubs are currently at a research base in what Chinese city famous for its breeding centers and nature reserves specifically designed for the endangered giant panda species?

  1. Chengdu
  2. Wuhan
  3. Guangzhou
  4. Shenzhen

Click here to play!

Raffles and Prizes!
Stay tuned for prize and raffle lists!

Start Studying Now!
Use this link for the 2012 WorldQuest questions and answers.

Not interested in competing? Why don’t you come and cheer on the competitors? Just like last year, you can watch WorldQuest from the “Cheering Section” and support a team of your choice.

  • Team of 4: $120
  • Single Competitor: $30 (Those registered as single competitors will be placed in teams of 4 on the day of the competition).
  • Cheering Section: $30

Dinner included in the ticket price. Cash bar.

When registering a team, please include the team name, identify the team captain, and include the names of the other team members. Pre-payment is required for all players and teams.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

WorldQuest 2013 Sponsorship and Donor Opportunities

We are looking for sponsors who will also field one or more teams. This year's sponsorship opportunities include:

Bronze: $500

  • One team of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage

Silver: $1,000

  • Two teams of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 2 to the “Cheering Section.”

Gold: $2,500

  • Two teams of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 4 to the “Cheering Section.”
  • Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.
  • One Corporate Level membership to the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Please contact Dan Law, at 412-281-1259, or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org for more information.

With thanks to:

Event Sponsor


Silver Sponsor


Bronze Sponsor



Media Sponsors

Prize Donors

      

                                                                                                                                                         

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador Carlos Pascual Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs U.S. Department of State
Breakfast Briefing
Energy in a Global Context: Challenges and Opportunities

Ambassador Carlos Pascual
Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs
U.S. Department of State

July 18, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

It seems that U.S. energy independence is not a matter of “if,” but “when.” Oil production in the U.S. is increasing, and natural gas continues to be a boom industry across the country. Trends certainly indicate that the U.S. enjoys a significant comparative advantage in the “energy mix.” In an increasingly interconnected global community, economic interdependence — particularly within the realm of the energy trade — demands new and innovative approaches to policy and diplomacy. Much lies upon this balance, including national security, sustainable economy, and civil society. As an emerging global energy center, Pittsburgh finds itself at the nexus of this discourse.

While the U.S. certainly has many resources at its disposal, other countries have substantial energy reserves as well. However, access remains a particular challenge, affecting both the developed and developing world. Obstacles such as water shortages and limited technology constrain many societies from reaching their full potential. Sustainable energy is at many fingertips, but currently resides just out of reach. In a rapidly changing geopolitical system, it remains in the self-interest of the U.S. to continue to be engaged. While energy independence displays obvious benefits, Americans must approach the global community anew, and not draw back.

Join the World Affairs Council and Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for International Policy and Innovation for a conversation with a distinguished U.S. public servant about the impact of energy on an evolving global community.

Ambassador Carlos Pascual is the U.S. State Department’s Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs. He was appointed to this position by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on May 18, 2011. In this capacity, he advises the Secretary on energy issues, ensuring that energy security is advanced at all levels of U.S. foreign policy. Prior to his appointment, Amb. Pascual served as the United States Ambassador to Mexico from 2009 to 2011, and was Vice President and Director of the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution from 2003 to 2009. During his extensive career in public service, Amb. Pascual has held positions in the Department of State, the National Security Council (NSC) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). He received his M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1982 and his B.A. from Stanford University in 1980. 

Registration
There is no charge for World Affairs Council members and CMU guests | Others: $15

Participants must register to attend.Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after July 12, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.


In partnership with the Center for International Policy and Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ross Harrison Professor, Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University Author of Strategic Thinking in 3-D: A Guide for National Security, Foreign Policy, and Business Professionals
Political Salon
Demystifying Strategy: Is Strategy Possible in a Democracy?

Ross Harrison
Professor, Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University
Author of Strategic Thinking in 3-D: A Guide for National Security, Foreign Policy, and Business Professionals

July 24, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bar Marco, 2216 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In a competitive international marketplace and an increasingly interconnected global environment, leadership and adept implementation of strategy are fundamental to success. Both leadership and strategy span across all sectors — up to an including national security, policy, business, and NGOs. In many ways, the relatively thin line between correct and incorrect strategy and effective and ineffective leadership can lead to success or substantial losses.

In his book, Strategic Thinking in 3-D, Ross Harrison focuses on three particular types of strategy: systems, opponents, and groups. Ranging from analyzing a competitor’s capability and motivation, to mobilizing consumer and market groups, leaders’ strategic thinking can help their respective organization’s leverage comparative advantages and gain a leg up on the competition. It is perhaps easy to say leadership and strategy are vital in all sectors, but how does one begin to implement them in such a dynamic and multinational marketplace?

The last decade has introduced changes to geopolitical dynamics and the global balance of power. Ten years defined by both ailing and surging economies, political discord, revolution, conflict, and technological advancement leave many wondering how to lead given the rapidly shifting world order. How does one plan for change of this velocity?

Join the World Affairs Council and Leadership Pittsburgh, Inc. in a search for answers, as we partner to host a discussion about leadership, effective strategy, and how strategic thinking will help us all prepare to handle a changing world.

Recent Articles by Ross Harrison:

"Whither the Muslim Brothers?" Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 18, 2013

"Is a Strategy for Syria Possible?" The Huffington Post, July 1, 2013

"The Presidential Election in Iran Matters," The Huffington Post, June 24, 2013

Ross Harrison is Professor in the Practice of International Affairs and Chair of the International Commerce and Business concentration in the Foreign Service program in the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. His research interests center around the pedagogy of strategy, a topic he has written on in collaboration with a group of colleagues from the U.S. Army War College and the National Defense University. On the international business front, Mr. Harrison has led many private companies, serving as President and CEO of Builders Edge, as well as Executive Vice President of Tapco International. From 2005 to 2009, Mr. Harrison also served as Vice-President of the America-Georgia Business Council in Washington, D.C., an international NGO which promotes and facilitates business ties between the United States and the Republic of Georgia. 

Registration
Free for World Affairs Council and Leadership Pittsburgh, Inc. Alumni | Others: $10

Cash bar. Drink Specials! Appetizers will be served.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after July 19, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In partnership with Leadership Pittsburgh, Inc.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Hans-Ulrich Klose Chairman of the German-American Parliamentary Group Member of the German Bundestag  Pivot to Reality: New Strategies for the West?
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Pivot to Reality: New Strategies for the West?

Hans-Ulrich Klose
Chairman of the German-American Parliamentary Group
Member of the German Bundestag

September 6, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Much has been made of the substantial geopolitical shifts occurring around the world. In recent decades, focus has been on the relative decline of the west and the rise of the BRICS and other emerging economies. Economics and geopolitics continue to define a “new world order.”

Western power projection no longer remains unchallenged. Within the U.N. Security Council, western interests have not been able to curb the influence of the quasi Russo-Sino partnership. Intervention in Syria — in its various forms — has been rejected by a Chinese-Russian impasse, curtailing any U.N. action within the war-torn country. As China’s economy continues to grow, solutions to the EU’s financial woes continue to elude the continent’s leadership in the wake of the global economic downturn. 

Yet others suggest room for reinvigorated east-west partnership. Some experts see economic interests between China and Europe as signs of increased cooperation. Last year, Chinese investment in Europe continued to soar to the tune of some $12.6 billion — up 21 percent from 2011.  The recently proposed U.S-E.U. Free Trade Agreement may also yield large political and economic dividends for the transatlantic relationship.

Moving further into the 21st century, how will the global balance of power be defined? Will cooperation and partnerships be at a premium? Or will geopolitical rivalries persist? Join the World Affairs Council and the American Council on Germany to hear one of Germany’s most influential political leader’s insights regarding the ways in which the west can navigate the new global environment.

Hans-Ulrich Klose is Chairman of the German-American Parliamentary Group and a Member of the German Bundestag. He is also the Vice Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the Bundestag — a position he has held since 2002. Prior to his current position as Vice Chairman, he was Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the Bundestag in the Federal Foreign Office from 1998 to 2002. From 1994 to 1998, Mr. Klose was the Vice President of the Bundestag. His previous positions include Chairman of the Social Democratic Party’s Parliamentary Group in the Bundestag, First Mayor of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, and Treasurer of the Social Democratic Party of Germany. A former public prosecutor, Mr. Klose was first elected to the Bundestag in 1983.

Registration
ACG and World Affairs Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 2, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Co-sponsored by the American Council on Germany
With support from the German-American Business Circle (GABC)

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Thinking About the Future: Global Trends 2030 and Alternative Worlds
Political Salon
Thinking About the Future: Global Trends 2030 and Alternative Worlds

This program has been canceled

Dr. David Armitage, Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Europe, National Intelligence Council

June 24, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bar Marco, 2216 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

This program has been canceled. For more information, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

In 1964, Bob Dylan released the song “Times They Are a-Changin.’” Dylan’s lyrics spoke to the general anxiety and pronounced social change felt by many of his generation. Almost 50 years later, the same song could describe our modern world.

Released in December 2012, “Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds” is structured to stimulate thinking about the myriad of geopolitical changes characterizing the world today and their possible global trajectories over the next 15 to 20 years. Through this report, the National Intelligence Council offers a framework for thinking about the future and about the lasting implications of current trends.

The world of 2030 promises to be radically different from today. “Global Trends” provides a variety of scenarios regarding what tomorrow’s world might look like. It also identifies “tectonic shifts” in the coming decades – including the growth of the global middle class, widespread aging, increased urbanization, scarcity of food and water, wider access to lethal and disruptive technologies, the global shift of economic power away from the west, and the global energy demand.

What can we expect? Will China become the world’s reigning superpower? Will the power of nation-states remain, or is “the order rapidly fading?” Will global warming seriously compromise the integrity of our environment? Is there potential for large-scale, interstate conflict? Join the Council to learn more about tomorrow’s world.

David Armitage is Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Europe at the National Intelligence Council in Washington D.C. Prior to joining the NIC in November 2010, he was chief of the Regional Analysis Unit in the Office of Analysis for Europe at the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR). From 2007 to 2008, he served as the State/INR representative on the President’s Daily Briefing Staff. From 2001 to 2007, he was the principal European Union analyst in INR.

Dr. Armitage is also a senior fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis, a Washington-based think tank focused on Central Europe. He is the author of A Comparative Analysis of U.S. Policy Toward European Defense Autonomy and Europe’s Return: The Impact of the EU’s Newest Members. He holds a Ph.D. in government and politics from the University of Maryland.

Registration
There is no charge for World Affairs Council members | Non-Members: $15
Cash bar. Drink Specials! Appetizers will be served.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after June 20, 2013 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

This program has been canceled. For more information, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

James Clad
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The Geopolitics of Energy

James C. Clad
Distinguished Research Fellow, National Defense University
Former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asia

June 27, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Since the industrial revolution, the geopolitics of energy have been a key factor in global prosperity and security. Each shift in global energy patterns has ushered in changes in international politics. With the ever-growing global thirst for energy, the nexus between international security, politics, and energy is as important as ever.

Transportation systems – particularly in the United States – have become largely reliant on oil, so disruption of oil markets can bring a great power to a standstill. Access to energy is critical to sustaining growth in emerging economies such as China and India – not only to lift millions out of poverty, but to keep pace with burgeoning populations. Failure to deliver on the hope of greater prosperity could unravel even authoritarian regimes, and even more so democratic ones, as populations become more educated and demanding.

How do countries shape their grand strategies to meet their energy needs? What are the consequences of a shift away from petroleum-based energy markets? And, will a new energy order alter global politics in fundamental ways? Managing the transition to a new energy future will be one of the greatest challenges that the global community will face in the coming decades.

James C. Clad serves as a consultant to energy and investment firms and is the Distinguished Research Fellow at the National Defense University where he mentors defense and security officials from the Maghreb, the Near East, Turkey, the Gulf, and South Asia. From 2007 to 2009, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs. Prior to this appointment, Mr. Clad was Senior Counselor/Director for Middle Eastern Affairs for the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and, before that, served as Senior Counselor for Policy and Donor Coordination at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Before entering the U.S. government in 2002, Mr. Clad held the Henry Luce Foundation Professorship in South and Southeast Asian Studies at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and, concurrently, was Director for Asia-Pacific Energy for Cambridge Energy Research Associates. Mr. Clad’s career has concentrated on Asian risk issues, cross-border energy and infrastructure projects, U.S. national security challenges in Asia and — after 2002 — on working with business families in the Middle East.

Registration
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after June 24, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

A Ticking Bomb?: The Realities of Living in a ¯Nuclear World¯
Political Salon
A Ticking Bomb? The Realities of Living in a Nuclear World

Screening of the Documentary In My Lifetime and Discussion with Producer and Director Robert Frye

June 17, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Join the World Affairs Council and Bricolage Production Company for an evening of film and conversation with  Emmy Award-winning producer and director, Robert Frye, that explores the effect of nuclear weapons on an increasingly disconnected and unstable world. It has been nearly 70 years since U.S. atomic bombs detonated over the Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The world and the nature of warfare have not been the same since. Following World War II, an uneasy peace between the United States and Soviet Union — featuring nuclear posturing, “flash drills,” and geopolitical events such as the Cuban Missile Crisis — dominated the latter half of the 20th century.

Fast forward to today, and the threat of nuclear weapons remains potent and real. The debate still rages over how they should be used, and who should have them. Now outside the exclusive realm of superpowers, nuclear weapons have expanded our security lexicon, with references to “dirty bombs,” “non-state actors,” and “highly enriched uranium” becoming commonplace. Moving forward, how will the global community cope with the proliferation of such destructive weapons? What would it take to abolish them?

The documentary In My Lifetime grapples with war and peace. It is intended to spark global dialogue about a range of issues. Filmed in Europe, Japan, and the United States, and drawing on hundreds of hours of archival footage, the film has been produced for an audience of all generations, focusing on the possibility that we could someday move toward the elimination of this invention born out of a bygone era.

Robert E. Frye is the director and producer of the documentary film In My Lifetime, and founder of the Nuclear World Project. An Emmy Award-winning producer and director, he has created films, documentaries, and network news programs for over four decades. Prior to becoming an independent filmmaker, Mr. Frye worked as an executive producer at ABC News, the CBS and other networks. He is the founding Executive Producer of ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings and was also the Executive Producer of Good Morning America.On April 7, 2013, American Public Television released the broadcast version of In My Lifetime.

Registration
There is a $20 charge for this event. Refreshments are included.

Seating is limited and registration is required. No-shows and cancellations after June 13, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Osama bin Laden
Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Osama bin Laden
Videoconference

Peter Bergen
National Security Analyst for CNN
Director of the National Security Studies Program at the New America Foundation
Author of Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad

May 30, 2013

10:00-11:00 a.m. EDT

Videoconference

The May 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan officially ended the decade-long hunt for the al-Qaeda leader. In his speech to the American people announcing bin Laden’s death, U.S. President Barack Obama declared Operation Neptune Spear’s success “the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s efforts to defeat al-Qaeda.”

September 11, 2001, and May 2, 2011, are two seminal dates seared in the American national consciousness, but what really happened over ten, long years? Join the Council in this videoconference for high school students as a leading expert on national security and foreign policy examines the fact and fiction behind the hunt for Osama bin Laden.

Peter Bergen is the foremost authority on foreign policy, national security, and the new generation of terrorism. He is one of the few Westerners to interview Osama bin Laden. In addition to serving as CNN's terrorism analyst, he is the New York Times best-selling author of Holy War, Inc.Mr. Bergen serves as the Director of the National Security Studies Program at the New America Foundation in Washington D.C., where he leads the Foundation's analysis of terrorism, counterinsurgency, South Asia’s geopolitics, and other national security concerns. His latest book, Manhunt: The Ten Year Search for Bin Laden: From 9/11 to Abbottabad,was first published in 2012 and was the basis for an HBO documentary which aired on May 1, 2013.

Videoconference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Christina Unger at christina@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7970.

In partnership with AIU3 and Chartiers Valley High School.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Osama bin Laden  a Videoconference featuring  Peter Bergen
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon on the Occasion of the 82nd Annual Meeting
Learning from Abbottabad: Combating Global Terrorism in a Post 9/11 World

Peter Bergen
National Security Analyst for CNN
Director of the National Security Studies Program at the New America Foundation
Author of Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad

May 30, 2013

12:00 - 2:00 p.m.
The annual meeting will be held after the luncheon concludes.

Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market St, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

The May 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan officially ended the decade-long hunt for the al-Qaeda leader. In his speech to the American people announcing bin Laden’s death, U.S. President Barack Obama declared Operation Neptune Spear’s success “the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s efforts to defeat al-Qaeda.” The events of May 2 and their mid- to long-term implications will remain a topic of discussion for years to come.

Since bin Laden’s death, the manhunt for the world’s most notorious terrorist has been popularized in print, television, and in Hollywood. The recently-released HBO documentary, Manhunt, is based on Mr. Bergen’s latest bookandfollows the CIA insiders who tracked down bin Laden. From personal accounts of those who were in the Abbottabad compound to the version rendered in the Oscar-nominated film, Zero Dark Thirty, the journey leading to the Abbottabad operation was long and arduous — and fascinating.

September 11, 2001, and May 2, 2011, are two seminal dates seared in the American national consciousness, but what really happened over ten, long years? Join the Council as a leading expert on national security and foreign policy examines the fact and fiction behind the hunt for Osama bin Laden.

Peter Bergen is the foremost authority on foreign policy, national security, and the new generation of terrorism. He is one of the few westerners to interview Osama bin Laden.  In addition to serving as CNN's terrorism analyst, he is the New York Timesbest-selling author of Holy War, Inc. Mr. Bergen serves as the Director of the National Security Studies Program at the New America Foundation in Washington D.C., where he leads the Foundation's analysis of terrorism, counterinsurgency, South Asia’s geopolitics, and other national security concerns. His latest book, Manhunt: The Ten Year Search for Bin Laden: From 9/11 to Abbottabad,was first published in 2012 and was the basis for an HBO documentary which aired on May 1, 2013.

Global Terrorism in the News

"Bush's War on Terror is Over," Peter Bergen – CNN, May 24, 2013

"9 Myths About Drones and Guantanamo," Peter Bergen and Jennifer Rowland – CNN, May 22, 2013

"Terror Threat from Gitmo Prisoners is Exaggerated," Peter Bergen and Bailey Cahall – CNN, May 8, 2013

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, May 3, 2012
Peter Bergen shares insider details about the hunt for Osama bin Laden, and he also confirms the late terrorist leader's love of reading.
Click here for Part 1
Click here for Part 2

At this event, the Council will present the Donald E. Farr and George C. Oehmler Awards to an outstanding high school student and teacher in connection with the Council’s education programs.

Registration
Council Members: $50 | Non-Members: $65 | VIP: $75 | Table of eight (8): $400

VIPs receive a signed copy of Manhunt, VIP seating, and an invitation to a reception prior to the luncheon.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 27, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Interested in Sponsoring this Event?

Click here for more information.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Guy Martin
Political Salon
Reflections on the Boston Marathon Bombing
Defending the Indefensible: The Militarization of the Civilian Realm Since 9/11

Guy Martin, Senior Correspondent, Condé Nast

May 28, 2013

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

As the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing continues to unfold, the national discourse around concepts such as “homegrown terrorism”  and “self-radicalization” has ratcheted up. The events of April 15 will certainly be a matter of debate for the foreseeable future, but questions about how to defend Americans from such danger while also respecting individual freedoms remains a point of contention. In the midst of a fractured domestic political environment, the attack in Boston is a sobering reminder of the nexus between public safety, national security, and personal liberty.

Regardless of one’s political stance, the impact of the Boston bombing has left an significant imprint on American society. The attack left five dead and almost 300 wounded. In the aftermath of 9/11 and in an era of terrorism and counter-terrorism efforts at home and abroad, there is a new array of challenges in protecting the civilian realm.

How should Americans respond to tragedies like Boston? To what lengths should we go to be protected? What are the driving forces behind protecting those at their most vulnerable? In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, join the Council and a veteran journalist for a timely discussion on safeguarding our civilians and what it means to be safe in the United States.

Guy Martin covers central and eastern Europe and his native South, and has written for numerous magazines, including CondéNast Traveler, Garden & Gun, and The New Yorker. Since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania, he has been exploring the visible and invisible militarization of the civilian realm through in-depth articles that focus on issues such as airport security, protection of critical infrastructure (such as harbors, power plants, refineries and the New York Stock Exchange), counter-terrorism efforts by law enforcement, and data protection.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Food and refreshments will be provided.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 24, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

 

Register Now!

Juergen Trittin
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Transatlantic Energy Policy: The Implications of Shale Gas Extraction

Jürgen Trittin
Member of the Bundestag and Chairman of the Parliamentary Group Alliance 90/The Greens
Former German Minister of the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety

May 8, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

Germany has always found itself at the center of European affairs. From geopolitics to Europe’s economy, Germany is an integral player on all fronts. This is no different when it comes to energy. The oft-cited “energy transformation” — or Energiewende — ushered in radical changes to Germany’s approach to sustainable energy. By 2050, Germany’s greenhouse gas emissions are to be at 80 percent of 1990 levels. With multiple nuclear plants “phased-out,” the focus on renewables and natural gas has dialed up.

In many respects, it is what is underneath both Western Pennsylvania and northern Europe that raises the issue of energy security to a transatlantic and global level. With the pressure to wean off of fossil fuels, Germany has increased energy imports from its neighbors. Consequently, the debate over natural gas extraction has taken center stage. Once localized rhetoric in the U.S., terms such as “fracking” and “shale” are now part of the global energy lexicon. Solutions are at a premium, but hard to come by.

What can Germany and U.S. learn from each other in the midst of a “shale gas revolution?” How will Germany tackle the substantial challenge of its Energiewende? Join the Council and one of Germany’s senior political leaders for a conversation on prospects and consequences of shale gas extraction and what it means for the transatlantic partnership.

Jürgen Trittin has over 30 years of experience in German politics. His career began in the early 1980s, when he served in a  variety of roles in city and state government. From 1990 to 1994, Mr. Trittin was the Lower Saxony Minister for Federal and European Affairs and the Head of the Lower Saxony State Mission. Four years later, he was elected as a member of the Bundestag. From this position he was named German Minister of the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety — a post he held until 2005. Until 2009 he was vice-chairman of the Parliamentary Group Alliance 90/The Greens in the German Parliament, in charge of Foreign, Security and European Policy. In partnership with Bundestag member Renate Künast, Mr. Trittin was named Chair of the Alliance ‘90/The Greens Parliamentary Group in October 2009.

Registration
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 3, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

With support from the Heinrich Böll Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Schnepf
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Looking Back, Leaning Forward:
The U.S.-Polish Relationship and the Future of Europe

His Excellency Ryszard Schnepf
Ambassador of the Republic of Poland to the United States

May 10, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

One must survey over 1,000 years to gain some insight into the history of Poland. Transitioning from a centuries-old confederation of regional rulers and rival duchies, to the battlegrounds of World War Two, to a post-Cold War European democracy, Poland has much to reflect on — and much to look toward. Today, Poland is both modern and dynamic, playing an key role on both the European and global stage.

Recent developments in Poland are intriguing. Europe’s ninth largest country is seeking to adopt the euro — a topic of debate among market analysts and economists. Poland also boasts sizeable natural gas deposits but specific figures on its reserves are still to be determined. Nonetheless, shale gas proves to be a beacon of hope for those seeking independence in an increasingly competitive global energy market. On the security front, Poland and the U.S. work as NATO partners. Poland currently has some 2,000 troops in Afghanistan — many of whom conduct operations and help train Afghan national security forces. As one of NATO’s border countries, Poland recently agreed to participate in the NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance program. While U.S. long range interceptors have been reallocated to the Pacific region, Poland is also a strategic location for the missile defense systems placements intended to shield Europe and NATO allies from potential threats.

There is no doubt that Poland is at the center of a host of geopolitical issues — but what lies ahead? What are the consequences for Europe and the U.S. as Poland plans to formally adopt the euro? What can the U.S. and Poland learn from each other’s energy markets? With recent developments, where do U.S.-Polish security relations stand? Join the Council to hear Poland’s chief diplomat discuss Poland’s place in the world and the Polish-American partnership.

Ambassador Ryszard Schnepf was named Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the United States on September 22, 2012. During a diplomatic career spanning over twenty years, Amb. Schnepf has served as Poland’s chief diplomat in various postings. From 1991 to 1996, he was Poland’s ambassador to Paraguay and Uruguay. Later, he served as ambassador to Costa Rica and was also accredited to Belize, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Panama, and El Salvador. Amb. Schnepf was the Ambassador of Poland to the Kingdom of Spain for four years prior to his appointment to the United States. In addition to his chief diplomatic roles, Amb. Schnepf has held multiple positions in Poland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and in the Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Poland, including postings as the Undersecretary of State and the Secretary of State for foreign relations and security, respectively.

Registration
Council, Polish Falcons, and PCC Members: $45 | Non-Members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 3, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Andrea Solomon at 412-281-7970.

With support from the Polish Falcons of America and
the Polish Cultural Council


Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

U.S. - Japan Now:  Economic and Global  Corporate Strategies
U.S. - Japan Now:
Economic and Global Corporate Strategies

Matthew Goodman
William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy
Center for Strategic & International Studies

Takashi Hatchoji
Chairman
Hitachi America, Ltd

May 23, 2013

Registration: 11:30 a.m.
Luncheon/Presentation: 12:00 – 2 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

This high-level luncheon event will focus on the future economic outlook for Japan and the United States - and how economic, political, and security concerns may impact the global business of both countries. Attendees will also have the opportunity to hear about Hitachi America, Ltd. corporate strategies from Hitachi’s Chairman.

  
  Matthew Goodman
William E. Simon Chair in Political Economy
Center for Strategic & International Studies
 
    
  Takashi Hatchoji
Chairman
Hitachi America, Ltd

Presented by The Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania in partnership with the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, and the Pittsburgh Technology Council.


Register Today!
The Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, and Pittsburgh Technology Council Members: $45

Non-members: $60

Register by visiting http://tiny.cc/us-japan or contact the JASP at 412-433-5021.

Deadline for Registration is Thursday, May 16, 2013

The JASP thanks the National Association of Japan-America Societies, the Keizai Koho Center, Keidanren, and Hitachi America, Ltd for their generous support.

Questions?
Contact the JASP at 412-433-5021.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

SIT 2013
16th Annual Summer Institute for Teachers - Teaching Contemporary Global Issues
June 25-27, 2013

A Unique Opportunity for Secondary School Teachers, Administrators, and Education Coordinators

June 25, 2013

8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Duquesne University, 206 Canevin Hall, Pittsburgh, PA

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Duquesne University

Continuing Professional Education Credit available for this course through Allegheny Intermediate Unit, pending approval by the  Pennsylvania Department of Education

Graduate credit available through Duquesne University’s School of Education

The mission of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is to promote among secondary teachers and students in the region:

  • a global perspective
  • informed and independent thinking about world affairs
  • critical understanding about important issues in an interdependent world as they affect the nation and the region

Speakers

  • William Adams, Senior International Economist, PNC Financial Services Group
     
  • Dr. David Armitage, Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Europe, National Intelligence Council (NIC), Washington, DC
     
  • Dr. James C. Clad, Distinguished Research Fellow, National Defense University
     
  • Dr. Paul Sracic, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science, Youngstown State University, Ohio   

The Summer Institute for Teachers will:

  • help teachers to update their content knowledge, access resources necessary to prepare students for their futures, and create innovative lesson plans and curricula.

and will provide:

  • information on contemporary world issues and the global role of the United States
  • framework for looking at international issues that reflects their highly complex and interrelated nature
  • an orientation to additional resources which teachers can access to enhance existing curricula and to support understanding of global issues throughout the academic year
  • methods of integrating new knowledge into lesson plans and other experience-based classroom activities designed to enhance the effectiveness of world affairs education

What is the Summer Institute for Teachers?
The Institute is a three-day workshop which consists of presentations on contemporary world affairs, small group problem solving exercises, and lesson-planning sessions with direct application to your curriculum.

What are this year’s proposed topics?
This year’s workshops will focus on global trends and conflicts and will include a special session on developments in Latin America.

When is the Institute?
June 25 – 27, 2013 (Tuesday – Thursday)
8:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Where will the Institute be held?
College Hall, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA

Who can attend?
Secondary school teachers, administrators, and education coordinators are invited to attend the Institute.

Why is the Institute relevant?
The world is changing rapidly and textbooks simply cannot keep up.

This course will provide an update on important international issues, help you to develop a framework for critical thinking and problem-solving, and facilitate the creation of lesson plans and materials.

What is the cost of the Institute?
There is a $25 non-refundable registration fee for the Institute.

This fee will help to cover the cost of materials, as well as breakfast and lunch for all three days.  

Those seeking Continuing Professional Education credit are also responsible for the processing fee of $40 to the Allegheny Intermediate Unit.  A separate application for CPE credit will be distributed at the Institute.

SIT 2013 Resources

Use the links below to download the Summer Institute for Teacher Resources:

2013 SIT Agenda

2013 SIT Speaker Bios

Online Articles

Registration is now closed. For more information, please contact Amiena Mahsoob, Deputy Director of Education Programs, at 412-281-7973 or at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

This Institute is made possible in part through generous support of the Henry C. Frick Educational Fund of 
The Buhl Foundation
.

 

Why We Are Not Greece:  Pakistan¯s Economic Resilience
Breakfast Briefing
Why we are not Greece: Pakistan’s Economic Resilience

Yaseen Anwar
Governor of the State Bank of Pakistan

April 24, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In the midst of a lingering global economic downturn, virtually no country has been left untouched. Currently the debate rages within the euro zone over the pros and cons of austerity measures. Both the Greek and Cypriot economies have tiptoed on the verge of economic collapse. Many Americans still feel the strain of a “jobless recovery.” In the Middle East and North Africa, unemployment remains high — particularly among younger citizens. There is no shortage of anecdotes and analogies when it comes to diagnosing the health of the global economy.

With market watchers looking toward Asia, some argue that the economic potential of this century will not only come from China. India and Pakistan have robust consumer markets that show enormous opportunity. Yet a recent report from the Asian Development Bank refers to Pakistan’s economy as “directionless,” citing a “stalled effective policy response” and “structural problems” as the root causes for Pakistan’s current economic woes. Others argue that there is room for hope. Streamlining foreign remittances into Pakistan as well as technological advancements for mobile banking hint at promise. Prime Minister Justice Mir Hazar Khan Khoso recently stated that “economic stability of the country” is just as important as the upcoming elections slated for May of this year.

Many questions remain for this country of some 180 million people. Can financial sector innovation help chart a new course for the Pakistani economy? Will Pakistani leadership stabilize enough to guide the economy in a better direction? Join the Council for a discussion with one Pakistan’s leading financial officials on prospects for recovery and the future of Pakistan’s economy.

Yaseen Anwar was appointed as the State Bank of Pakistan’s seventeenth Governor in 2011 after serving as the Acting Governor. From 2007 to 2010, he served as the Deputy Governor of the State Bank, and managed the four clusters of the Central Bank. Over his 33 year career as a senior banker, he worked at major international financial centers including New York, London, and Paris with JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, and Merrill Lynch. Mr. Anwar was a Vice President at Merrill Lynch & Co. for nine years in New York and London from 1992 to 2001. He spent 15 years at Bank of America from 1976 to 1991 in various  capacities, including Vice President & Section Head for its Global Export Finance Group and the Middle East. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Registration
Council members: $15 | Non-members: $25
Participants must register to attend, Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

No-shows and cancellations after April 22, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

SSWA
38th Annual Summer Seminar on World Affairs
June 17-21, 2013

June 17, 2013

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Duquesne University

The Summer Seminar on World Affairs is a one-week, intensive look at some of the major current international issues confronting the United States in its political, economic, and security relations with the rest of the world. Participants will work to refine their understanding of overarching global issues, regional concerns, and policy implications.

The Summer Seminar will be held June 17-21, 2013 at Duquesne University near downtown Pittsburgh. Each day will run from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This unique program, designed for student leaders entering their junior or senior year in high school, is sponsored jointly by the World Affairs Council and Duquesne University.

Confirmed Speakers

  • William Adams, Senior International Economist, PNC Financial Services Group
  • Robert Frye, Award-Winning Documentary Director and Producer
  • Anne Korin, Co-Director, Institute for the Analysis of Global Security
  • Justin Merriman, Photojournalist, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  • Jen Saffron, Writer, Educator, and Curator of Photographs

Who can Participate?
Students who are entering their junior or senior year of high school are encouraged to apply for this program.

How Much Does it Cost?
Sponsoring organizations are offering full scholarships to the students who are selected to participate in this program.

Please Note: Participants must bring a bag lunch each day. Students must also arrange for their own transportation. Parking is available at Duquesne University at a discounted rate.

What Topics and Activities will be Included?

Participants Should Expect to:

  • Learn about and analyze global challenges that require a cross-disciplinary response
  • Hear from and work with experts on a range of international issues
  • Expand cross-cultural competencies in order to develop essential skills needed for the 21st Century workforce
  • Participate in real-world scenarios and simulations
  • Find out how global awareness can translate into a career in the future
  • Use technology to connect with peers abroad to discuss important international themes

How can Students Apply?
Registration is now closed.

Questions? 
Please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council at 412-281-7027 or at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

A Silver Bullet?  Economic Growth and Competitiveness through Greater U.S.-E.U. Cooperation
Global Intelligence Briefing
A Silver Bullet? Economic Growth and Competitiveness through Greater U.S.-E.U. Cooperation


This event has been canceled.

Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel
Special Advisor to the President of DePaul University in Chicago
Former United States Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues

April 18, 2012

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Bar Marco, 2216 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

There is still much ado about the oft-cited “Asia Pivot,” but when U.S. President Barack Obama announced plans for a new U.S-E.U. Free Trade Agreement, market watchers and opinion-leaders chimed in on the potential of such an initiative. After a year of “exploratory discussions,” it seems that momentum for a stronger U.S.-European partnership has not been entirely swept away by shifting economic and geopolitical trends in the Asia-Pacific.

Yet, there is still uncertainty in Europe. Germany is the largest economy on the continent and finds itself at the vanguard of the ongoing European austerity debate. Debt-crises — most notably in Greece, Spain, and Cyprus — captured the world’s attention. As the proposed U.S.-E.U. free trade agreement continues to take shape, many speculate on the financial opportunities for renewed transatlantic cooperation and what it means for business.

Questions remain: Will there be a resolution of the euro crisis and further European integration? What impacts will the U.S.-E.U. free trade agreement have on both the U.S. and European economies?  Join the World Affairs Council and Echo International as a veteran German-expert examines prospects for a reinvigorated U.S.-E.U. relationship.

J.D. Bindenagel is a career diplomat who achieved the rank of Ambassador. He is currently the Special Advisor to the President of DePaul University in Chicago. Amb. Bindenagel is an expert on Germany having served in the German Democratic Republic, West Germany, and the reunified Germany during 1989 and the unification process. He was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1999 as U.S. Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues, and was the Special U.S. Negotiator for "Conflict Diamonds.” Amb. Bindenagel is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP).

Registration
The cost for the event is $20.

A reception will be held prior to the event. Appetizers will be served. Cash bar. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 12, 2013 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

Echo International and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh are pleased to launch a new series of Global Intelligence Briefings. These events – which will be held on a quarterly basis – are tailored to the specific needs of Pittsburgh’s business community. They are designed to offer expert analysis of global economic trends as well as insights into the cultural and social elements of the international marketplace.

With special thanks to Bar Marco!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

UAE
Videoconference
A Closer Look at the United Arab Emirates

Dr. Alsaghira Al Ahbabi
Second Secretary

Mr. Saud H. Al Nowais
Commercial Counselor

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates, Washington D.C.

April 9, 2013

1:25-2:10 p.m. EDT

Videoconference

Register Now!

Since its founding in 1971, the United Arab Emirates has transformed into one of the economic powerhouses of the Middle East — a modern and dynamic hub of commerce, trade, and culture. In a rapidly changing region, the UAE has embraced diversity and promoted the role of women in the workforce and government.

How is the government of the United Arab Emirates encouraging innovation and sustainable growth? How is the leadership of the UAE addressing demographic opportunities and challenges? How has the government managed to weather the Arab Spring? What is the current state of the relationship between the United States and the United Arab Emirates? During this videoconference, students will have the opportunity to speak directly with two officials from the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates about these topics and more.

Dr. Alsaghira Al Ahbabi is Second Secretary at the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Washington, D.C. She directs the think tanks and NGOs office in the Political Department. Her duties include monitoring, studying, and analyzing current issues and policies that influence the Middle East, with a specific focus on the UAE. Dr. Al Ahbabi received a B.A from Cairo University, an M.A. from California State University — Sacramento, and her Ph.D. from George Washington University.

Saud Al Nowais, Commercial Counselor for the United Arab Emirates to the United States, took office in July 2009. Since then, he has focused on strengthening the bilateral trade relationship between the U.S. and the UAE, assisting both countries in identifying mutually beneficial trade and investment opportunities. Mr. Al Nowais worked on energy-related projects and programs, such as oil and gas initiatives, alternative sources of energy, and — most recently — the UAE’s nuclear program.

Participation via Videoconference
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Please contact Amiena Mahsoob at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7970.

Register Now!

 

Does the Maghreb Matter?
Panel Discussion and Reception
Does the Maghreb Matter? Building Peace Through Economic Development

Dr. Timothy Docking
Lead
Emerging Markets Funding Group
IBM Corporation

Dr. J. Peter Pham
Director
Michael S. Ansari Africa Center
Atlantic Council

Dr. Louis A. Picard
Director
Ford Institute for Human Security
University of Pittsburgh—GSPIA

April 10, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

As the events known as the “Arab Spring” continue to unfold, countries across the Middle East and Northern Africa struggle in their attempt to cope with the new realities that have emerged since the self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi in Tunisia in December 2010. Economic inequality and the lack of opportunities remain flashpoints between the people of North African nations and their governments.

Despite the efforts of international organizations and national governments to help rebuild civil society across North Africa, there are many challenges. What role can economic development play in creating the foundation for stability – or even prosperity – in the region? What steps can be taken to limit further conflict in this volatile region? Can the power of economics bring stability? Join the Council and the University of Pittsburgh’s Ford Institute for Human Security as three Africa-experts explore the prospects and challenges facing North Africa and what peace-building through economic development means for the region’s future.

Dr. Timothy W. Docking is based in Washington, D.C. where he leads IBM’s Emerging Markets Funding Group, a public sector business unit focused on the international development market in emerging economies worldwide. Before joining IBM, he was the Executive Secretary and Senior Advisor to the CEO of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (2004 – 08). Dr. Docking was a White House Fellow, and served three years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Mali. has testified before Congress and comments extensively in the media.

Dr. J. Peter Pham is the Director of the Michael S. Ansari Africa Center at the Atlantic Council. He previously served as Senior Vice President of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, and editor of its bimonthly journal, American Foreign Policy Interests. Dr. Pham contributes to a number of online publications including the National Interest and Foreign Policy, and he comments regularly on broadcast and print media outlets including CBS, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, BBC, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and Washington Post.

Dr. Louis A. Picard is the Director of the Ford Institute for Human Security at the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He has served as a consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, the U.S. Information Agency, UNDP, and U.S. Department of State. His primary area of interest is Africa and he has had extensive fieldwork in Southern Africa — including three years in South Africa. He has worked as a teacher, researcher, and consultant in sixteen different African countries.

Registration
Council members and GSPIA students/faculty: $15 | Non-members: $25

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after April 5, 2013 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Supported by the U.S. Institute of Peace: Public Education for Peacebuilding Support Initiative

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Small but Mighty: The United Arab Emirates and the Nexus of Geopolitics
Breakfast Briefing
Partnership on the Arabian Peninsula: The U.S., the United Arab Emirates, and the Nexus of Geopolitics

Dr. Alsaghira Al Ahbabi
Second Secretary

Saud H. Al Nowais
Commercial Counselor

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates, Washington D.C.

April 9, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Register Now!

When examining the Middle East, one can easily recognize how the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is centrally located in one of the most geopolitically important regions of the world. Resting on the eastern horn of the Arabian Peninsula, the UAE’s shores flank three waterways making international headlines: the Arabian Gulf, the Strait of Hormuz, and the Gulf of Oman – all of which form a critical channel of shipping lanes for world energy supplies, through which 35 percent of global seaborne oil trade passes.

The UAE – a country of only 32,000 square miles – has enjoyed the fruits of this nexus. The UAE contains the world’s seventh largest proven oil reserve as well as substantial natural gas reserves. In just 41 years since the country’s founding, the UAE  is now the largest export market in the Middle East, having transformed into a modern and dynamic hub of commerce, trade, and culture. In a rapidly changing region, the UAE has demonstrated its role as a security partner. It is the only Arab country to have participated in five U.S.-led or coalition engagements: Libya, Afghanistan, Bosnia, Somalia, and the 1990 Gulf War.

As the region adapts to the changes brought forth by the Arab Spring, how has the UAE responded? What lies ahead? Join the Council for an informative discussion on the UAE’s role in the global economy, its position in an evolving Middle East, and its relationship with the United States.

Dr. Alsaghira Al Ahbabi is Second Secretary at the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Washington, D.C. She directs the think tanks and NGOs office at the Political Department. Her duties include monitoring, studying, and analyzing current issues and policies that influence the Middle East, with a specific focus on the UAE. Dr. Al Ahbabi received a B.A from Cairo University, an M.A. from California State University — Sacramento, and her Ph.D. from George Washington University.

Mr. Saud Al Nowais, Commercial Counselor for the United Arab Emirates to the United States of America, took office in July 2009. Since then, Mr. Al Nowais has focused on strengthening the bilateral trade relationship between the U.S. and the UAE, assisting both countries in identifying mutually beneficial trade and investment opportunities. Mr. Al Nowais worked on energy-related projects and programs, such as oil and gas initiatives, alternative sources of energy and most recently the UAE’s nuclear program.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 5, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel Special Advisor to the President of DePaul University in Chicago Former United States Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues
Breakfast Briefing
Quo Vadis Germania — Whither Germany? Making of a Nation and German Leadership in the 21st Century

Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel
Special Advisor to the President of DePaul University in Chicago
Former United States Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues

April 19, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

The “German Question” — the role Germany plays in Europe — has dominated the European political stage for hundreds of years. During the Cold War, German President Richard von Weiszäcker famously proclaimed that the German Question would remain open as long as the Brandenburg Gate remained closed. The 1989 revolution brought down the Berlin Wall, opened the Brandenburg Gate, and led to unification of the Federal Republic of Germany in 1990 — but it did not end the debate over the role of a unified Germany.

The question remains: What role does Germany play in Europe and on the world stage? And, how is the German national identity being shaped in the 21st century? Germany has been a major player within Europe, and over the past eight years Chancellor Angela Merkel has demonstrated leadership nationally and across the continent. Germany is the largest economy in Europe and finds itself at the vanguard of the ongoing European austerity debate.

Why is Germany leading the resolution of the euro crisis and promoting further European integration? Why does Germany deploy its military around the world for humanitarian purposes? With national elections slated for September, Germany remains a fascinating country to watch. Join the Council and a veteran German-expert as prospects for Germany’s future are examined.

J.D. Bindenagel is a career diplomat who achieved the rank of Ambassador. He is currently the Special Advisor to the President of DePaul University in Chicago. Amb. Bindenagel is an expert on Germany having served in the German Democratic Republic, West Germany, and the reunified Germany during 1989 and the unification process. He also worked on the Balkan Wars, North Atlantic Treaty Organization security policy and expanded NATO membership, and German national security issues between 1972 and 2002. He was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1999 as U.S. Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues, and was the Special U.S. Negotiator for "Conflict Diamonds.” Prior to his diplomatic career, he was assigned to the U.S. Army’s 3rd Infantry Division in Germany. Amb. Bindenagel is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP).

Registration
The price for members of the ACG, GABC, or Council is $15. The price for non-members of these organizations is $25.
Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 12, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.


With thanks to the
German-American Business Circle (GABC) for supporting this event!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Miguel Diaz Former Director of the South America Program at the Center for Strategic  International Studies (CSIS)
Policy Discussion and Luncheon
After Chavez: What’s Next for Venezuela?

Miguel Diaz
Former Director of the South America Program
Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

April 1, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Just weeks after his death, the debate rages over the legacy of Hugo Chavez. Foreign policy analysts and pundits have offered eulogies ranging from caustic to something resembling admiration. No matter where one stands, one fact is clear: After fourteen years, Venezuela is no longer under the control of Chavez. South America’s fifth largest country is now led by his heir apparent, Nicolás Maduro — the interim president. But, will this last?

Despite a relatively clear line of succession, the stakes for the country of 29 million people are high. Beyond the sometimes-heated (and at times bizarre) rhetoric between Chavez and the U.S. government, a robust trade relationship between the two countries exists. Venezuela is currently the thirteenth largest oil-producing nation in the world — and one of the top four foreign oil suppliers to the U.S. Access to the U.S. market is essential for Venezuela: American-produced machinery, agricultural products, and medical technology are but a few major imports critical to the Venezuelan economy. Yet Venezuela’s relationship with countries on the U.S.’s proverbial “black list” — most notably Iran — has chilled diplomatic relations.

In a period of transition, whither Venezuela? In terms of both domestic politics and foreign policy, this is a country worth watching. With one of the most outspoken critics of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America gone, will American influence remain a flashpoint issue in the region? On the heels of such dramatic change in Venezuela, join the Council for a discussion with a veteran Latin America analyst.

Miguel Diaz is an Intelligence Community Associate at the U.S. Department of State. In this capacity, he provides the National Intelligence Officer for Latin America with unclassified expert advice on a wide range of security issues impacting Latin America and serves as an interlocutor between the intelligence community and non-government experts. He is a former member of professional staff of the House Intelligence Committee, where he led oversight of the U.S. intelligence community’s activities in Latin America.Earlier in his career, Mr. Diaz was the Director of the South America Program at the Center for Strategic International Studies, and worked as a CIA Analyst in the early 1990s. He also spent ten years as an investment banker in New York, reaching the position of Senior Latin American Economist/Strategist for Nikko Securities Inc.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after March 25, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breaking Barriers: Educate a Girl and Change the WorldEdit Content
Back by Popular Demand!
Breaking Barriers: Educate a Girl and Change the World

Special Screening of Girl Rising and Panel Discussion

March 25, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Due to the overwhelming interest in this event, we have reached capacity. If you would like to be added to the wait list, please complete an online registration form. We will contact you as seats become available.

Click here to be added to the wait list now.

After "selling out" on March 12, Bricolage, the World Affairs Council, and the YWCA are hosting a second screening of selected chapters from "Girl Rising" and organizing another panel discussion to delve deeper into the challenges girls around the world face as they strive to be educated.

The documentary “Girl Rising” opened in theaters on March 7. It's release was timed to coincide with International Women’s Day.  This film tells the unforgettable stories of nine girls from different countries around the world who face a variety of challenges – from arranged marriages to child slavery. Yet, despite these obstacles, these girls are able to get an education and change their lives. “Girl Rising” is an inspirational film from Academy Award-nominated director Richard E. Robbins and the award-winning Documentary Group.

Following the screening of selected scenes from the film, there will be a panel discussion with education experts to kick off a discussion of the variety of challenges girls face in getting an education. Come back and continue the conversation!

Click here to watch the Girl Rising trailer. Tell your friends!

Registration
There is no charge for this event. Refreshments are included. Seating is limited and registration is required.

Due to the overwhelming interest in this event, we have reached capacity. If you would like to be added to the wait list, please complete an online registration form. We will contact you as seats become available.

Click here to be added to the wait list now.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage.

With special thanks to the Eden Hall Foundation and the Global Campaign for Education-U.S.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Anne Korin Co-Director Institute for the Analysis of Global Security
Breakfast Briefing
It’s the Energy Mix, Stupid!
Energy Security through Fuel Competition

Anne Korin
Co-Director
Institute for the Analysis of Global Security

April 5, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Reed Smith Centre, 225 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Since 1992, when Bill Clinton’s campaign strategist James Carville coined the phrase “The economy, stupid!” as part of the strategy to unseat President George H.W. Bush, politicians, journalists, and pundits have riffed off the phrase. Twenty years later if there is a similar mantra for aspiring political leaders and the public alike, it should probably read: “It’s the energy mix, stupid!”

The National Intelligence Council recently released “Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds,” a framework that has predicted U.S. energy independence within the next fifteen years. The U.S. is not alone in this pursuit. In Germany, there is a push to phase out nuclear energy and move toward renewables. Natural gas is a major economic driver in the U.S., but has also emerged in Eastern Europe. Poland and Ukraine look to their own burgeoning natural gas industries as ways to extricate themselves from dependence on Russian fuels. Following Fukishima, Japanese leaders are weighing the costs and benefits of having a robust nuclear energy sector. Others argue for nuclear energy’s potential to illuminate cities around the globe and fuel generations of reliable power sources.

The world over, decision makers and opinion leaders are reevaluating their respective countries’ energy mix, and looking for ways to become energy independent. How should the U.S. and the international community envision energy security in the 21st century? Join the Council as a leading global energy analyst discusses what energy security really means — and how the global race for it affects us all.

Anne Korin is co-director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security (IAGS). She is an adviser to the United States Energy Security Council, the highest level group ever assembled to address the energy issue. She also chairs the Set America Free Coalition and the Mobility Choice for a Secure America Coalition. She appears in the media frequently and has written articles for Foreign Affairs, The American Interest, The National Review, and the Wall Street Journal. She is co-author of Energy Security Challenges for the 21st Century (2009), Turning Oil into Salt: Energy Independence through Fuel Choice (2009) and Petropoly: The Collapse of America’s Energy Security Paradigm (2012). Her education includes an engineering degree from Johns Hopkins University and work towards a doctorate at Stanford University.

Registration
The event is free for Council members. Non-members: $15
Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 1, 2013 will be charged.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

With special thanks to Reed Smith

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Global Struggle for Girl¯s Education
The Global Struggle for Girls' Education

Dr. Urvashi Sahni
Nonresident Fellow
Global Economy and Development
Center for Universal Education
Brookings Institution

Dr. Edwin Gragert
Director
Global Campaign for Education - U.S.

March 12, 2013

12:30 - 1:45 p.m. EDT

Videoconference

The challenges facing girls came to a fore when the world learned of the attempted assassination of fourteen-year old Malala Yousafzai for her activism regarding girls’ education in Pakistan. However, she is not alone. Every day, 61 million children are shut out of primary school and 34 million adolescent girls are denied the right to education. Leading the fight for education in countries around the world are young people — like you — who are passionate about the right to education for everyone. Join this conversation with education experts to learn about the struggle for education worldwide.

Dr. Urvashi Sahni is currently a Nonresident Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Center for Universal Education. She is the Founder and Chief Executive of Study Hall Educational Foundation. She is a leading expert in school governance, curriculum reform and teacher training with a special focus on girls education and the use of technology in education. Her current research focuses on developing and scaling her Girls’ Empowerment Program in India with the help of affordable technology.

Dr. Edwin H. Gragert is Director, Global Campaign for Education-US. Earlier he served for 21 years as Executive Director of iEARN-USA. Since 1990 he helped iEARN pioneer educational uses of innovative technologies and teacher professional development to facilitate on-line collaborative project-based learning among schools in the U.S. and 130 other countries. Earlier he served as Executive Director of an international youth exchange program, and also worked for the International Relations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. Ed received a BA in Japanese political science from the University of Washington. He received an MA in Korean History a PhD in Japanese history from Columbia University.

Videoconference Registration
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7970.

In partnership with AIU3, Quaker Valley School District, and Global Campaign for Education - U.S.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

A Glimpse Behind the Curtain:  Trafficking and the Shadow Economy
A Glimpse Behind the Curtain:
Trafficking and the Shadow Economy


Event Postponed

A Panel Discussion for High School Students

March 15, 2013

9:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Derry High School, 994 N Chestnut Street Ext., Derry, PA 15627

This event has been postponed. Please check back for a rescheduled date.

  • Drug trafficking is estimated to be one of the world’s largest global businesses, at around $322 billion annually.
     
  • Human trafficking affects every country in the world, whether as a country of origin, transit, or destination for victims. It is estimated that there are around 27 million victims of human trafficking today, and that 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders annually.
     
  • Arms trafficking allows insurgents, armed gang members, pirates, and terrorists to multiply their force through the use of unlawfully acquired firepower.

Each year, the “Shadow Economy” sees hundreds of billions of dollars moving around the world as a result of illegal activity. The black market promotes conflict, bribery, and corruption, and can be so severe as to destabilize national economies. Resulting funds often support illicit individuals, such as terrorist groups or gangs.

Join the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and a panel of experts to discuss the realities and implications of the three biggest aspects to the shadow economy: drug trafficking, human trafficking, and arms trafficking.

This event has been postponed. Please check back for a rescheduled date.

Questions?
Please contact Christina Unger at 412-281-7027 or christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Women in Cuba: Emerging Trends and Lessons for U.S. Policy to the Region
Political Salon
Women in Cuba: Emerging Trends and Lessons for U.S. Policy to the Region

Event Canceled

Sarah Stephens
Executive Director
Center for Democracy in the Americas

March 19, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

This event has been canceled. For more information, please call Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

Ninety miles. This is the distance that separates the United States from Cuba. On clear days, one can see the shores of Cuba from the Florida Keys. So close, yet so far away... This expanse has been emblematic of the U.S.-Cuban relationship for decades. By far the largest Caribbean island both in geography and population, Cuba has been a flash point in American politics, and has left many divided on how to approach the Communist nation closest to the U.S. mainland.

With Raúl Castro’s recent announcement that he will resign at the end of his current term and the Cuban government’s efforts to introduce economic reform, it is well worth watching the developments in Cuba. Half of Cuba’s population of 11 million people are women — and they are gaining momentum as an important political voice. This month, the Center for Democracy in the Americas is releasing a report titled “Women’s Work:  Gender Equality in Cuba and the Role of Women Building Cuba’s Future.” Join the Council and a leading Cuba expert to learn more about the influential island nation and those who shape it — as well as the economic, political, and social influencing not just Cuba but Latin America as a whole.

Sarah Stephens is the Executive Director of the Center for Democracy in the Americas (CDA), which she launched in 2006. A long-time human rights advocate, she began her work in the 1980s at El Rescate, a center for Central American refugees in Los Angeles, and then worked for the Hollywood Women’s Political Committee on human rights. She later founded and directed Artists for a Hate Free America, an entertainment industry-backed organization geared toward encouraging youth involvement in human rights and civil rights issues.

In her current capacity, Ms. Stephens works with U.S. policymakers, journalists, and others to change the debate on U.S. foreign policy toward the Western Hemisphere. She has led numerous delegations to Latin America on fact-finding and research missions. She has advocated for changes in U.S. policy toward Cuba before Congress, and at forums in the United States and in Latin America. Her commentary has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Washington Times, Huffington Post, and the Havana Note.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Featuring Cuban food from CONFLICT KITCHEN.

This event has been canceled. For more information, please call Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.


 

With special thanks to Bricolage and Full Pint Brewing!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Competition, Collaboration,  and Your Future in the Global Workforce
Competition, Collaboration, and Your Future in the Global Workforce

A Panel Discussion and Video Conference for High School Students

April 23, 2013

9:00 - 10:30 a.m.

Videoconference and Woodland Hills High School, 2550 Greensburg Pike, Pittsburgh, PA 15221

Do you hope to be successful in an interdependent world?

Do you know what skills you will need to be successful in
a global workforce?

Have you wondered why cross-cultural communication and
cultural understanding are so important?

Today’s students will enter a global and diverse workforce where the need for employees who can speak world languages and can collaborate cross-culturally is imperative. Whether you plan to work abroad or to never leave your hometown, globalization will bring the world to you. No matter what field you’re considering, our changing world means that you will need new skills and knowledge to be competitive and successful in the future. 

Hear from a panel of prominent international business leaders -- and interact with your peers locally and internationally -- to learn about intercultural skills, critical languages, new business practices, exciting international careers, and the changing global marketplace.

Featured Panelists

Nicholas Hamilton-Archer
Director of Recruitment and Business Development
EMBA Worldwide & The Center for Executive Education at the
University of Pittsburgh

Annamaria Fato
Senior Manager
Zurich Insurance Company Ltd

Jonathan Hill
The Compton Group, LLC

Guillermo Rocco
Staff Geophysicist
Shell Appalachia FDP Team

The world is changing…are you ready?

There is no cost to attend this program. Participants may attend in-person or via videoconference.

Participation at Woodland Hills High School
Click here to register.

Participation via Videoconference
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council
by phone at 412-281-7027 or by email at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in partnership with Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3 and Woodland Hills High School.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Special Screening and Panel Discussion  Girl Rising
Breaking Barriers:
Educate a Girl and Change the World

Special Screening of Girl Rising and Panel Discussion

March 12, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage,  937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

There is overwhelming interest in this event! We have reached capacity and started a waiting list.  If you would like to be added to the waiting list, please email Andrea Solomon at andrea@worldpittsburgh.org.  We will contact you as seats become available.

Join Bricolage, the World Affairs Council, and the YWCA for an evening of film and discussion about the challenges girls around the world face as they strive to be educated.

Opening in theaters on March 7, the release of “Girl Rising” is timed to coincide with International Women’s Day. Be among the first to see excerpts from this gripping documentary which tells the unforgettable stories of nine girls from different countries around the world who face a variety of challenges – from arranged marriages to child slavery. Yet, despite these obstacles, these girls are able to get an education and change their lives. “Girl Rising” is an inspirational film from Academy Award-nominated director Richard E. Robbins and the award-winning Documentary Group.

Following the screening of selected scenes from the film, there will be a panel discussion with education experts from around the world who will drill down on the variety of challenges girls face in getting an education. The panel will include experts from India and Turkey as well as others involved with education initiatives at home and abroad.

Registration
There is no charge for this event. Refreshments are included.

There is overwhelming interest in this event! We have reached capacity and started a waiting list.  If you would like to be added to the waiting list, please email Andrea Solomon at andrea@worldpittsburgh.org.  We will contact you as seats become available.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

This event is presented as part of Bricolage’s Fifth Wall series, which breaks down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events by bringing the world at large to the local stage.

With special thanks to the Eden Hall Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

New Opportunities: The Franco-American Partnership and the Transatlantic Relationship
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
New Opportunities: The Franco-American Partnership and the Transatlantic Relationship

His Excellency François Delattre
Ambassador of France to the United States

March 28, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Throughout the 20th century, France and the United States have enjoyed a strong partnership. As with any relationship, there have been ups and downs. Transitioning from the 20th to 21st centuries, the United States and France have renewed partnerships in the historical alliance of NATO and look to future opportunities with the development of President Obama’s recently announced free trade agreement between the U.S. and the E.U.

As the geopolitical landscape changes, so do the roles of different actors. We may currently be in a new era of French foreign policy. France’s recently elected President François Hollande emphasized France’s ability to strike out on its own if necessary. To some, President Hollande’s position is nothing new, as France was in the vanguard during NATO’s operations in Libya in 2011. With regard to the proposed U.S.-E.U. trade agreement, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius referred to the prospect as "an excellent thing” during a recent press conference with U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry.

Nearly 4,000 French military personnel are now working with Malian troops to root out and destroy al-Qaeda linked insurgents throughout the North African nation. New economic prospects on the horizon hint at a closer U.S.-French dialogue. What do these developments mean for the Franco-American partnership? Join the Council and France’s chief diplomat in the U.S. for a discussion on France’s developing foreign policy and its dynamic relationship with the United States.

His Excellency François Delattre, the Ambassador of France to the United States, was appointed to this position in February 2011. He had previously been posted as the Ambassador to Canada. Mr. Delattre is a career diplomat. His career began in 1989 when he was assigned to the French Embassy in Berlin, where he was in charge of matters pertaining to the economic impact of Germany’s unification and the environment. Since then, Mr. Delattre has worked in numerous positions in Europe and North America and within the French government. He has worked in the Foreign Ministry with the Strategic Security and Disarmament Department, as a member of Foreign Minister Alain Juppé’s cabinet, and as Deputy Director of the Foreign Minister’s office. Mr. Delattre is a graduate of Sciences Po and l’ENA with a degree in International Law.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after March 22, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

U.S.-Pakistan Relations and Life in the State Department
A Conversation with Dr. Scott Kofmehl
U.S.-Pakistan Relations and Life in the State Department

Dr. Scott Kofmehl
Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan

February 22, 2013

9:15-10:45 a.m. ET

Videoconference

Register Now!

Are you interested in an international career?

Have you wondered why cultural competence and diplomacy are so important?

Do you want to learn more about the relationship between the United States and Pakistan?

This is an opportunity for students in grades 9-12 to participate in a videoconference program with Dr. Scott Kofmehl about his journeys and service abroad with the State Department, as well as his perspective about the current relationship between U.S. and Pakistan.

Dr. Scott Kofmehl is the Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan. A Pittsburgh native and North Allegheny Senior High School graduate, he earned his Bachelor’s of Arts in International Political Economy from Juniata College, his Master’s degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and his Ph.D. from the London School of Economics. Dr. Kofmehl joined the Foreign Service in 2006 and has served in various diplomatic posts -- including Vice Consul to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Mexico, and as an Economic Officer to the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. Slated to serve at the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan until July 2013, Dr. Kofmehl and his wife Aryani Manring -- also a U.S. Foreign Service Officer -- are currently based in Islamabad.

Participation via Videoconference
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Please contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7970.

In Partnership with AIU3 and North Allegheny School District

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

H.E. Mohamed M. Tawfik Ambassador of the Arab Republic of Egypt to the United States
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Egypt Today

H.E. Mohamed M. Tawfik
Ambassador of the Arab Republic of Egypt to the United States

March 1, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

In partnership with the American Middle East Institute

How is America’s longtime strategic partner and ally in the Middle East managing the extraordinary pace of change in the Arab world’s largest nation?

What is the climate for global investment and business opportunity?

Is the Egypt of the headlines different from the reality on the ground?

Uncover the answers to these questions and more as the American Middle East Institute and the World Affairs Council partner to host a timely and informative public policy discussion with Egypt’s new Ambassador to the United States.

H.E. Mohamed M. Tawfik was appointed as the Egyptian Ambassador to the United States in September 2012. From 2011 to 2012, he was the Ambassador to the Republic of Lebanon. He joined the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1983, serving as an attaché to the International Organizations Department within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Later, he spent four in the United States, serving as the respective Third Secretary and Second Secretary in the Egyptian Embassy in Washington, DC before serving as First Secretary in the Egyptian mission in Harare, Zimbabwe. Amb. Tawfik has also served as the Egyptian Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations and the Egyptian Ambassador to Australia.

Registration
Online ticket sales have closed. For more information, please call: 412.995.0076 or email: info@americanmei.org.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

No-shows and cancellations after February 26, 2013 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

Drawing Down, Building Up: Rebalancing to Asia
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Drawing Down, Building Up: Rebalancing to Asia

Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert
Chief of Naval Operations, U.S. Navy
Member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

March 4, 2013

12:00 - 1:15 p.m.
This event will start promptly at noon.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In his recent State of the Union address, U.S. President Barack Obama declared that “a decade of war is now ending.” This era of conflict has centered on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. As the last U.S. combat brigade left Iraq in December 2011, proclamations from Washington confirmed that a U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan would follow in 2014. Drawing down from a robust combat force to the oft-cited “advisory role” in Afghanistan, U.S. leadership looks to place the load-bearing responsibility on the developing capabilities of both the Afghan National Police and the Afghan National Army.

As the United States focused on drawing down in one area, there has been a build-up in another. Coined the “Asia Pivot,” the allocation of U.S. resources — both man and material — to the Asia-Pacific is an important element of President Obama’s foreign policy. Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton referred to this as the “Pacific Century.” A rising China, a robust trade market, and the complexities of both bilateral and multilateral arrangements only amplify the high stakes already attached to the region.

How does the “Asia Pivot” reconcile U.S. power projection vis-à-vis its Pacific rivals? What role will the U.S. military play in this complicated framework? Join the Council and one of our nation’s top military commanders for an engaging discussion on U.S. rebalance to the Pacific region, and what it means for 21st century American power and the future of U.S. foreign policy.

Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, a native of Butler, PA, was appointed as the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) on September 23, 2011. He is also a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the body which advises the Secretary of Defense, the National Security Council, and the President on military and security matters.

Adm. Greenert began his career in the Navy in 1975 after graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy. He has  served in various fleet support and management positions. Prior to his post as CNO, Adm. Greenert was Vice Chief of Naval Operations. He has received several individual medals as well as those for unit performance, which he feels best represent naval service. The individual awards include: Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, and the Vice Admiral Stockdale Award for inspirational leadership.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after March 1, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In partnership with the Navy League

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breakfast Briefing
Off-the-Record Breakfast Briefing
The United States, Pakistan, and Afghanistan: Now and Beyond 2014

Dr. Scott Kofmehl
Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan

February 27, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

RAND Corporation, 4570 Fifth Avenue, Suite 600, Pittsburgh, PA  15213

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Whether it is the ongoing challenges in Kashmir, internal political unrest, or the International Security Assistance Force’s presence in Afghanistan, Pakistan is at the center of global affairs. Boasting a population of some 180 million people and a pivotal geopolitical location, Pakistan is a key actor in the region. 

The U.S.-Pakistani relationship is complicated and at times contentious, as U.S. troops with Afghanistan and a well-documented drone campaign along Pakistan’s border present obstacles to open and productive dialogue. In 2013, how will the relationship between Washington and Islamabad play out? Is there potential for cooperation or more controversy?

Join Pittsburgh native and the Chief of Staff to the Ambassador to Pakistan for a first-hand, off-the-record account of U.S.-Pakistani relations and what it means on the current global stage. 

Dr. Scott Kofmehl is the Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan. A Pittsburgh native and North Allegheny graduate, he earned his Bachelor’s of Arts in International Political Economy from Juniata College, his Master’s degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, and his Ph.D. from the London School of Economics. Dr. Kofmehl joined the Foreign Service in 2006 and has served in various diplomatic posts — including Vice Consul to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Mexico, and as an Economic Officer to the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. Slated to serve at the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan until July 2013, Dr. Kofmehl and his wife Aryani Manring — also a U.S. Foreign Service Officer — are currently based in Islamabad.

Registration
No charge for members | Non-Member: $15
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 20, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 With special thanks to the RAND Corporation.

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Foreign Policy Challenges Facing the New Secretary of State
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Foreign Policy Challenges Facing the New Secretary of State

Cheryl Benton
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State
Bureau of Public Affairs
U.S. Department of State

February 15, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

On February 1, John Kerry assumed office as the 68th United States Secretary of State. At the start of President Obama’s second term — and with a new foreign policy and security term — there is no shortage of issues: the rise of China, Iran’s power pursuit, the Syrian civil war, a resurgent nuclear North Korea, and a 2014 withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan. That is only the short list. Add the complexities of the “Asia Pivot” and evolving political dynamics in Central and South America and one appreciates the scope of Secretary Kerry’s  docket.

Secretary Kerry inherits a global system undergoing dramatic transformation on a daily basis. Within the last three years, entire regions of the globe have undergone sweeping political change and transition, all the while redefining traditional power structures and challenging long-held institutions. With such tumult, strong and effective leadership is critical.

Only weeks into his appointment, what are the challenges facing Secretary Kerry and the Obama Administration 2.0? With myriad pressing issues, how will our country’s chief diplomat prioritize? Join the Council for a Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon with a veteran U.S. State Department official and gain insight into the future of U.S. foreign policy and the challenges that continue to shape it.

Cheryl Benton was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary for the State Department’s Bureau of Public Affairs in May 2009. Before joining the Department of State, she gained more than twenty years of political and public affairs experience and expertise. She brings her extensive background and knowledge of managing complex public policy, advocacy, and regulatory issues for Fortune 500 companies, associations, and organizations, developing and implementing grassroots and grasstops strategies and campaigns. The Bureau of Public Affairs carries out the Secretary's mandate to help Americans and foreign audiences understand the foreign policy priorities of the President and Secretary of State. In her capacity as Deputy Assistant Secretary, she leads the Department's outreach and strategic planning effort, including utilizing the State Department’s assets in outreach to national and international media outlets.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after February 13, 2013  will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Iran on the Global Stage
Iran on the Global Stage
A Video Conference on Current Issues

Event Canceled

Reza Marashi
Research Director
National Iranian American Council

February 14, 2013

8:40 - 10:30 a.m.

Video Conference

This event has been canceled. If you have questions, please contact Marissa Germain at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7048.

In Partnership with AIU3 and Chartiers Valley High School

Given Iran’s aspirations to achieve regional hegemony, some members of the international community have expressed concern over Iranian geopolitical influence. Iran’s pursuit of a nuclear weapon has subsequently heightened tensions with its neighbors as well as the United States. Furthermore, Iran has established itself as an important power player within international crises such as the conflict in Afghanistan, the Syrian Civil War, and global terrorism.

It is no secret that the U.S. and Iran have a contentious relationship. As the new Obama administration solidifies and the new secretaries of state and defense become established, will there be any significant changes in U.S. policy toward Iran — or should we expect more political conflict? How does the U.S. military fit into this geopolitical puzzle? What prospects does 2013 hold? 

Reza Marashi joined the National Iranian American Council in 2010 as the organization’s first Research Director. Prior, Mr. Marashi worked in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. State Department and before that he was an analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies monitoring China - Middle East issues. He has also served as a Tehran-based private strategic consultant on Iranian political and economic risk. Mr. Marashi has published articles in the New York Times, National Interest, Atlantic, and Foreign Policy. He has been a guest contributor to the BBC, CNN, NPR, ABC News, TIME Magazine, and Financial Times.

This event has been canceled. If you have questions, please contact Marissa Germain at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7048.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Regional Politics of Latin America and U.S.¯Latin American Relations
Neighbors to the South:
Regional Politics of Latin America and U.S. - Latin American Relations

Keynote Address:
Sarah Stephens
Executive Director for Center of Democracy in the Americas

March 20, 2013

9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. EDT

Videoconference and Fox Chapel Area High School, 611 Field Club Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15238

Fox Chapel Area High School and the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Latin American Studies

Present a Regional Seminar and Video Conference for high school students

Today questions regarding Latin America’s future have captured the conversation about the region. As the international community drives attention to the state of women, how will a relaxed Cuba affect  the gender equality conversation? What will Latin American politics be like post-Chavez? As the region deals with these questions, what will the role of the United States be?

Join us for a two-part regional seminar. First, a video conference with Ms. Sarah Stephens from the Center of Democracy for the Americas  to explore Cuba’s role in Latin America. Second, breakout sessions at Fox Chapel Area (not video conferenced)  will discuss range of topics on how technology is impacting the role of civil society to Spanish only sessions, among others.

Sarah Stephens is the Executive Director of the Center for Democracy in the Americas (CDA), which she launched in 2006. A long-time human rights advocate, she began her work in the 1980s at El Rescate, a center for Central American refugees in Los Angeles, then worked for the Hollywood Women’s Political Committee on human rights issues. She later founded and directed Artists for a Hate Free America, an entertainment industry-backed organization geared toward encouraging youth involvement in human rights and civil rights issues.In her current capacity, Ms. Stephens works with U.S. policymakers, journalists, and others to change the debate on U.S. foreign policy toward the Western Hemisphere. She has spoken widely across Latin America and Congress, including appearances before Congress to advocate changes in U.S. policy towards Cuba. Her commentary has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Washington Times, Huffington Post, and the Havana Note.

Schedule
9:00 am: Registration and dial in time
9:30 - 10:45 am: Keynote, Q&A and video conference with Ms. Sarah Stephens
10:50 am - 12:30 pm: Breakout Presentations for students participating at Fox Chapel Area High School

Participation at Fox Chapel Area High School
Click here to register.

Participation via Videoconference
A limited number of schools can register to participate via videoconference. Videoconference equipment is required. Click here to register.

There is no charge for this Regional Seminar. Confirmation details will be sent upon registration. Please register online by March 15, 2013.

Questions?
Contact Marissa Germain at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7048.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

In the Hot Seat: Fifty Years Since the Cuban Missile Crisis ¯  What the Future Holds for Global Peace and Security
In the Hot Seat
Joseph Cirincione: Fifty Years Since the Cuban Missile Crisis - What the Future Holds for Global Peace and Security

Joseph Cirincione
President, Ploughshares Fund

February 21, 2013

9:30 - 11:00 a.m. ET

Video Conference and Moon Area High School

Register Now!

A program of the World Affairs Councils of America with support provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Now the subject of history books, the Cuban Missile Crisis is perceived as the relic of a bi-polar world in which the Soviet Union and the United States were the only superpowers. This event was the closest the world has ever come mutually assured destruction; the resulting war could have killed upwards of 200 million Russians and Americans. But is this just history? Or is a similar standoff brewing between North Korea and the United States? Or Iran and Israel?

Fifty years later, there are even more nuclear states, and with them comes an increased threat of proliferation. During this program, students will have the opportunity to ask Joseph Cirincione questions regarding the lessons learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis, post-Cold War nuclear proliferation, and what the future holds for global security.

Joseph Cirincione is the President of the Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation with a focus on nuclear weapons policy. He serves as a member of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's International Security Advisory Board and as a professor at the Graduate School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Mr. Cirincione is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His commentary has been featured in numerous print news sources and television news outlets. He has appeared on ABC News, CBS News, BBC News, CBC, RT, NHK, and Al Jazeera, as well as being featured in the Huffington Post, Financial Times, and Moscow Times. Mr. Cirincione is the author of Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons (2008) and Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Threats (2005). He earned his B.A. from Boston College and his M.S. from the Georgetown School of Foreign Service.

Participation via Video Conference
A limited number of schools can register to participate via video conference. Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council at christina@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7970.

In Partnership with AIU3 and Moon Area High School

Register Now!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Poland¯s Shale Gas Dream
Breakfast Briefing
Poland’s Shale Gas Dream

Dimiter Kenarov
Pulitzer Center Fellow and Freelance Journalist

February 6, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Poland is at the forefront of shale gas development in Europe. Long suffering the ruin of invading armies from both east and west, Europe’s ninth largest country is now investing in its own power play — and it may change the energy dynamics of the continent. Shale gas is the latest energy craze to hit Europe, and Poland sits on an estimated six trillion cubic feet of natural gas reserves. Yet this number may change, as more current approximations are expected by 2014. Nonetheless, this potential source of energy provides Poland with the leverage to flex its geopolitical muscles and emerge from the shadows of some of its more powerful neighbors.

Although still in the early stages of exploration, the natural gas development has turned into a major ideological tool and a centerpiece of Polish economic and national security policy. While weaning itself off of Russian natural gas imports, Poland is building its own export partnerships with countries such as Ukraine and Germany. Coal still accounts for approximately 90 percent of the Poland’s energy production and is predicted to remain its primary power source, but roughly 35,000 square miles have been allocated for over 100 exploratory concessions led by dozens of domestic and international companies.

Many have speculated that Poland is not ready for such an energy boom. However, investment and government support in the natural gas industry suggest that it’s full speed ahead to obtain Poland’s energy independence. Is natural gas a source of Poland’s — and Europe’s — economic revival? Sound familiar? Do Poland and Pittsburgh have a shared experience? As Western Pennsylvania positions itself as an energy center, join the Council for a special event focusing on the economic, geopolitical, and environmental aspects of Poland’s natural gas future.

Dimiter Kenarov is a freelance journalist based in Istanbul, Turkey, and a contributing editor at the Virginia Quarterly Review. His work has also appeared in the Nation, International Herald Tribune, Atlantic, Esquire, Outside, and others, and has been twice anthologized in The Best American Travel Writing. Within these respective publications, Mr. Kenarov’s has written on economics, the environment, politics, literature, and conflict. He is currently working on a book-length project about the Black Sea. Mr. Kenarov was born and raised in Sofia, Bulgaria and studied at both Middlebury College and the University of California-Berkeley.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Register now! This event has limited seating. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 4, 2013 will be charged. 

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With special thanks to the Buhl Foundation!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The U.S.-Iran Conflict: Two Perspectives
Political Salon
Perspectives on the U.S.-Iran Conflict and the Narco-Criminal Threat

COL John A. Vermeesch, U.S. Army  
Eisenhower Fellow
United States Army War College

Lieutenant COL Warren J. Curry, U.S. Marine Corps.

February 13, 2013

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Forecasting what the future holds for the U.S.-Iranian relationship is difficult. One thing is for certain no matter one’s position on Iran: It’s complicated. Regularly in the news because of its nuclear ambitions, Iran balances its aspirations for regional hegemony with an increasingly concerned international community. Nonetheless, last May’s P5 +1 talks held in Baghdad offered some measured optimism that diplomacy and mutual dialogue will prevail.

Yet rhetoric stemming from regional neighbors such as Israel suggest that a nuclear Iran is a dangerous Iran. Iran’s roots certainly burrow deep — intertwined within Afghanistan, Central Asia, the Syrian Civil War,  global terrorism, and an Arab-Israeli peace agreement. Diplomacy within this framework is as much a tightrope walk as it is a journey through a minefield. All the while, the potential for some form of military intervention lingers somewhere along the horizon — although at the risk of untold consequences. As a result of this potent alloy of geography, history, and regional politics, some speculate that progress with Iran will have to come incrementally — if at all. 

As Barack Obama enters his second term as U.S. President, will there be any game changes in U.S. policy toward Iran — or should we expect more impasse? How does the U.S. military factor into this geopolitical puzzle? What prospects does 2013 hold? Join the Council as two leading experts on U.S.-Iranian relations offer analysis into one of the most vital geopolitical issues facing the international community. 

COL John A. Vermeesch has spent 22 years serving in command and staff positions in operational units in the U.S. Army. He served in Operation Desert Storm and twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. His awards include the Meritorious Unit Commendation, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal and Service Medal, Combat Infantryman’s Badge with star, Ranger Tab, Parachutist, Air Assault and Expert Infantryman’s Badge.

Lieutenant COL Warren J. Curry, U.S. Marine Corps. Lt Col Curry holds a B.S. in Accounting from John Carroll University. He enlisted as a Marine Corps officer in 1994 and completed Navy Flight School in 1997. He originally trained as an AH-1W SuperCobra pilot, and transitioned to the MV-22 Osprey in 2005.  LtCol Curry deployed with the Osprey in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; marking the second time the Osprey deployed to combat operations.  He has also been deployed with Humanitarian Aid Operations in East Timor and various exercises as part of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable). Prior to attending the War College he was the Commanding Officer of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 561 “Pale Horse,” a Marine MV-22 Osprey squadron located at MCAS Miramar. His awards and decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, and Navy Achievement Medal.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Refreshments included.  

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 6, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

With special thanks to Bricolage and Full Pint Brewing!

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

SAP
Student Ambassador Program
Cultural Competency and International Speaker Visits
November 2012 – May 2013

May 2, 2013

Today’s students will be tomorrow’s leaders. As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, knowledge and understanding of other cultures is becoming more essential.

The Student Ambassador Program capitalizes on middle school students’ inherent curiosity to increase their awareness, understanding, and appreciation of world cultures and global issues. By connecting schools with Pittsburgh’s global community, the program is able to enhance student’s cultural competency.

Students will broaden their knowledge of global cultures, geography, and current events around the world. This program is an excellent compliment to diversity initiatives and anti-bullying campaigns and will help engage your students in the world around them.

What is the Student Ambassador Program?
The Student Ambassador Program is a comprehensive global education program for middle schools in the Pittsburgh region. Established by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in 2006, the Student Ambassador Program has expanded into a partnership program involving the University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies Center as well as Global Solutions Pittsburgh.

The program is for middle school students and their teachers. The program menu consists of a school visit on Cultural Competency for new schools, an International Speaker school visit, and the culminating Student Ambassador Conference for student leaders. Participating schools are provided with an extensive resource guide and support throughout the program.

Following the program, students complete projects to share their newfound global knowledge.

Program Menu
The Student Ambassador Program is designed to be flexible and responsive to schools’ needs, therefore all menu items are available to participating schools. It is recommended that schools participate in all components of the program. However, in recognition of busy school schedules and restricted budgets, schools are able to select the components they would like to participate in.

Cultural Competency Visit (starting in November for new schools)
During this school visit, students will hear from partnering organization staff who will discuss the importance of cultural competence and engage students in a number of activities to prepare them to interact in a globalized world. Students will also reflect on their own culture and deconstruct cultural stereotypes.

International Speaker Visit (December through April)
During this school visit, an international speaker specially chosen for your students will discuss his or her country and culture and engage students in cultural activities. Previous presentations have included music, dance, art, language, and stories from around the world. Many students comment that their previous impressions and stereotypes are transformed through this visit.

Student Ambassador Conference (May 2, 2013)
The Student Ambassador Conference is the culminating event for the program year and serves as a reward for Student Ambassadors. It will take place on Thursday, May 2, 2013 from 9:00-11:30 a.m. at the University of Pittsburgh. At the Conference, students will see a performance, hear from a keynote speaker, and have the opportunity to attend breakout sessions with international speakers who will engage students in a cultural learning exercise or activity. Following the Conference, Student Ambassadors and teachers will have the option of taking a complimentary guided tour of the Nationality Rooms. The Conference is limited to 350 student leaders — usually 5-15 students per participating school.

Click here to download the Student Ambassador Study Guide.

Who Participates in the Program?
Twenty-three middle schools from Pittsburgh and surrounding areas participated in the program last year, which reached over 2,000 students. Social studies, gifted, world language, English, and art teachers alike can find their curricula enhanced through involvement in this program. All students, particularly those who do not usually have the opportunity to experience global cultures, will benefit from participation. Space is limited to 30 schools per academic school year.

What is the Cost?
The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center, and Global Solutions Pittsburgh believe global education is essential for all students. Therefore, this program is offered free of charge for middle schoolers and teachers in the Pittsburgh region. Schools will need to cover transportation to and from the Conference.

Registration
Teachers are requested to provide complete information during registration, including preferred dates for school visits, the number of student participants, and grade levels. Curricular information and speaker preferences are also requested. Your detailed registration information will enable the partnering organizations to tailor the program to your school

Questions?
Please contact Amiena Mahsoob, Deputy Director, Education Programs, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh email:amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or phone: 412-281-7973.

For more information, please visit:

World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh:
www.worldpittsburgh.org

University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center:
www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/

Global Solutions Pittsburgh:
http://globalsolutionspgh.org/

 

Ambassador Claudia Fritsche
Breakfast Briefing
Changing Perceptions: Liechtenstein and the Art of Public Diplomacy

Ambassador Claudia Fritsche
Ambassador of Liechtenstein to the United States

February 7, 2013

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Long known for its banking center, Liechtenstein may be difficult to find on a map. Nonetheless, one of Europe's smallest countries has plenty to boast about — all with a population of just over 36,000 (almost eight times smaller than the city of Pittsburgh). As a highly industrialized free-market economy, Liechtenstein has an unemployment rate of under three percent and offers over 60,000 jobs domestically and abroad. Moreover, having signed and ratified numerous tax information exchange agreements, Liechtenstein has been able to significantly improve its transparency and its financial regulatory system while preserving the integrity and future growth of its financial services sector.

Though it is not a member of the E.U., Liechtenstein does belong to European Economic Area and the Schengen Agreement, allowing for it to be a well-integrated participant in the European economy. Export-oriented, Liechtenstein's robust economy is not immune to the current ails of the European recession — requiring a balance of its own unique interests with its dependency on the European and global economies.

As Liechtenstein has taken dramatic changes to prepare itself for the 21st century, it seeks to shed its more negative image as a 20th century tax haven. How will diplomacy play a role in this process? After 10 years in D.C, how has the Embassy of Liechtenstein improved its partnership with the U.S. as Washington seeks to crack down on tax evaders and other financial criminals? Join the Council as we welcome Liechtenstein's senior diplomat in the U.S. and find out what lies ahead for her country and Europe.

Ambassador Claudia Fritsche assumed her duties as the first resident Ambassador of Liechtenstein in Washington at the beginning of October 2002, after leaving her post in New York, where she had served as the Permanent Representative of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the United Nations from 1990 to 2002. Ambassador Fritsche served as Vice President and Member of the General Committee of the United Nations General Assembly during its 48th Session. She joined the Office for Foreign Affairs of the Principality of Liechtenstein on June 1, 1978, and served in a variety of diplomatic functions, inter alia as Secretary to the Liechtenstein parliamentary delegations to the Council of Europe and to the European Free Trade Association, as well as within the Liechtenstein Embassies in Berne and Vienna.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after January 31, 2013 will be charged. 

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 

Firefights and Foot Patrols: Documenting America¯s Engagement in Afghanistan and Iraq
Political Salon / Fifth Wall
Firefights and Foot Patrols - Documenting America's Engagement in Afghanistan and Iraq

Carmen Gentile, Foreign Correspondent for USA Today and Filmmaker Ralph Vituccio

January 23, 2013

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh

Event Recap

Join the World Affairs Council and Bricolage for an evening of political discourse through the lens of Pittsburgh’s own. Begin with an excerpt of In Service, a documentary produced by Bricolage in conjunction with Pittsburgh Filmmakers and introduced by the film’s director Ralph Vituccio. This film chronicles Pittsburgh’s connections to the Iraq War. Then participate in a discussion led by Carmen Gentile, foreign correspondent for USA Today and war photographer, whose accounts capture the raw and visceral effect of being on the frontlines in Afghanistan. To close the evening Vituccio will join Gentile for a riveting Q&A session.

The trip to Afghanistan from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is a long one. Roughly 20 hours of air travel via multiple connections puts you 10,000 miles away from home in the heart of Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul. This is a trip Pittsburgh-native Carmen Gentile has been making for years as he documents the conflict in Afghanistan. Breaking away from the daily media headlines and talking heads, Mr. Gentile journeys with foot patrols along the Af/Pak border, and hunkers down with U.S. soldiers during fire fights. By doing so, Mr. Gentile has added multiple dimensions of storytelling — raw and visceral in effect.

Breaking down the barriers between scripted storytelling and current events in the world at large, Bricolage introduces the “Fifth Wall” program — a way  of bringing world events to the local stage. Perhaps nothing compliments this initiative better than Mr. Gentile’s latest experience in Afghanistan. Embedded with troops for a month in late 2012, the foreign correspondent/backpack journalist reported for USA Today on a myriad of issues facing Afghanistan — from the upcoming troop withdrawal to the 12th Christmas U.S. soldiers have celebrated in a war-zone.

From his trips have come a collection of photos and video pieces that give a vivid and personal account of the conflict in Afghanistan. Join the Council and Bricolage Production Company as we blend the “Fifth Wall” with international affairs to see Afghanistan through the lens of Pittsburgh’s own.

Carmen Gentile has written for some of the world's leading publications including the New York Times, TIME, Newsweek, and USA Today. He also produces online video reporting for the New York Times and TIME. Mr. Gentile has covered both of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, embedding with soldiers on the frontline. His work has also taken him to Nigeria, where he reported on the continuing unrest in the oil-rich Niger Delta. Beginning his international reporting career in the late 1990s, he has been based in Egypt, Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, and Haiti. In September 2010, Mr. Gentile was shot by a rocket-propelled grenade while reporting on U.S. and Afghan forces in eastern Afghanistan. Following a lengthy recovery, he resumed embedded reporting for USA Today and other publications. Mr. Gentile recently returned from Afghanistan, where he was embedded with U.S. troops in the Ghazni Province.

Registration
There is a $20 charge for this event. Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after January 18, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259 or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org.

With special thanks to the Heinrich Böll Foundation.

With special thanks to Full Pint Brewing as our exclusive beer sponsor!

Event Recap

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Joseph Cirincione
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
North Korea and Iran: The 21st Century’s Cuban Missile Crisis?

Joseph Cirincione
President, Ploughshares Fund

February 21, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

October 2012 marked the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The events in October 1962 were part of an almost five-decade-long standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union that kept the prospect of nuclear conflict on a hair trigger. Nuclear proliferation became a shared siren song of a generation of leaders intent on dominating the global balance of power. The Soviet Union ultimately collapsed, but the post-Cold War world has witnessed no shortage in nuclear proliferation challenges. Over a decade into the 21st century, we are still coping with the role of nuclear weapons in geopolitics.

The United States and Russia remain to world’s two dominant nuclear powers; however, the nuclear “club” has  expanded. In addition to the U.K. and France, countries such as Pakistan, India, North Korea, and China have all developed nuclear weapons since World War II. Iran is currently in pursuit of its first nuclear weapon — a well-documented issue fiercely debated within the international community. Israel also maintains an inventory, outspoken about the possibility of nuclear-capable neighbors. For the U.S., projected costs for owning such weapons will cost billions over the next decade, as the strategic triad is in need of recapitalization. Yet, there is room for some optimism. The United States and Russia have instituted the New START Treaty, which puts in place plans to decrease each country’s respective nuclear arsenal.

What can we draw from these trends? As traditional powers draw down their arsenals, what positions will other countries take with regard to their own nuclear programs? Is policy being outpaced by procurement?  Join the Council for an engaging discussion with a leading commentator on international security, and learn more about the challenges still lingering under the shadow of nuclear weapons.

Joseph Cirincione is the President of the Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation with a focus on nuclear weapons policy. He serves as a member of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's International Security Advisory Board and as a professor at the Graduate School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Mr. Cirincione is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. His commentary has been featured in numerous print news sources and television news outlets. He has appeared on ABC News, CBS News, BBC News, CBC, RT, NHK, and Al Jazeera, as well as being featured in the Huffington Post, Financial Times, and Moscow Times. Mr. Cirincione is the author of Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons (2008) and Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Threats(2005). He earned his B.A. from Boston College and his M.S. from the Georgetown School of Foreign Service.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after February 13, 2013  will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

A program of the World Affairs Councils of America with support provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Bridging the Parallel:
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Bridging the Parallel: Prospects for Peace in the Korean Peninsula

Ambassador Glyn T. Davies
Special Representative for North Korea Policy, U.S. Department of State

January 16, 2013

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Officially in a state of cease-fire, the Korean conflict is still simmering. For over sixty years, tensions have risen on the relatively small peninsula that lies at a primary geopolitical crossroads in the Asia-Pacific. A two-and-a-half mile wide swath of land separates South Korea from North Korea. The Korean Demilitarized Zone (popularly known as the DMZ) is both functional and symbolic. In one way, it serves as a physical separation of the Communist north and the democratic south, but it also represents a political gap between both sides that continues to brew hostility.

In many respects, the political dynamics in each country could not be more different. Ruled by the Kim regime since 1948, North Korea is backed by China and remains largely enigmatic to its western counterparts. Contrarily, South Korea enjoys a robust alliance with the United States and boasts the 20th largest economy in the world. To many, North Korea’s nuclear weapons program and rumored human rights violations have largely maligned the country as a regional instigator. South Korea serves as an important trade hub for Pacific imports and exports. Adding to the tension, both military and political provocations are commonplace — exacerbated recently by North Korean missile launches and artillery barrages, as well as joint U.S.-South Korea military exercises close to contested territory. In sixty years, much has changed, but much has stayed the same.

As the Korean peninsula enters its seventh decade of conflict, are there prospects for peace — or renewed conflict? How is an increasingly isolated North Korea balancing itself after a major transition in leadership? Will the rise of China push South Korea into closer relationships with the U.S. and other regional powers? Join the Council as one of America’s leading North Korean negotiators examines the path for reconciliation and cooperation in one of most highly-contested areas in the world.

Ambassador Glyn T. Davies is the Permanent Representative of the United States to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the United Nations in Vienna. Amb. Davies is a  career diplomat serving in numerous posts including the U.S. embassy in London and Zaire (the Congo) and working as the executive secretary to the National Security Council staff. As the Permanent Representative to the IAEA, he advances U.S. interests to counter illicit networks, terrorism and corruption, and works to promote peaceful usage of nuclear energy. Amb. Davies received a B.A. from Georgetown University and a Masters from the National Defense University.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend.  No-shows and cancellations after January 9, 2013 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

National Security Briefing for Teachers
National Security Briefing for Teachers
National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond

February 12, 2013

Registration: 8:00 a.m.
Program: 8:30 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a National Security Briefing for Teachers: National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond.

With increasing green-on-blue attacks in Afghanistan, conflict continuing in Syria and Gaza, island disputes in Asia, and increasing cyberthreats, the Obama Administration will have to contend with and prioritize a wide-ranging set of national security issues over the next four years. How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy?

ACT 48 hours (5) will be available (pending approval).

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 4, 2013

There is NO CHARGE for this teacher workshop. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Questions?
Please contact Marissa Germain at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7048, or by email at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond
Regional Seminar for Students
National Security Challenges
in 2013 and Beyond

Greater Latrobe Senior H.S.

Panelists from the United States Army War College

February 14, 2013

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Greater Latrobe Senior H.S.
Latrobe, PA

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond.

With increasing green-on-blue attacks in Afghanistan, conflict continuing in Syria and Gaza, island disputes in Asia, and increasing cyberthreats, the Obama Administration will have to contend with and prioritize a wide-ranging set of national security issues over the next four years. How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy?

There is no charge for the Regional Seminar.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 4, 2013.

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Marissa Germain at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7048, or by email at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

National Security Challenges
Regional Seminar for Students
National Security Challenges
in 2013 and Beyond

Upper Saint Clair H.S.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.
9:00 a.m. - 1:05 p.m.
Optional Session 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Upper Saint Clair H.S., Pittsburgh, PA

February 13, 2013

Panelists from the United States Army War College

 Online registration is now closed. If you are interested in attending this event, please contact Marissa Germain at 412-281-7048 or email at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org.

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond.

With increasing green-on-blue attacks in Afghanistan, conflict continuing in Syria and Gaza, island disputes in Asia, and increasing cyberthreats, the Obama Administration will have to contend with and prioritize a wide-ranging set of national security issues over the next four years. How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy?

There is no charge for the Regional Seminar.

Please note: Lunch is not included as part of the Seminar. Students must bring their lunches.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 4, 2013

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Online registration is now closed. If you are interested in attending this event, please contact Marissa Germain at 412-281-7048 or email at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

National Security Challenges
Regional Seminar for Students
National Security Challenges
in 2013 and Beyond

South Side Area H.S and Grove City College

Panelists from the United States Army War College

February 11, 2013

This seminar will be held at two locations:

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
South Side Area H.S., Hookstown, PA
Panel Discussion

10:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Grove City College, Grove City, PA
Panel Discussion

 The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: National Security Challenges in 2013 and Beyond.

With increasing green-on-blue attacks in Afghanistan, conflict continuing in Syria and Gaza, island disputes in Asia, and increasing cyberthreats, the Obama Administration will have to contend with and prioritize a wide-ranging set of national security issues over the next four years. How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy?

There is no charge for the Regional Seminar.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 4, 2013

Confirmation materials will be sent via email prior to the event.

Click here to register online for the South Side Area H.S. program.

Click here to register online for the Grove City College program.

Questions?
Please contact Marissa Germain at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7048, or by email at marissa@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Academic WorldQuest 2013
Academic WorldQuest

11th Annual International Knowledge Competition for High School Students

February 8, 2013

Registration: 9:00-9:30 a.m.
Program: 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Lunch will be provided

Soldiers and Sailors National Military Museum and Memorial, Oakland

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412.281.7027 or by email at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

In cooperation with the International Business Center Katz Graduate School of Business University of Pittsburgh

Academic WorldQuest is a knowledge-based competition with questions focusing on international affairs, current events, the global economy, geography, world history, and general knowledge about the world.

Who Can Play?
This is a team competition. Teams consist of four high school students from the same school. In order to allow for as many schools as possible to participate, only one team per school district is permitted to enter the competition.

This event is offered at NO CHARGE and is open to teams of high school students and their accompanying teachers or chaperones.

What Topics Will Be Covered?

  • Round 1: World Cultures
  • Round 2: Geography
  • Round 3: Flags
  • Round 4: The World in the 1960s
  • Round 5: Global Economy and Business
  • Round 6: People in the News
  • Round 7: Current Events
  • Round 8: Global Health
  • Round 9: East Asia

How Can Teams Prepare?
The Council provides a preparation guide that explains the content of each round and provides suggested websites and resources to help teams prepare for the competition. Click here to download the preparation guide.

In addition, the Council will provide practice questions (and answers) on Facebook and Twitter. Become a fan of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @WorldPittsburgh for access to these special practice questions!

What is the Grand Prize?
The 1st place team will advance to the National Academic WorldQuest competition to be held in Washington, DC on April 27, 2013, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America. Participants at the national competition will enjoy a weekend of exciting activities and a discussion with a prominent speaker. These events, as well as transportation and hotel costs, will be covered for the winning team and one teacher sponsor or chaperone.

There will also be awards for 2nd and 3rd place teams. All competition participants will receive t-shirts.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412.281.7027 or by email at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

David McKean Senior Advisor to the United States Secretary of State Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
A United Front: Leading Through Civilian Power

David McKean
Senior Advisor to the United States Secretary of State
Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review

December 13, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Food and beverages included. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after December 4, 2012 will be charged.

Questions?
Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

Hong Kong: America¯s Bridge to Asian Growth
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Hong Kong: America’s Bridge to Asian Growth

Louis Ho
Regional Director, Americas, Hong Kong Trade Development Council

December 11, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Acquired as a British colony after the First Opium War in the mid-19th century, Hong Kong has long proved itself to be a vital trading center for the global economy. Remaining under British control until 1997, Hong Kong has since become a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. Boasting a sprawling skyline and some seven million people, Hong Kong enjoys substantial independence from the Chinese government, with a free market economy and a semi-autonomous governing structure  set in place by its centuries-old position as a trading crossroads for global powers.

Long considered a go-between for East-West trade relations, Hong Kong’s role in the global economy is evolving. The rise of China’s economy over the last twenty years has led Hong Kong’s leadership to debate the currency value of the Chinese yuan as well as the effect trade surpluses have on the closely-linked economies. It is not all contentious, as a booming Chinese economy has uniquely placed Hong Kong as a key financial center for both new and established markets. Within this position lies strength, allowing Hong Kong’s free market economy to open new doors to trade and enterprise while its close ties to China offer relative protection from the fluctuations of the global economy.

As U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration implements its “Asia Pivot,” Hong Kong continues to find itself an integral part of geopolitics and the global economic system. What does the onset of the “Pacific Century” hold for Hong Kong? What new developments lie within the U.S.-Hong Kong relationship? Join the Council as a senior member of Hong Kong’s economic community discusses new opportunities and challenges facing U.S. involvement in the rapidly-growing Asian market.

Louis Ho is the Regional Director, Americas of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC). With a tenure of over 20 years with the HKTDC,. Mr. Ho oversees the seven HKDTC branches throughout South, Central and North America. Over the course of his career, Mr. Ho directed promotional activities for the Council in emerging markets such as Latin America, Africa and the Middle East. He has also held various positions in offices in London, Miami, Tokyo and Hong Kong. While Director of the Japanese branches of HKTDC, Mr. Ho created and implemented trade relations and strategies between Hong Kong and Japan. Mr. Ho earned his Bachelors degree from Gonzaga University, Washington. He also attended the Harvard Business School Executive Program in Hong Kong.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Food and beverages included. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after December 4, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

America Pivots East - Again: Implications, Images, and Reality in U.S.-Japan Relations
Breakfast Briefing
America Pivots East - Again: Implications, Images, and Reality in U.S.-Japan Relations

Dr. William Farrell
Adjunct Professor at the Naval War College
Former Chairman of the National Association of Japan-America Societies

November 29, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Deloitte, 2500 One PPG Place, 25th Floor, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In late 2011, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton declared the beginning of America’s “Pacific Century.” She said that America’s foreign policy goals in the Asia-Pacific in the coming decade require increased investment in economic, diplomatic, and strategic terms. Some pundits and analysts point to Washington’s “Asia Pivot” as a relatively new initiative. History suggests otherwise. The United States has been a Pacific nation for over a century. One of its key counterparts has been Japan.

Reaching back as far as Matthew Perry’s “Black Ships” anchored in Tokyo Bay during the 1850s, to the brutality of both sides during World War II, the relationship between the United States and Japan has been both collaborative and contentious. Factor in the American occupation of Japan and the close relationship during the Cold War, and a complicated geopolitical partnership emerges. In 150 years, the U.S. and Japan have been allies, sworn enemies, and allies once more.

Economically, relative prosperity has been achieved through mutual gain. Currently boasting the first and third largest economies in the world, the U.S. and Japan account for over 30 percent of the world domestic product. Beyond the economy, scheduled joint naval exercises indicate a strong military alliance — but one underlined by regional tensions and the ongoing island disputes in the East Asia Sea.

With nationalism rising throughout Asia, what trends will characterize the future of the U.S.-Japanese relationship? For a complete understanding of America’s “Asia Pivot,” the history of U.S. involvement with Japan is a good place to begin. Join the World Affairs Council  and the Japan-America Society for a perspective on U.S. involvement in the Pacific, and how a look back can predict what lies ahead.

Dr. William Farrell  is the former Chairman of National Association of Japan-America Societies. He is currently an Adjunct Professor at the Naval War College. Dr. Farrell served in the U.S. Air Force for 20 years, and was stationed in Japan for six years as a commissioned officer. After the Air Force, he worked as Executive Director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Tokyo and as Chairman of an Asian-focused consulting company. In June 2012, he was awarded the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun with Gold Rays by the Japanese government for his work to promote strong relations between the U.S. and Japan. Dr. Farrell has a B.A. in History from Fordham University, an M.A. from Florida State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

There is a no charge for this event. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 26, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 

Dr. Michael Klare
Breakfast Briefing
The Final Frontier: Natural Resources and America’s Energy Dilemma

Dr. Michael Klare
Director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies, Hampshire College
Author of The Race for What’s Left: The Global Scramble for the World’s Last Resources

November 14, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With an estimated global population of nine billion people by 2050, natural resources will become increasingly scarce. In his critically acclaimed 2001 book, Resource Wars, Dr. Michael Klare focused on the potential for conflict around access to natural resources. Over ten years later, much of the narrative remains the same. Oil is still a much-needed commodity worldwide. Resource-rich Africa and Central Asia are potential hotspots for geopolitical hegemons. Competition is fierce, leading to some new realities. Perhaps most notably: the United States no longer exclusively controls its energy future. More than ever before, the race for natural resources has an longer list of actors, with a playing field that extends to all seven continents and has even made its way to the Arctic Ocean.

With over 30 percent of the world’s extractive resources, Africa has garnered billions in international investment — leading some to think of this as a “resource curse.” Approximately 5,000 miles due north of Africa, 22 percent of the world’s undiscovered resources lie in the Arctic, with 84 percent located offshore. America’s Exclusive Economic Zone reaches 200 miles into the Arctic, overlapping with other competitor’s zones — most notably that of Russia.

2012 data from a BP world energy study reports that at current consumption rates, the world has 54.2 years of oil left, 63.6 years of natural gas, and 112 years of coal. As a result, access to natural resources will remain a top priority for the U.S., as well as its rivals. With resources dwindling, what opportunities does the U.S. have to explore alternative energy options? What is the coming impact of global natural resource depletion?

Join the World Affairs Council and Washington & Jefferson College in a discussion on America’s energy dilemma, and what it means for future generations.

Dr. Michael Klare is the director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies and a Five College professor at Hampshire College. He has written on U.S. defense policy, energy geopolitics, and international trade in numerous journals including Harper’s, The Nation, Current History, Scientific American, and Foreign Affairs. Dr. Klare is the author of five books, including Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America’s Growing Dependency on Imported Petroleum (2004), and his most recent book, The Race for What’s Left: The Global Scramble for the World’s Last Resources. Dr. Klare earned his B.A. and M.A. from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from the Graduate School of the Union Institute.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 7, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With special thanks to Washington & Jefferson College

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Roger Kubarych
Political Salon
Understanding the Global Economy: Financial Obstacles to Global Growth

Roger Kubarych
National Intelligence Officer for Economic Issues
U.S. National Intelligence Council, Office of the Director of National Intelligence

November 12, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

In 2008, the “Great Recession” contributed to what was already an unstable and insecure decade for many Americans. Two foreign wars and domestic political dissent coupled with economic hardship characterized the first decade of the 21st century, leaving some to speculate that American power is waning. In the meantime, a new international economic order has emerged, with countries like Brazil, Russia, India, and China vying for their place on the world stage. Economic powerhouses such as Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States are slipping as other economies seek to move up the economic ladder. While the U.S. still remains the world’s largest economy, Japan has been leapfrogged by China for second. The World Bank predicts in five years, both Brazil and India’s economies will have surpassed those of the U.K. and France.

With these shifts have come a myriad of unresolved economic issues. The European sovereign debt crisis has left many wondering what role Europe will have moving further into the 21st century. Austerity measures and threats of collapse have destabilized global markets. Latest U.S. Treasury data report that China and Japan hold over $2.25 trillion in U.S. debt, while the U.S. Census reports that lopsided U.S. imports from China topped $273 billion in 2012.

Will economic competition lead to global conflict? What country — or countries — will emerge as leaders in the next twenty years? Has the free flow of information changed the global economic game? Join the Council for a better understanding of how the global economy operates, and what obstacles lie in the way of global growth.

Roger Kubarych is the National Intelligence Officer for Economic Issues at the U.S. National Intelligence Council, part of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Before joining the NIC, he was the Henry Kaufman Adjunct Senior Fellow for International Economics and Finance at the Council on Foreign Relations. Previously, Mr. Kubarych was the Managing Member and Chief Investment Officer of Kaufman & Kubarych Advisors LLC, General Manager of Henry Kaufman & Co. Inc., and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the New York Stock Exchange. He spent 13 years at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, serving as Senior Vice President and Deputy Director of Research.

Registration
Member: $15 | Non-Member: $25

Food and beverages included. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 8, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

With special thanks to Bricolage and the Heinrich Böll Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dealing with the Bear: Managing U.S.-Russian Relations
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Dealing with the Bear: Managing U.S.-Russian Relations

Ambassador Steven Pifer
Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine
Senior Fellow and Director of the Arms Control Initiative at the Brookings Institution

November 15, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Perhaps no other country on earth is as uniquely geopolitically positioned as Russia. Along its eastern border lies superpower China. Buffering its “soft underbelly” are the Central Asian “Stans” — traditionally viewed as a Russian protectorate. To the west is Europe and NATO. The world’s largest country in terms of landmass, Russia has historically found itself in the middle of European, Central Asian, and East Asian affairs. However, none of these relationships came to define Russia in the last century as much as its relationship with the United States. As well-documented Cold War foes, the U.S. and Russia have long harbored a tumultuous relationship, with recent political clashes over involvement in Syria and missile defense systems in Eastern Europe. Human and civil rights violations — particularly at the hands of the Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime — remain a hotly contested flashpoint.

Yet, despite this historic divisiveness, cooperation has been born out of necessity. The Kremlin is working with Washington to implement the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) that was signed in April 2010. The two countries continue to discuss cyber security, missile defense, and strategic security measures leading toward a renewed arms control initiative. Russia has been an instrumental ISAF partner in Afghanistan, collaborating on drug-trafficking prevention and military capacity-building efforts. The U.S. and Russian militaries also work in daily tandem during counterterrorism and counterpiracy operations off the Horn of Africa.

Nonetheless, questions remain about the future. What role does a Putin-led Russia play in the geopolitical spectrum? How does a multilateral international order change Russia’s approach to global power? Will cooperation be at a premium moving into the future, or will old rivalries persist? Join the Council for an engaging discussion on the evolving state of one the most intriguing topics in international affairs.

Ambassador Steven Pifer is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute and director of the Brookings Arms Control Initiative. He is the former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine. Amb. Pifer worked in the foreign services for 25 years including serving as Special Assistant to the President, Senior Director for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia on the National Security Council and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs. His commentary has been featured on CNN, NPR, VOA and the BBC. Amb. Pifer has also written articles for the Washington Post, International Herald Tribune,and  Boston Globe. He received a B.A. from Stanford University in economics and has received multiple Superior and Meritorious awards from the U.S. State Department.

He co-authored the recently released book, The Opportunity: Next Steps in Reducing Nuclear Arms.

Registration
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 8, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

International Student Summit Cybersecurity: Global Warfare in the Fifth Domain
International Student Summit
Cybersecurity: Global Warfare in the Fifth Domain

December 7, 2012

9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. (EST)

Baldwin High School, 4653 Clairton Boulevard, Pittsburgh 15236 & Video Conference

Presented by the World Affairs Councils of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia 
In Partnership with Baldwin High School, AIU3, and MAGPI

Register Now!

In an interconnected world, cyber warfare poses one of the most serious challenges to economic and national security. Given the catastrophic impact that a cyber attack could have on a nation’s critical infrastructure, including wreaking havoc on military defense and financial systems, security analysts consider cyberspace to be the next domain in global warfare, after land, sea, air and space. 

This year’s summit will participate in a discussion as part of a Worldwide Cybersecurity Conferenceconvened in response to rising tension between China and some of its neighbors over access to resource-rich islands in the South China Sea. Small groups of students will represent actors within several key sectors including intelligence and national security, finance and banking, diplomacy, energy industries, essential government services, multinational corporations, and departments of state. Discussion materials will be sent in advance of the program.

Summit Resources
Please use the links below to download Summit resources:

Participation at Baldwin High School
Click here to register.

Participation via Video Conference
Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dr. Ann Lee
What Can the U.S. Learn from China?
A Video Conference Discussion for High School Students

Ann Lee
Adjunct Professor, New York University
Author of What the U.S. Can Learn From China

November 5, 2012

9:00 a.m. — 10:30 a.m. (EST)

Video Conference

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, AIU3, and Pine-Richland School District

Register Now!

What can students learn about China to become more globally competitive?

What do they need to know to collaborate and cooperate with their peers in China?

Ann Lee will make brief remarks on China’s current and projected economic and political roles in the global community. After her presentation, students will have the opportunity to ask her questions directly via video conference.

Ann Lee is an expert on U.S.-China relations, finance, and global economics. She attended the University of California-Berkeley, Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs, and Harvard Business School.

Her media appearances include: ABC, Bloomberg, CBS, CNN, CNBC,  Fox Business, MSNBC, and NPR.

Her op-eds have appeared in: American Banker, Businessweek, Financial Times, Forbes, Newsweek, New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal

A limited number of schools may participate.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Lessons from the Dragon: What the U.S. Can Do to Remain a Superpower
Global Intelligence Briefing
Lessons from the Dragon - What the U.S. can do to Remain a Superpower

Ann Lee
Adjunct Professor, New York University
Author of What the U.S. Can Learn From China

November 5, 2012

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Allegheny HYP Club, 619 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

As the world’s current largest exporter and third largest importer, China entered this year boasting the world’s second largest economy. Since 1991, China’s annual GDP growth rate has not dipped below seven percent. Since 2002, China has produced eight years of double digit economic growth. 

As a result of these trends, China is increasingly viewed as the United States’ main economic competitor, especially with the International Monetary Fund’s April 2011 prediction that China’s economy will surpass that of the U.S. as early as 2016. However, it is important to note that China is also a stakeholder in  U.S. economic health. Aside from being the largest holder of U.S. treasury securities, China’s economy is vital to the U.S. consumer market. International economic competition is healthy and necessary, as it promotes efficiency and innovation, but there is also much to be gained from cooperation.

What can Pittsburgh business leaders do to recognize and act on these trends? Join the World Affairs Council and Echo International for an assessment of how the U.S. can learn from China’s meteoric rise.

Ann Lee currently serves as an Adjunct Professor of Economics and Finance at New York University. She is an expert on U.S.-China relations, finance, and global economics. She has appeared on MSNBC, Bloomberg, ABC, CBS, CNN, CNBC, Fox Business, and NPR. Her op-eds have appeared in publications such as the New York Times, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, Businessweek, Forbes, and American Banker. She attended the University of California-Berkeley, Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs, and Harvard Business School.

Registration
World Affairs Council and HYP Club Members: $25 | Non-members of either organization: $35

Special Offer: Event plus book purchase — $40 for members | $50 for non-members

K-12 Teacher Registration
K-12 teachers will receive complimentary registration with support from the Grable Foundation. To register, teachers should email Amiena Mahsoob at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org with their name, school name, mailing address, and email address or call 412-281-7973.

A reception will be held prior to the event. Appetizers will be served. Cash bar.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 29, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

With special thanks to the Allegheny HYP Club

Echo International and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh are pleased to launch a new series of Global Intelligence Briefings. These events – which will be held on a quarterly basis – are tailored to the specific needs of Pittsburgh’s business community. They are designed to offer expert analysis of global economic trends as well as insights into the cultural and social elements of the international marketplace.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

2012 International Youth Forum: One Young World Themes
2012 International Youth Forum:
One Young World Themes

Video Conference Series for High School Students

December 19, 2012

November 2012 – May 2013

Video Conference

Over the course of the 2012-2013 school year, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh will hold a series of International Youth Forums focused on contemporary economic, political, and social issues affecting young people. Using the One Young World Summit in Pittsburgh as a starting point, each of the six sessions will focus on a different theme. Each Forum will be a 90-minute video conference with small groups of students participating from local and international sites. The Council will offer participating schools the option of joining one of two sessions offered on each topic and encourages schools to maintain a core cohort to continue the conversation over the course of the school year. Registered schools will commit to participating in one of the sessions offered for each topic. Please see the tentative schedule below for details.

Prior to each International Youth Forum, students will watch highlights from the One Young World Summit tailored to the Forum topic. Students will compare and contrast their initial ideas and impressions about the topics with those presented during the special speaker and plenary sessions. They will then conduct research on the topics to be discussed and prepare 3-5 minute remarks on selected topics. Each session will be led by an expert facilitator.

Each of the Youth Forums will drill down on one or two of the One Young World plenary or special session topics, as voted on by Youth Forum participants. Topics include: education, global business, nutrition and health, human rights, leadership, sustainable development, transparency and integrity, and sports and society. Students will define the issues addressed, discuss the topics with their peers at sites around the world, and have the opportunity to develop potential solutions. They will also be able to develop pledges focused on creating change around the One Young World topics.

The culminating event for the year will bring together all of the students from some 20 schools through the region and around the world to discuss their pledges and their changing perspectives on the topics.

Click here for the tentative schedule. Click here to download the One Young World Preparation Guide.

Limited space is available! Participants must register to participate.

For more information, please contact Amiena Mahsoob amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-281-7973.

Thanks to our partners: One Young World, AIU3 and MAGPI

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Public Policy Discussion & Luncheon: Beyond 2012 - A U.K. Perspective on the Global Economy
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Beyond 2012: A U.K. Perspective on the Global Economy

Danny Lopez
British Consul General in New York

October 29, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

By late 2008, the global economy was in free fall. As U.S. markets began to break under the pressure of volatile securities and an escalating mortgage crisis, a world-wide domino-effect soon followed. Global markets were feeling the strain, perhaps none so much as on the other side of the Atlantic. With markets intricately linked, the U.S. and European economic downturn ushered in the “Great Recession” as a global economic crisis. For the next four years, the modus operandi for most governments around the world — even the most stable ones — became a policy of fiscal containment.

Fast-forward to 2012, and the European sovereign debt crisis continues to make international headlines.German Chancellor Angela Merkel is the champion of austerity, but her position in Europe was weakened by the election of a new French President, socialist François Hollande, in April. Greece continues to remain a point of contention, as the “Troika” looks to slash budgets and reconcile Greece’s enormous debt burden. Yet with all of the discussion about mainland Europe, how is the U.S.’s closest regional ally handling its recovery from the worst economic slowdown in 80 years?

The stability of the euro zone — the U.K.’s largest export market — remains a priority for market analysts, government leaders, and policy makers. But other concerns linger, as rebounding from recent hits to the pound sterling and a struggling manufacting base have added to the long to-do list of the U.K.’s fragile recovery. What are the perspectives from across the Atlantic? Join the Council for a conversation on the U.K.’s view of the global economy, and what our neighbor across the pond is doing to mount a comeback.

Danny Lopez is the British Consul General in New York and responsible for increasing the U.K.’s foreign policy, national security, and economic activity in the United States. His office covers New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and part of Connecticut. He is on the Board of U.K. Trade and Investment, the overseas commercial arm of the British government. Mr. Lopez formerly worked as the Group Director for Business Support and Promotion for the Mayor of London’s London Development Agency (LDA). He began his career at Barclays Bank, working in many senior positions including Business Development Director in India. Mr. Lopez then joined U.K. Trade and Investment where he helped British businesses find success in international markets. Mr. Lopez has a B.A. in Economics and a Masters in International Economics and Finance from the University of Essex.

Costs
Council Members: $45 | Non-members: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 25, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Presidential Election Watch Party:
Presidential Election Watch Party:
2012 Foreign Policy Debate

October 22, 2012

Networking and informal discussion: 8:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Debate: 9:00 - 10:30 p.m.
Wrap-up: 10:30 - 11:00 p.m.

August Henry’s, 946 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

There is no denying that the last four years have made their mark: a recent Pew Research Center poll indicates that the “Great Recession” and the subsequent fragile economic recovery are American’s biggest concerns for the upcoming election. Both President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Governor Mitt Romney are going head-to-head over the economy in swing states such as Colorado, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

Just as it seemed as though putting Americans back to work was the only issue on the agenda, foreign policy became a hot topic. There is certainly much to talk about. Osama bin Laden is dead, but the world is not necessarily safer. On September 11, 2012, the U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three of his staff were murdered during an attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi. “Green on Blue” attacks in Afghanistan are souring public opinion about the conflict that has lasted over a decade. By 2014, almost all U.S. forces will be out of Afghanistan. Geopolitically, the Arab Awakening continues to evolve, as do concerns regarding the ongoing stability of North Africa and the Middle East. Iran’s pursuit of a nuclear weapon threatens to flip the balance of power in Central Asia and the Middle East, while Russian President Vladimir Putin is bringing Russia back to global prominence. Meanwhile, the civil war in Syria continues to claim thousands of lives while the international community remains divided on a course of action.

Many questions remain:

  • With the Obama administration’s so-called “Asia pivot,” who will dominate the “Pacific Century?
  • Will the 21st century be an “American Century,” as Gov. Romney suggests?
  • How will Gov. Romney’s foreign policy differ from that of President Obama’s?
  • What will the world’s reaction be to U.S. foreign policy moving forward?

There is no charge for this event, but registration is required. Cash bar.

Questions? Call 412-281-7970 or email welcome@worldpittsburgh.org.

With special thanks to our co-sponsors!

Fletcher Club of Pittsburgh

Georgetown University School of Foreign Service Alumni Club, Pittsburgh Chapter

SAIS Alumni Club, Pittsburgh Chapter

Urban League Young Professionals of Greater Pittsburgh

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Sweden¯s Role in Scandinavia and the World
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Sweden’s Role in Scandinavia and the World

Ambassador Jonas Hafström
Swedish Ambassador to the United States

October 26, 2012

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

Chatham University, 106 Woodland Road, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

As much of Europe struggles with the lingering impact of the global economic slowdown, Scandinavian countries — particularly Sweden — have remained economic stalwarts of stability. Despite a relatively low population — roughly 9.5 million — and high tax rates, Sweden has managed navigate the challenges that have characterized the most recent economic downturn: high unemployment, rising inflation, and increasing public debt.

There is more to Sweden than its stable economy. Historically a militarily neutral state, Sweden’s recent role as an international power broker has been garnering headlines. Sweden’s military engagement has included lasting security partnerships with alliances such as NATO and the Northern Defense Cooperation (NORDEFCO). Having signed the Partnership for Peace agreement in 1994, Sweden has offered its military capability to NATO in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Libya. Since 2002, Sweden has operated with ISAF in Afghanistan, conducting operations in the Mazar-e-Sharif region. Additionally, arms sales to Southeast Asian countries (such as Thailand) are gaining the attention of security analysts, as the Swedish footprint is expanding throughout the region.

With a plethora of natural resources, a stable economy and manufacturing base, and an active military that operates globally, Sweden’s role on the world stage is becoming increasingly prominent. What does this mean for the balance-of-power in Europe? In the world? What does the future hold for the U.S.-Swedish relationship? Join the Council for a conversation with one of Sweden’s most respected public servants, and learn more about Sweden’s growing role in the international order.

Ambassador Jonas Hafström is the Swedish Ambassador to the United States. Previously, he served as Ambassador to Thailand as well as Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar. After joining the foreign service in 1979, Amb. Hafström served as Press Secretary to the Minister of Justice. He then moved to the Embassy in Tehran where he served as the First Secretary. From 1998-99, he was a member of the Swedish Defense Council. During Carl Bildt’s tenure as Leader of the Opposition and the three years he spent as Prime Minister, Amb. Hafström acted as foreign policy advisor. Amb. Hafström was awarded the Jonas Weiss Memorial Award in 2005. Three years later he received the Seraphim Medal from His Majesty King Carl XIV Gustaf. Amb. Hafström received a LL.B. from the University of Lund and is a non-commissioned reserve Capitan of the Swedish Army.

Costs
The cost of this event is $20 per person. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 22, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

OYW Livestream
One Young World Livestream

October 19, 2012

Livestream

Click here to watch the  livestream today!

One Young World, a premier event for young leaders, is coming to Pittsburgh! Participate in One Young World by watching the livestream of the proceedings from the Convention Center with the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh on Friday, October 19th. One Young World includes Special Speaker Sessions with experienced global leaders from a variety of fields, as well as Plenary Sessions that provide delegates the opportunity to share ideas from their communities.

One Young World serves as a platform for leadership development and networking, giving young leaders a voice. It is modeled after the prestigious World Economic Forum, which is held annually in Davos, Switzerland. At One Young World, young people from around the world discuss and debate issues addressed daily by government, business, NGOs, and academia. Topics include education, food, global business, global health, human rights, leadership & governance, sports, sustainable development, transparency and integrity. The inaugural One Young World Summit was held in London in February 2010. There were 853 delegates from 114 countries at this first summit. In Zurich in September of 2011, there were 1,200 delegates from over 160 countries. The momentum continues with an expected 1,300 delegates from over 180 countries for the 2012 One Young World Summit in Pittsburgh.

Click here to view the tentative livestream schedule
Watch the livestream of all or some of the sessions!

Click here to download the One Young World Preparation Guide.

For more information, please contact Amiena Mahsoob amiena@worldpittsburgh.orgor 412-281-7973.

Thanks to our partners: One Young World, AIU3 and MAGPI

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Next Five Years: Perspectives on China
Off-the-Record Breakfast Briefing
The Next Five Years: Perspectives on China

Lois Dougan Tretiak
Former Senior Advisor China and Chief Representative Beijing and Shanghai
The Economist Group

October 12, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Over the past two decades, China’s economy has enjoyed remarkable economic growth, and the Chinese economy is currently the second largest in the world — behind that of the United States. Some observers believe that China’s economy will overtake the United States by 2030, if not before. Yet recent reports indicate that China’s growth rate is slowing, with market analysts and economists predicting an annual growth rate as low as 7.5 percent — China’s lowest since 1990.

Despite this economic slowdown, there is little doubt that China will continue to grow more rapidly than the West and that it will continue to flex its muscles on the world stage. In the past year, China has vetoed several UN Security Council proposals regarding Syria, stepped up its engagement in Africa, and become embroiled in a multinational territorial dispute in the South China Sea.

In light of the Obama administration’s “Asia pivot” what can — and should — we expect from China in the mid- to long-term? Moving forward, what will be some defining characteristics of the relationship between China — the world’s largest Communist country — and the United States? How will the next five years determine China’s role in the international order? Join us for an off-the-record briefing about current and future trends in the world’s fastest growing power through the lens of one of the Economist Group’s most veteran China watchers.

China's Economic Slowdown Felt By Its Young Generation
Click here to wach the recent PBS NewsHour video

Lois Dougan Tretiak was Vice President and Director China for The Economist Group as well as founder and head of its network for senior executives doing business with China, the Economist Corporate Network. Her tenure with the Economist Group spanned more than three decades, the last five years of which as Senior Advisor China. Ms. Tretiak also served as the Economist Group’s Chief Representative in Beijing and Shanghai, advising businesses on Chinese investment strategies. Ms. Tretiak directed and partially wrote, Joint Ventures in the Peoples' Republic of China (1985), and co-authored, Operating Joint Ventures in China (1993).

Ms. Tretiak graduated from the University of Pittsburgh. She also attended Yale University, the East-West Center in Honolulu, and the University of Hong Kong Chinese Language School.

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 8, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

WorldQuest 2013
9th Annual
WorldQuest International Trivia Competition

Hosted by WTAE Channel 4’s Sally Wiggin and Essential Pittsburgh 90.5 WESA’s Paul Guggenheimer

October 29, 2012

6:00 p.m.: Check in
6:30 p.m.: Let the games begin!

Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Q. Which of the following is the official language of Guyana?

  1. English
  2. Portuguese
  3. Spanish
  4. Dutch

Click here to play!

If you think you can answer this question, you might have what it takes to be a WorldQuest champion! Find out by competing in this year’s 9th Annual 2012 WorldQuest competition.

Join us for a fun evening of food, drinks, prizes, unique networking opportunities, and friendly competition. Show off your knowledge of the world and help support the work of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

The competition will again be held at the Cabaret Theater in Pittsburgh’s Cultural District. The event will feature teams of four to accommodate more teams at a cost-friendly rate. In addition to competing for prizes, participants will have an opportunity to enter a raffle to win exciting prizes! All proceeds for this event go to support the Council’s over 200 annual events reaching the region’s secondary schools and professional community.

Raffles and Prizes!
Enter our raffle for a chance to win one of two $750 Delta travel vouchers! Other great raffle prizes include a Pittsburgh Marathon basket, a Bayer basket and a signed Arsenal jersey. Tickets will be available for 1 for $5, 3 for $10 or an arm length for $20.

Start Studying Now!
Use this link for the 2011 WorldQuest questions and answers.

Not interested in competing? Why don’t you come and cheer on the competitors? Just like last year, you can watch WorldQuest from the “Cheering Section” and support a team of your choice.

  • Team of 4: $120
  • Single Competitor: $30 (Those registered as single competitors will be placed in teams of 4 on the day of the competition).
  • Cheering Section: $30

Dinner included in the ticket price. Cash bar.

When registering a team, please include the team name, identify the team captain, and include the names of the other team members. Pre-payment is required for all players and teams.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Thank you to our 2012 Sponsors!

Thank you to our 2012 Prize Donors!

With special thanks
to Arsenal Football Club.
 

WorldQuest 2012 Sponsorship and Donor Opportunities
We are looking for sponsors who will also field one or more teams. This year's sponsorship opportunities include:

Bronze: $500

  • One team of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage

Silver: $1,000

  • One team of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 2 to the “Cheering Section.”
  • Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.

Gold: $2,500

  • Two teams of 4 competitors
  • Table for organizational materials
  • Recognition in all event materials and signage
  • Admittance for 4 to the “Cheering Section.”
  • Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.
  • One Corporate Level membership to the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Please contact Dan Law, at 412-281-1259, or email dan@worldpittsburgh.org for more information.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The New Power Struggle in Central Asia
The New Power Struggle in Central Asia

Dr. Alexander Cooley
Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University
Author of Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia

October 4, 2012

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Hampton High School, 2284 Wyland Avenue, Allison Park, PA 15101 & Video Conference

The 19th century struggle between Russia and Great Britain over Central Asia was the original "Great Game." Over the past 25 years, a new geopolitical competition has emerged, pitting the United States against Russia and a resource-hungry China. All three countries are vying for influence in one of the most volatile regions of the world. At the same time, Central Asian governments have proven to be powerful forces in their own right, establishing local rules that serve to fend off foreign demands, while jockeying for positions of regional hegemony. With three of the world’s superpowers competing for influence, how will the region come to define geopolitics in the coming century?

Program participants will have the opportunity to hear from Dr. Cooley and ask him questions either in-person at Trinity High School or via video conference.                                                                    

Dr. Alexander Cooley is the Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College and an Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is also a Ph.D. Advisor in Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Cooley has authored several books, including Logics of Hierarchy: The Organization of Empires, States and Military Occupations; Base Politics: Democratic Change and the US Military Overseas; and ContractingStates: Sovereign Transfers in International Relations. His most recent book is Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest for Central Asia. Dr. Cooley has been the International Security Fellow of the Smith Richardson Foundation and an Open Society Fellow. He has published policy-related articles in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, Foreign Affairs, and Washington Quarterly.

There is no cost to attend this event. Please use the links below to register.

Participation at Hampton High School
Registration is closed.

Participation via Video Conference
Registration is closed.

Questions?
Contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7027 or by email at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

America¯s Place in the World:  Challenges Facing the Next President
America’s Place in the World:
Challenges Facing the Next President

Program Canceled

Dr. Charles Kupchan
Professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations
Author of No One’s World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn

September 13, 2012

9:15 – 10:30 a.m.

Pine-Richland High School, 700 Warrendale Rd., Gibsonia, PA 15044 & Video Conference

This event has been canceled. For information, please contact Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

The United States: a global leader or one of many? The rise of the developing world – including the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) – has shown that there is not just one path to global strength. Some believe that the ascendancy of the United States and the appeal of Western-style democracy are on the decline. But is that really the case? Dr. Kupchan will discuss how the “rise of the rest” can be addressed by the next administration – and also what challenges await.

For this event, students will have the opportunity to hear from Dr. Kupchan and ask him questions directly at Pine-Richland High School or via video conference.

Dr. Charles A. Kupchan is Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University. He is also the Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Kupchan was Director for European Affairs on the National Security Council during the first Clinton administration. Before joining the NSC, he worked in the U.S. Department of State on the Policy Planning Staff. Prior to government service, he was an Assistant Professor of Politics at Princeton University. Dr. Kupchan is the author of multiple books, including No One’s World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn (2012), How Enemies Become Friends: The Sources of Stable Peace (2010), The End of the America Era: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Geopolitics of the Twenty-first Century (2002), and numerous articles on international and strategic affairs. Dr. Kupchan received a B.A. from Harvard University and M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees from Oxford University.

There is no cost to attend this event. Please use the links below to register.

This event has been canceled. For information, please contact Amiena Mahsoob at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Policy and Heritage: A Look at U.S.-Latin American Relations and Latino Culture in Pittsburgh
Policy and Heritage:
A Look at U.S.-Latin American Relations and Culture in Pittsburgh

Event Postponed

October 31, 2012

9:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

North Allegheny Intermediate High School, 350 Cumberland Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15237

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Marissa Germain at 412-281-7048.

A Regional Seminar offered in partnership with North Allegheny Intermediate High School, The Hispanic Employment Program Committee of the Federal Executive Board (OPM), and the Office of Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanics account for more than half of the United States’ population growth over the past 10 years, while Latin America is home to around 600 million people. The U.S. and Latin American governments collaborate on issues including trade and investment, military alliances, energy, the war on drugs, and immigration. Despite this, many U.S. students are unfamiliar with the countries, cultures, and politics of our neighbors to the south.

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, this regional seminar will provide participants with an opportunity to learn about Latin America from a panel of experts. Students will visit small breakout groups to discuss culture, politics, economics, language, and much more with prominent members of Pittsburgh’s Hispanic community.

Check-in begins at 9:15 a.m. and our program concludes at 12:50 p.m.

*Several breakout sessions will be made available in Spanish for mid-upper level Spanish students.

There is no charge for this Regional Seminar. Confirmation details will be sent upon registration.

Please register by October 21, 2012.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Marissa Germain at 412-281-7048.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

World Affairs Institute 2012
42nd World Affairs Institute for Student Leaders
Understanding the Global Economic Meltdown: What Does This Crisis Mean for You?

November 13, 2012

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Senator John Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15222

What is the objective of the Institute?
The Institute engages high school student leaders in a discussion of key issues in international affairs so that they can understand and think critically about their world.

Who can attend the Institute?
High school students are selected by local Rotary Clubs (Districts 6650, 7280, 7300, and 7330) in cooperation with schools. Each Rotary Club determines the number of scholarships available.

How many student delegates will attend?
Approximately 350 high school juniors and seniors.

How is the conference structured?
Through panel presentations and small breakout sessions, experts will discuss key issues with the student delegates. Each student will receive a comprehensive background paper prior to the Institute.

Who pays for the scholarships?
Each Rotary Club pays for the number of scholarships it is sponsoring.  The fee of $75 for each delegate will cover the cost of registration, educational materials, all conference sessions, lunch, and refreshments.

Tentative Institute Schedule

  9:00 a.m.     Registration
  9:30 a.m.     Welcome and Introduction
  9:45 a.m.     Keynote Speaker or Panel w/ Q&A
11:30 a.m.    
Panel DiscussionInstitute Luncheon
12:30 p.m.    
Institute Luncheon
  1:50 p.m.     Discussion Group Session
  3:30 p.m.     Discussion Group De-Briefing
  4:00 p.m.     Adjournment

Click here to download the 2012 WAI Background Paper.

Understanding the Global Economic Meltdown: What Does This Crisis Mean for You?

It is almost impossible to read a magazine or turn on the news today without hearing reference to the global economic crisis. Although constantly bombarded with updates about the U.S. recession and the euro crisis, stimulus packages and austerity measures, mortgages and bailouts, many people do not understand the implications of the current situation. Given the many factors and a myriad of actors that make up this issue, it is challenging to comprehend the nuances of the global economy. Key questions include:

What are the policy implications of a weak global economy?

How are national and local economies as well as labor markets affected by trade and globalization?

Why should Americans care what happens to the euro?

What role does the United States play on the international financial stage, particularly in organizations such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund?

What would happen if the U.S. ceased to be an active player in global economic issues?

What do the answers to these questions mean for today’s high school students?

As the global economic situation continues to evolve, the 2012 World Affairs Institute will provide participants with background on the causes leading up to – and contributing to – the global economic slowdown. Additionally, the Institute will offer insights to help students comprehend the current situation as well as understand policies implemented around the world to revive stagnant economies.

In order to prepare for the Institute, participants will receive updated online resources in addition to a comprehensive briefing paper on the topic. The online resources can be found by visiting www.WAIpittsburgh.wordpress.com.

Click here to download the 2012 Institute brochure.

Thoughts on the Topic

“Young people were innocent bystanders in the global financial crisis, but they may well end up
paying the heaviest price for the policy mistakes that have led us to where we are today.”

-Nemat Shafik
Deputy Managing Director, IMF

"The ’08 recession, which was a credit bubble that manifested itself through primarily the real estate
market, that was a serious stress....This is much more serious.”

-Dan Akerson
CEO, General Motors

“We must retool our nation to prepare for the challenge we already face to maintain our
position in the global economy. And this much is certain: America will not have national security without economic security.”

-Senator John Kerry

“I think we understood that [the economic crisis] was bad, but we didn’t know how bad it was.”

-President Barack Obama

Thoughts on the Institute

“Thank you for providing such an informative experience that has broadened my perspective of the world!”

“The panel presentations were extremely substantive, and the speakers were very well-versed in their areas of expertise. Their insight was invaluable, and was not something I could have experienced anywhere else.”

This year’s World Affairs Institute marks the 42nd year of collaboration between the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Rotary International.

About Rotary International
Rotary is a worldwide organization of more than 1.2 million business, professional, and community leaders. The mission of Rotary International is to provide service to others, promote integrity, and advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders. There are 34,000 Rotary clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas. Clubs are non-partisan, non-denominational, and open to all cultures, races, and creeds. As signified by the motto, “Service Above Self,” Rotary’s main objective is service — in the community, in the workplace, and throughout the world.


About the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to promoting a deeper understanding of key contemporary international issues throughout Western Pennsylvania. Established in 1931, the Council has a special focus on secondary schools throughout the region, and works to give students and teachers a more nuanced understanding of the global issues of our time. The Council also is committed to informing opinion leaders and decision-makers about developments around the world as they unfold – and to educating them about the relevance of such developments to the region. 

Questions?
For more information, please contact Christina Unger by phone at (412) 281-7027 or by email christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

 

Innovation, Extremism, and Technology
Innovation, Technology, and Extremism

Scott Carpenter
Deputy Director
Google Ideas

September 28, 2012

Noon - 1:00 p.m.

Video Conference

The online registration is closed. If you have questions, please contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at amiena@worldaffairspittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7973.

In a hyper-connected world, technology is not just a ubiquitous part of daily life. It also serves as a driver of social innovation in our globalized economy and a conduit for violent extremism. During this discussion with Scott Carpenter, students will have the opportunity to discuss the work of Google’s “think-do” tank, explore careers in technology, and see how having knowledge of global issues can help them in their chosen field.

Scott Carpenteris deputy director of Google Ideas, Google's "think/do" tank, where he is responsible for driving its illicit networks portfolio as well as contributing to its strategy in three other key areas: confronting violent extremism, expanding internet access in closed societies and utilizing technology to drive civic innovation. Prior to joining Google, Scott founded and directed Project Fikra as the Keston Family Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, where he remains an adjunct fellow.  Previously, Scott served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of Near East Affairs where he helped conceive and implement the Middle East Partnership Initiative before being named Coordinator for the Broader Middle East and North Africa Initiative.  His other roles in government include director of governance for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Human Rights and Democracy.  He founded and co-directed the International Republican Institute’s Europe office before that. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

The online registration is closed. If you have questions, please contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at amiena@worldaffairspittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7973.

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Science and Technology Academy.

Special thanks to MAGPI and AIU3.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Central Asia and the New Great Game:  Lessons for a Multipolar World
Political Salon
Central Asia and the New Great Game: Lessons for a Multipolar World

Dr. Alexander Cooley
Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University
Author of Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest in Central Asia

October 3, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Awesome Books, 929 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

The 19th century struggle between Russia and Great Britain over Central Asia was the original "Great Game." Over the course of the past quarter century, a new geopolitical competition has emerged, pitting the United States against Russia and a resource-hungry China. All three countries are vying for influence in one of the most volatile regions of the world. During the same period, Central Asian governments have proven to be powerful forces in their own right, establishing local rules that serve to fend off foreign demands, while jockeying for positions of regional hegemony.

Central Asia is no longer the chessboard for a bipolar world. Instead, the struggle for power in the region reflects a new international order — one that is both multipolar and fraught with competing eastern and western influence. With initiatives like the U.S.-backed “New Silk Road” and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, which is being promoted by China and Russia, Central Asia finds itself in familiar territory — the intersection of a great game with local rules. How has increased geopolitical engagement by the U.S., Russia, and China affected the governments and peoples of Central Asia? With three of the world’s largest superpowers competing for influence, how will the region come to define geopolitics in the coming century? Join the Council for a discussion on the future global balance of power, and where the United States and its geopolitical rivals fit within the framework.

Click here to watch a Foreign Affairs video of Dr. Alex Cooley talking about the new "Great Game" in Central Asia.

Click here to read the Harper's Magazine article "Great Games, Local Rules: Six Questions for Alex Cooley"

Click here to read the Cairo Review of Global Affairs article "Great Games, Local Rules"

Dr. Alexander Cooley is a Tow Professor of Political Science at Barnard College and  an Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is also a Ph.D. Advisor in Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Cooley has authored several books, including Logics of Hierarchy: The Organization of Empires, States and Military Occupations; Base Politics: Democratic Change and the US Military Overseas; and Contracting States: Sovereign Transfers in International Relations. His most recent book is Great Games, Local Rules: The New Great Power Contest for Central Asia. Dr. Cooley has been International Security Fellow of the Smith Richardson Foundation and an Open Society Fellow. He has published policy-related articles in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, Foreign Affairs, and Washington Quarterly.

Costs
$15 is the price of admission and includes:  drinks, appetizers, networking, and a great discussion.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 26, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

With thanks to Awesome Books and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Implications of the Arab Awakening on U.S. Foreign Policy
Breakfast Briefing
The Implications of the Arab Awakening on U.S. Foreign Policy

J. Scott Carpenter
Adjunct Fellow, Washington Institute for Near East Policy
Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State
Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, U.S. Department of State

September 28, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Across the Middle East and Northern Africa, there is instability. Despite the overthrow of corrupt governments in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and Yemen, the future of the Arab world remains unclear. Factor in the increasingly critical situation in Syria, and some of the most entrenched regimes of the last half-century have either been toppled or engaged in a dire struggle to remain in power. Take a step back and there is even more to the equation: a fledgling government is struggling to control Iraq, recent negotiations between the West and Iran have seen limited progress, and the Israelis have a civil war to their north and existential threats emanating from the east.

The Middle East has always been high among U.S. foreign policy priorities, but since late 2010, developments throughout the region have continued to change the political landscape, while leaving many to speculate on the U.S. reaction. Some have argued that the United States has had a ‘hands off’ policy, characterized by President Barack Obama’s approach to intervention in Libya — notably termed as “leading from behind.” Others speculate that the U.S. is now caught in a geopolitical catch-22, navigating a juxtaposition of past support of regional strongmen with current calls for democratic transition and reform. What do these developments mean for U.S. foreign policy? Join the Council and the American Middle East Institute for a conversation on the current state of U.S. policy amidst sweeping changes throughout one of the most volatile regions on the globe.

J. Scott Carpenter founded and directed Project Fikra as the Keston Family Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, where he currently serves as an adjunct fellow. Previously, Mr. Carpenter served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs from 2004 to 2007, and as Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Human Rights and Democracy. His other roles in government include Director of Governance for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq. Before joining the State Department, Mr. Carpenter worked with the International Republican Institute (IRI), a nonprofit organization based in Washington, D.C. Mr. Carpenter is currently Deputy Director of Google Ideas – Google's "think/do" tank – where he is responsible for driving its illicit networks portfolio. He holds an M.A. in economics and European studies from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and a B.A. from Hope College. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. 

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 24, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Hosted in partnership with the American Middle East Institute.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The ¯American Century¯ or Retrenchment? Challenges Facing the Next President
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The "American Century" or Retrenchment?
Challenges Facing the Next President

Dr. Charles A. Kupchan
Professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations
Author of No One’s World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn

September 13, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

In February 1941, Life publisher Henry Luce first wrote of the “American Century.” After World War II,  the United States’ only geopolitical rival was the Soviet Union. After the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, the world had only one reigning hegemon, and U.S. leadership heralded the collapse of the Soviet Union as the final, crowning achievement of the West and democracy movements worldwide.

Fast forward two decades, and the international environment looks markedly different. Authoritarian regimes in the Middle East have been put on notice by their own populations, while China and India have risen as leviathans full of economic potential. The lagging global recession has stifled confidence in Western markets and with it the full faith and confidence of the United States’ position as the world’s preeminent power broker. The BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and others are rising to prominence in a world increasingly undetermined by Western preferences. What do these trends mean for the next American President? How will he handle the global challenges of the 21st century and the multipolar world which now exists? Join the Council in the run-up to the 2012 presidential election with a discussion about America’s changing role on the global stage and the shifting international order.

Click here to see C-SPAN's Book TV for Dr. Kupchan's talk on his latest book, "No One's World: the West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn."

Click here to read a Washington Post review of Dr. Kupchan's latest book.

Dr. Charles A. Kupchan is Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University. He is also the Whitney H. Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Kupchan was Director for European Affairs on the National Security Council during the first Clinton administration. Before joining the NSC, he worked in the U.S. Department of State on the Policy Planning Staff. Prior to government service, he was an Assistant Professor of Politics at Princeton University. Dr. Kupchan is the author of multiple books, including No One’s World: The West, the Rising Rest, and the Coming Global Turn (2012), How Enemies Become Friends: The Sources of Stable Peace (2010), The End of the America Era: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Geopolitics of the Twenty-first Century (2002), and numerous articles on international and strategic affairs. Dr. Kupchan received a B.A. from Harvard University and M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees from OxfordUniversity. 

Costs
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $65 | Table of eight (8): $360

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.  

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 6, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Cloud and the Crowd:  Using Technology to Map, Expose, and Disrupt Illicit Networks
Political Salon
The Cloud and the Crowd:
Using Technology to Map, Expose, and Disrupt Illicit Networks

Scott Carpenter
Deputy Director, Google Ideas

September 27, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

For the over 900 million users that access Facebook on a regular basis, the term “social network” has perhaps evolved from the passing fancy of collegiate undergrads to a technological revolution. In the past seven years, social media outlets have exploded in the proverbial ‘cloud,’ only to be matched by other technological breakthroughs. Along with Facebook, MySpace, YouTube, and Twitter have come Blackberries, iPhones, Droids, and tablets — not to mention the vast array of other portable wireless devices. Personal satellite links and global positioning systems are no longer solely in the realm of the elite; they can now fit in anyone’s pocket. Technology has made the world smaller. Farmers in Vietnam can now track weather patterns in Southeast Asia with a smartphone. Entrepreneurs can reach consumers through online markets. High-resolution video conferencing connects service providers in the United States with manufacturing bases in China and Latin America. In short, accessibility has changed the game.

However, there is a dark side to the availability of these new technologies. Illicit networks and those who operate them are often among the first to take advantage of newly developed tools — thereby, allowing illegal traffickers to simultaneously monitor law enforcement, while developing and operating their networks. Extremist groups use social media and other communication outlets to spread messages of intolerance and violence. Moreover, virtually every individual ’online’ is now subject to the arbitrary whims of hackers, who can access vital organizational information and personal data. Groups such as WikiLeaks and Anonymous have demonstrated that even the most well-resourced organizations — such as the United States government — are not beyond reach. Out of these trends, has a new game of cat and mouse emerged, only with different actors? Join the Council for insight into how technology can disrupt illicit networks and protect those most vulnerable to harm.

Scott Carpenter is Deputy Director of Google Ideas, Google's "think/do" tank. He is responsible for driving its illicit networks portfolio and contributes to its strategy in three other key areas: confronting violent extremism, expanding internet access in closed societies, and using technology to drive civic innovation. Before joining Google, Mr. Carpenter founded and directed Project Fikra as the Keston Family Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Previously, Mr. Carpenter served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of Near East Affairs where he helped conceive and implement the Middle East Partnership Initiative before being named Coordinator for the Broader Middle East and North Africa Initiative. His other roles in government include Director of Governance for the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Human Rights and Democracy. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.  

Costs
World Affairs Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25

Food and beverages included. Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 24, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

With special thanks to Bricolage Production Company and the Heinrich Böll Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

The State of al-Qa¯ida and the Future of Afghanistan
In the Hot Seat
Dr. Seth Jones: The State of al-Qa’ida and the Future of Afghanistan

Dr. Seth Jones
Associate Director
International Security and Defense Policy Center
RAND Corporation, Washington, D.C.

September 19, 2012

10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

Video Conference

Today’s high school students were toddlers when two planes struck the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. More than a decade later, Al-Qa’ida and the threat of global terrorism remain high on the list of American security concerns. This program will give students the opportunity to engage Dr. Seth Jones in a frank conversation about counterinsurgency and counterterrorism, al-Qa'ida, Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

Students at Cornell High School will host a talk-show style discussion with RAND’s Seth Jones. Dr. Steven E. Sokol, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, will assist students in framing questions. Up to five interactive video conference sites can participate and submit questions ahead of the program. Others can watch the program unfold via live stream. All participants can interact via Twitter.

Seth G. Jones is Associate Director of the International Security and Defense Policy Centerat the RAND Corporation. He served in several positions at U.S. Special Operations Command, including as senior advisor to the commanding general for U.S. Special Operations Forces in Afghanistan. Dr. Jones specializes in counterinsurgency and counterterrorism, with a particular focus on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and al-Qa'ida. He is the author of “Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of al-Qa'ida after 9/11” (W. W. Norton, 2012), which was featured on Charlie Rose, CNN, Fox News, the News Hour with Jim Lehrer, the BBC, and was an Editor’s Choice recipient for the New York Times Book Review. He also authored, “In the Graveyard of Empires: America's War in Afghanistan” (W. W. Norton, 2010). He has published articles in Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy, as well as in such newspapers and magazines as the New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Jones received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Registration for this event is closed. For more information, contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Cornell High School.

Special thanks to: MAGPI

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Looking Beyond the Lady:  The Realities of Reform in Myanmar
Political Salon
Looking Beyond the Lady: The Realities of Reform in Myanmar

Michelle Fanzo
Project Leader, World Policy Institute
Founder and President, Four Corners Consulting

September 18, 2012

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Bar Marco, 2216 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

In December 2011, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton traveled to Myanmar to encourage progress toward democratization. Her trip came on the heels of the Obama administration's "Asia pivot" and was the most senior U.S. official visit since generals seized power in 1962 and largely cut off the country to outside world. The situation in Myanmar ceded attention to the "Arab Awakening" and the collapse of authoritarian regimes in the Middle East, but Myanmar is now back in the news. After nearly two decades under house arrest, opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, won a seat in the Burmese parliament earlier this year. Her release and quick return to prominence has been symbolic of the military junta’s long-overdue response to steady international pressure for democratic reform.

Is there room for optimism based on these trends? Some contend that Myanmar’s military rulers have shown specious signs of reform in the past while never following through. Others see entrenched poverty and lack of infrastructure as significant obstacles in Myanmar’s path toward development. Join the Council for a discussion on Myanmar’s tenuous future, through the lens of a former journalist and UN negotiator who has spent significant time in Myanmar. 

Michelle Fanzo, a Project Leader at the World Policy Institute, has worked in Afghanistan, Germany, Kenya, Malawi, and Myanmar. She is the founder of Four Corners Consulting, which helps mission-based organizations and innovative companies to adapt and grow in a changing global environment. Ms. Fanzo directed a women’s empowerment NGO in Afghanistan and worked for the UN, including in the Office of the Secretary-General under Kofi Annan. Her responsibilities focused on peacekeeping, development and humanitarian affairs, focusing on strategic planning, policy, and communications. While at the UN, she helped negotiate with the government of Myanmar to take action on a national HIV/AIDS crisis, just one of many critical areas identified in the year she spent assessing the humanitarian situation in that country. Ms. Fanzo recently returned from a month-long fact-finding mission to Myanmar.

Ms. Fanzo has over nine years of experience in journalism, writing for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Observer, Reuters, and other media outlets. She has a Master’s degree in International Affairs and Public Administration from the University of Pittsburgh and was the President and Founder of the Pittsburgh Urban Magnet Project.

Costs
There is no charge for World Affairs Council Members | $15 for non-members

Cash bar. Drink specials! Appetizers will be served.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 14, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

With special thanks to Bar Marco and the Heinrich Böll Foundation

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

KQV Global Press Conference: Doran
KQV Global Press Conference
Is Syria Really that Important?

November 23, 2013

7:00 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Michael Doran, Senior Fellow, Saban Center for Middle East Politics, Brookings Institution. He will discuss "Is Syria Really that Important?" with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 45,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

The State of al-Qa¯ida on the Eve of the U.S. Elections
Breakfast Briefing
The State of al-Qa’ida on the Eve of the U.S. Elections

Dr. Seth Jones
Associate Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center
RAND Corporation, Washington, D.C.
Author, Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of al-Qai’da after 9/11

September 19, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant St., Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

By the time the world recovered from the collective shock of the September 11 attacks, al-Qa’ida had become a household name. By late 2001, U.S. forces in Afghanistan chased many members of the extremist group into hiding throughout the mountainous border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan. However, the organization has managed to continue on despite increased pressure from the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) over the course of the last decade. In May 2011, al-Qa’ida suffered a potentially existential blow when Osama bin Laden — the mastermind of the September 11 attacks — was killed  by Navy SEAL Team Six during a raid on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Now under the leadership of Ayman al-Zawahiri, al-Qai’da remains the focus of many security analysts and experts. However, with the U.S. presidential elections around the corner, foreign policy and national defense appear to have taken a back seat to domestic issues such as unemployment and the fragile economic recovery. What does the future hold for al-Qa’ida? How will the next U.S. president address this threat? Join the Council for an assessment on the state of one of the most infamous terrorist organizations in recent history.

The Life and Death of al-Qaida's 'General Manager'  - click here to view Seth Jones' take on PBS NewsHour.

Click here to read a New York Times review of Seth Jones' book "Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of Al-Qa'ida Since 9/11."

Seth G. Jones is a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation. He served in several positions at U.S. Special Operations Command, including as senior advisor to the commanding general for U.S. Special Operations Forces in Afghanistan. Dr. Jones specializes in counterinsurgency and counterterrorism, with a particular focus on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and al-Qa'ida. He is the author of “Hunting in the Shadows: The Pursuit of al-Qa'ida after 9/11” (W. W. Norton, 2012), which was featured on Charlie Rose, CNN, Fox News, the News Hour with Jim Lehrer, the BBC, and was an Editor’s Choice recipient for the New York Times Book Review. He also authored, “In the Graveyard of Empires: America's War in Afghanistan” (W. W. Norton, 2010). He has published articles in Foreign Affairs and Foreign Policy, as well as in such newspapers and magazines as the New York Times, Newsweek, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Jones received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-members: $25

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 14, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Reza Aslan, Professor of Creative Writing at UC-Riverside; Author of Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth
KQV Global Press Conference
Zealot and the Politics of 1st Century Palestine

September 7, 2013

7:00 a.m.

This half-hour radio program will feature Reza Aslan, Professor of Creative Writing at UC-Riverside; Author of Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. He will discuss “Zealot and the Politics of 1st Century Palestine" with host Council President, Dr. Steven E. Sokol.

Pittsburgh KQV Global Press Conference is the Council's weekly radio show, airing on KQV News Radio AM 1410 on Saturdays at 7:00 a.m. and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Times may vary from week to week, so please check the KQV website for updates.

The half-hour program reaches more than 45,000 listeners per week. Program topics and/or times are subject to change.

 

Winning in the Global Economy
Global Innovation Forum
Winning in the Global Economy Policy
Solutions to Support Pittsburgh’s Leading Innovators

July 20, 2012

8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Reed Smith Centre, 225 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

The Global Innovation Forum of the National Foreign Trade Council Foundation is organizing a half-­day workshop and conference focused on innovation policymaking and its role in supporting Pittsburgh innovators. This event is produced in partnership with Reed Smith LLP, the Pittsburgh Technology Council, the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, Catalyst Connection and the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development.

The conference will engage business and community leaders from Pittsburgh with policymakers and trade experts from Washington, DC in a dialogue about how to create an optimal environment to enable success in the global economy for Pittsburgh’s leading innovators. The conference is meant to elicit advice and input from senior business leaders to help guide innovation and trade policy priorities. President Obama’s Administration has announced an ambitious goal of doubling U.S. exports in a short time frame and of using global markets to support new, high-­‐wage jobs at home: what do Pittsburgh’s innovators need to win in the global economy?

  • 8:30 a.m.: Registration and continental breakfast
  • 9:00 a.m: Welcome remarks goals for the meeting
    Bill Reinsch, President, National Foreign Trade Council
  • 9:10 a.m.: Panel: The Pittsburgh Globalization Story
    Panelists include local business leaders and experts to provide a landscape narrative of the Pittsburgh innovation economy, its history, success stories and opportunities moving forward.
  • 10:15 a.m.: Break
  • 10:30 a.m.: Panel: Creating Value in Global Supply Chains
    Panelists include major multinational global affairs executives from Washington, DC on value of global supply chain and opportunities for Pittsburgh to compete and win global demand, investment and talent to remain innovation leader in the 21st Century.
  • 11:40 a.m.: Break
  • Noon: Luncheon Discussion with Ambassador Ron Kirk, United States Trade Representative and
    An interactive discussion led by Dr. Steven E. Sokol, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

    Ambassador Ron Kirk, US Trade Representative, discusses the role of foreign trade, investment flows and innovation in the success of the American economy.
  • 1:00 p.m.: Adjournment

Participation in the conference is private, by invitation only and is free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors.

Please RSVP to Vivian Myers at vmyers@nftc.org to attend.

This conference is part of a national innovation initiative made possible by GE Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Anne C. Richards
Breakfast Briefing
America’s Responsibility to Refugees: In the U.S. and Around the World

Anne C. Richard
Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration
U.S. Department of State

June 29, 2012

8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” So goes the New Colossus sonnet embossed on the Statue of Liberty, welcoming new immigrants to the United States. But does America adhere to this principle? Despite the ebb and flow of immigration policy and its relative openness to political and religious refugees, how does the United States treat refugees at home and abroad in the 21st century?

Throughout the world, millions of people continue to be uprooted and displaced from their homes due to violent conflict. According to the U.N. Refugee Agency, nearly 30 percent (a total of 10.6 million people) of the world’s refugees are located in Asia and the Pacific. Millions more have been displaced due to violence and political unrest in the Middle East and North Africa; roughly 4.5 million in North and South America. The list continues. But how can the United States address the complex challenges represented by this global issue? Join Assistant Secretary of State, Anne C. Richard, in a conversation about new developments and initiatives for humanitarian aid domestically and internationally, and what resources are available for those in need.    

Anne C. Richard was appointed as the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration in April 2012. Previously, she was the Vice President of Government Relations and Advocacy for the International Rescue Committee (IRC). She was also a non-resident Fellow of the Center for Transatlantic Relations at the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies and a board member of the Henry L. Stimson Center.Ms. Richard has also served as Director of the Secretary’s Office of Resources, Plans and Policy at the State Department, as well as Deputy Chief Financial Officer of the Peace Corps. Earlier, she served as a Senior Advisor in the Deputy Secretary’s Office of Policy and Resources at the State Department. She holds a B.S. from Georgetown University and an M.A. from the University of Chicago.

Cost
There is a $20 charge for this event.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after June 24, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

With special thanks to Vibrant Pittsburgh

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Battle Between Democracy and Dictatorship:  Are Dictators Getting Smarter?
Political Salon
The Battle Between Democracy and Dictatorship: Are Dictators Getting Smarter?

William J. Dobson
Politics and Foreign Affairs Editor, Slate Magazine
Author, The Dictator’s Learning Curve: Inside the Global Battle for Democracy

July 17, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bar Marco, 2216 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Waiting list

This event is oversubscribed, and we have started a waiting list.

There are often cancellations and seats open up. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, please call 412-281-7970 or click here to send an email.

Please provide your best contact information, so that in the event that a spot does become available, we can get hold of you. We will try the best contact method you provide, but to be fair to others on the waiting list, we can only hold your spot for a short time before offering the spot to the next person on the list.

As the Arab Spring unfolded during 2011, new attention was brought to the changing face of authoritarian rule. Strongmen like former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi once dominated the political landscape in the Middle East and North Africa — but now have joined a cache of toppled regime leaders. Yet autocratic leaders such as Venezuelan President Hugo Chaves, Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, and Russian President Vladimir Putin remain in relative control — having adapted their style of rule to avoid ceding absolute power.

How do dictators’ behaviors change over time? How is their grip on power executed differently now than in the past? Are dictators and autocrats getting smarter? William Dobson’s much-anticipated new book, The Dictator’s Learning Curve: Inside the Global Battle for Democracy, proposes that democracy — albeit of an illegitimate variety — has become the new standard in authoritarian rulers’ playbook for retaining power. As recent years have seen a host of rigged elections and inadequate polling practices, Mr. Dobson’s book is set against a backdrop of real-world vignettes, ranging from South America to Southeast Asia. At a moment in history when toppled dictators are being replaced with fledgling democracies, join us for a discussion about how some authoritarian regimes have constructed a new place for themselves in the international order.

Click here to listen to William J. Dobson's recent interview with Jian Ghomeshi on Q!

William J. Dobson is the Politics and Foreign Affairs Editor for Slate Magazine. Previously, he served as the managing editor of Foreign Policy magazine. Earlier in his career, Mr. Dobson served as Senior Editor for Asia for Newsweek International and as Associate Editor at Foreign Affairs. His international politics articles and op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, and Foreign Policy. He has provided commentary and analysis on international politics for ABC, CNN, CBS, MSNBC, and NPR. He holds a law degree from Harvard Law School and a Masters degree in East Asian Studies from Harvard University. He received his bachelor's degree, summa cum laude, from Middlebury College.

Costs
There is no charge for World Affairs Council Members | Non-Members: $15

Cash bar. Drink Specials! Appetizers will be served.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after July 12, 2012 will be charged.

With special thanks to

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Thomas Sanderson, Co-Director and Senior Fellow, CSIS
Political Salon
China: Concerns and Opportunities in the Middle Kingdom

Thomas M. Sanderson
Co-Director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats Project, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

June 28, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

It is no mystery that China’s defense spending has increased dramatically in recent decades, paralleling the country’s meteoric economic rise. However, the full extent of China’s economic prospects and military muscle — as well as the country’s tendency toward or away from international cooperation — is not widely understood.

Historically, Chinese leadership has made a virtue of eschewing international intervention and conflict, often criticizing the West for engaging in the affairs of other states. But recent events — including conflict in the South China Sea between the Chinese and Philippine navies, controversial forward operating outposts in the Indian Ocean, as well as Chinese economic influence within Africa — raise questions over China’s ostensible reluctance toward interventionist policy. By creating such a formidable military and expanding its influence in the developing world, the ultimate strategy and stance of Chinese foreign policy remains speculative from the Western perspective. Join foreign policy analyst Thomas Sanderson for a engaging discussion regarding the opportunities and challenges posed by China’s development.

Thomas Sanderson is Co-Director and Senior Fellow in the CSIS Transnational Threats Project. Specializing in terrorism, transnational crime, Central Asia, global trends, and intelligence issues. He has conducted field work in more than 60 countries. Mr. Sanderson has over 13 years of counterterrorism experience, focusing on extremists, insurgents, foreign intelligence, nongovernmental organizations, and academics. Sanderson has published in The Economist, the New York Times, Washington Post, West Point CTC Sentinel, and the Harvard Asia Pacific Review. Mr. Sanderson holds a B.A. from Wheaton College in Massachusetts and an MALD in law and diplomacy Tufts University’s Fletcher School.

Costs
World Affairs Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25

Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after June 23, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Dan Law at 412-281-1259.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Continuity or Change?  Obama¯s Foreign Policy Team and the Redefinition of American Power
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Continuity or Change?
Obama’s Foreign Policy Team and the Redefinition of American Power

James Mann
Author-in-Residence
Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies
Author of The Obamians: The Struggle Inside the White House to Redefine American Power

July 10, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

Following his election in 2008, President Obama’s choices in cabinet members and advisors were seen as an attempt to provide a stark redefinition of U.S. foreign policy. Coming into office, the President inherited two wars and a global recession — and brought with him a young, new, and relatively unknown inner circle of policy advisors.

Best-selling author James Mann has offered an analysis of President Obama’s foreign policy team in, The Obamians: The Struggle Inside the White House to Redefine American Power. In what has been described as a sequel to the critically acclaimed, Rise of the Vulcans: The History of Bush’s War Cabinet, Mann examines the Obama Administration’s foreign policy challenges and the people who — in large part — helped define Obama’s first four years in office. At a time when mistrust in U.S. foreign policy remains high in the international community, have “The Obamians” helped change the prevailing global opinion of America’s presence abroad? Have they taken on the considerable obstacles set before them and reset the course? Join us for a discussion offering insight into President Obama’s foreign policy team, and whether or not they changed the game.

James Mann is a Foreign Policy Institute Author-in-Residence at Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. He has previously been a staff writer for The Los Angeles Times in Beijing, The Washington Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Baltimore Sun. Mr. Mann has been awarded the National Press Club Edwin M. Hood Award for diplomatic correspondence in 1993 and 1999, the Edward Weintal Prize for diplomatic reporting in 1999, the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Award for best book of the year by a journalist in 2000 and the Asia-Pacific Award for best book about Asia in 2000. His books include About Face: A History of America’s Curious Relationship with China, from Nixon to Clinton, and Rise of the Vulcans: The History of Bush’s War Cabinet. He holds a B.A. in sociology from Harvard University and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Costs
Members $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360.

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after July 5, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7055.

 

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Reflections After a Year in Islamabad
Public Policy Luncheon and Discussion
U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Reflections After a Year in Islamabad

Scott Kofmehl, Ph.D.
Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan

June 14, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

At the recent NATO summit in Chicago, disagreement between U.S. President Barack Obama and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari about the U.S. and NATO’s limitations along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border prevented the two leaders from meeting, and reflected rising tensions between the historical military allies. Roughly one year after Osama bin Laden’s killing in May 2011, the American presence in Pakistan continues to be a point of contention in balancing Pakistan’s sovereignty concerns with U.S. national security interests. Ongoing U.S. drone strikes along the Pakistani border have proven effective in targeting high-level al-Qaeda operatives, but have also fueled worries of over-projecting American influence in the country.

The recent killing of 24 Pakistani soldiers in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas by drone strikes have added more friction between Washington and Islamabad, leading to Pakistan closing critical NATO supply routes into Afghanistan. Moreover, the controversial sentencing of Shakil Afridi — a Pakistani doctor who aided the U.S. in tracking bin Laden — to 33 years in prison for conspiring with militants raises further questions about the nature of the U.S.-Pakistani intelligence cooperation. Eleven years into the conflict in Afghanistan, is the American presence in the region desired, or unwanted by key stakeholders? What is the future of the crucial relationship between the United States and one of South Asia’s most powerful and influential nations? From the vantage point of the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, join us for an off the record briefing about the state of U.S.-Pakistani relations.

Dr. Scott Kofmehl is the Chief of Staff to the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan, Cameron Munter. A Pittsburgh native and North Allegheny graduate, he earned his Bachelor’s of Arts in International Political Economy from Juniata College in 2003, his Master’s degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, and his Ph.D. from the London School of Economics. Dr. Kofmehl joined the Foreign Service in 2006 and has served in various diplomatic posts — including Vice Consul to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Mexico, and as an Economic Officer to the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. Slated to serve at the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan until July 2013, Dr. Kofmehl and his wife Aryani Manring — also a U.S. Foreign Service officer — are currently based in Islamabad.

Costs
Members $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360.

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after June 9, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

 

The World¯s Response to a Nuclear Iran
A Video Conference Discussion for High School Students
The World’s Response to a Nuclear Iran

Dr. Trita Parsi
Founder and President, National Iranian American Council

May 23, 2012

11:30 a.m — 2:00 p.m. (EDT)

Video Conference

Does Iran have the right to move forward with its nuclear program?

What will the world look like with a nuclear Iran?

How should the international community respond?

Prior to the event, students will examine a scenario, respond to questions, and prepare brief comments from the perspective of an assigned country to explore that nation’s relationship with Iran, its role in the international community, and its policies on nuclear technology. During the video conference, students will share their ideas and engage in a roundtable and concession discussion with the hopes of coming to a consensus among the international community about Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

Dr. Trita Parsi is the founder and president of the National Iranian American Council and an expert on US-Iranian relations, Iranian politics, and Middle East politics. He is the author of A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran and Treacherous Alliance: The Secret Dealings of Iran, Israel and the United States. He is the 2010 recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Dr. Parsi has followed Middle East politics through work on Capitol Hill and at the United Nations. He has worked for the Swedish Permanent Mission to the UN, where he served in the Security Council, handling the affairs of Afghanistan, Iraq, Tajikistan and Western Sahara, and in the General Assembly's Third Committee, addressing human rights in Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar and Iraq. He is widely published and is a frequent guest on radio and television.

Schedule

 11:30 - 11:35 a.m.Welcome
 11:40 a.m. - NoonRemarks by Dr. Parsi
 Noon - 12:40 p.m.Roundtable discussion by country and Q&A
 12:40 - 12:55 p.m.Preparation of concessions
 12:55  - 1:15 p.m.Sharing of concessions
 1:15 - 2:00 p.m.Discussion of policy options

A limited number of schools may participate.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7973 or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, AIU3, and Cornell School District

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Europe After the French Elections: Renegotiating Europe¯s ¯Fiscal Pact¯
Breakfast Briefing
Europe After the French Elections: Renegotiating Europe’s “Fiscal Pact”

Dr. Ulrike Guérot
Director of the Berlin Office and Senior Research Fellow
European Council on Foreign Relations

June 12, 2012

8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

K&L Gates Center, 210 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

It is official: the recent presidential election in France was an upset. By unseating former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, François Hollande has promised new policies and a different approach to the financial crisis affecting Europe. He argues for stimulus instead of austerity and higher public spending instead of budget cuts. Yet in the midst of this power shift in France, the European sovereign debt crisis draws deeper divides between European states over the proposed “fiskalpakt.” President-elect Hollande does not mince words about standing up to German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the issue of European fiscal solvency. Chancellor Merkel has stated that her policy prescription is not up for negotiation. Eighteen months from elections in Germany, a new hierarchy of power has materialized in Europe, leaving many to wonder who will emerge in the leadership role. Further complicating the situation, Greece’s debt crisis continues to escalate amidst its own tumultuous election, with a lack of coalition government destabilizing European markets and directly threatening the world economy.

What does this mean for the United States and its fragile recovery from the worst economic recession in 80 years? How will U.S. leadership — in the process of its own election cycle — respond to this new balance of power in Europe? How will things play out as a new French president institutes new policies? In terms of security, the transatlantic relationship between the U.S. and its military allies in Europe will come to the forefront of the upcoming elections, as NATO’s role in both in Afghanistan and future engagements is further developed. Join us for a conversation about the future of the U.S.-European relationship and the impact of the elections on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

Ulrike Guérot joined the European Council on Foreign Relations in July 2007 as a Senior Research Fellow and Representative for Germany. Previously she was the Senior Transatlantic Fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States (2004-2007). Prior to that she headed the European Union unit at the German Council on Foreign Relations in Berlin (2000-2003). Dr. Guerot was also an Assistant Professor of European Studies at Johns Hopkins University, a Senior Research Fellow at Notre Europe in Paris, and a staff member of the German Bundestag's Commission on External Affairs. She publishes widely on European and transatlantic issues in various journals and newspapers, and is frequently invited to comment on several EU issues in the media. She has been awarded the prestigious ‘Ordre pour le Merite' for her engagement on European integration.

There is no charge for World Affairs Council members, and a $25 charge for non-members.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after June 7, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With special thanks to K&L Gates.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Overcoming Religious Extremism in India:  The Koraput Survivors Project
Political Salon
Overcoming Religious Extremism in India:
The Koraput Survivors Project

Jen Saffron, writer, educator and curator of photographs

Lynn Johnson, professional photographer

June 5, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Over the last decade, U.S. attention to religious extremism and sectarian violence has focused largely on terror threats and attacks stemming from areas of conflict in the Middle East and Central Asia. However, this type of extremism is not exclusive to nations in the midst of armed conflict. It is also manifest in countries that are at the forefront of economic and social development. Enter India. With its enormous population and growing economy, many view India as one of the preeminent powers on the world stage. Much focus is paid to India’s markets, its relationship with China, and its emergence as a regional hegemon vis-à-vis its powerful and influential neighbors. Yet what about the internal workings of a country that has over one billion people, multiple religions, and hundreds of dialects? Particularly, has India moved away from its traditional caste system and articulated universal human rights for its citizens, protecting its vulnerable populations from violence?

As India continues to move forward into the 21st century at breakneck speed, Lynn Johnson and Jen Saffron shed light onto the struggles of a suffering community in Koraput, a group of Christians who have been victimized by Hindu extremists. In 2008, 3,000 armed Hindu extremists burned their village to the ground, seeking to forcefully reintegrate the villagers into a caste system to which they consciously object. The community was left destitute. In response, the community banded together and relocated to Koraput in order to rebuild. Through a fundraising campaign, blog, and numerous photo essays, Ms. Saffron and Ms. Johnson follow the daily struggle Koraput villagers undergo in order to carve out a peaceful home. Join us for a discussion about religious freedom, cooperation, and a will to overcome all obstacles. 

Lynn Johnson is a veteran photojournalist with over 35 years of experience documenting the human condition. With many credits in both National Geographic and Sports Illustrated, she has focused her lens on challenging global issues, such as disease, landmines, and threatened languages. She discovered the plight of the Koraput survivors while on assignment for National Geographic in India.

Click here to view a recent Pop City article featuring Lynn Johnson and her global photography.

Jen Saffron began her photography career as a youth activist in Washington D.C. during the 1980s. Since then she has been a leading voice in human rights advocacy, engaging the topic as a writer, educator, and curator of photographs. Specifically focusing on race relations in the U.S., the Iraq War, and sectarian violence, she has created documentaries and publications that showcase the narratives of individuals who experience daily the hardships placed upon them through injustice and inequity.

Costs
Members $15 | Non-Members: $25. Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 30, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to Bricolage for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Energy of Diversity
Panel Discussion and Reception
The Energy of Diversity

Richard Gabbianelli
Senior Vice President, Westinghouse

Sola Talabi
Product Risk Manager and Interface Manager, Westinghouse 

Sylvie Tran
Development Manager, Shell Appalachia 

Dr. Steven E. Sokol (Moderator)
President and CEO, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

May 30, 2012

6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Josh Hickman at josh.hickman@ypenergy.org.

As Pittsburgh emerges as an energy capital domestically and on the world stage, the city draws international professionals from around the globe as they acquire jobs in the region and make Pittsburgh their home. The region’s energy mix, focusing on both traditional and alternative energy sources, has also contributed to an influx of professionals of with diverse backgrounds moving to the area. How are these international professionals enriching the region? What are the benefits of a more globalized energy market for the Pittsburgh area? Where can these local professionals act as ambassadors for Pennsylvania’s energy market to expand the region's reach into international markets?

The Young Professionals in Energy  — in partnership with the Allegheny Conference and the World Affairs Council  — have organized this panel to highlight the need for and pursuit of energy options across all sectors, both locally and globally. This event will feature speakers with international backgrounds who live and work in the Pittsburgh region. They will share their insights on the international and national energy economies, and will also focus on the strengths that diverse professionals bring to the energy field as a whole — and this community in specific. This is a networking opportunity not to be missed for those interested in an international perspective on the energy industry.

There is no cost for this event. Registration is required and space is limited.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Josh Hickman at josh.hickman@ypenergy.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Evan Kaufmann International Faceoff: Cross Cultural Understanding Through Sports
Conversation and Luncheon
International Faceoff: Cross Cultural Understanding Through Sports

Evan Kaufmann
Forward, DEG Metro Stars, Düsseldorf (Germany)
Member of the German National Ice Hockey Team

May 30, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

The Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Can sports help break down barriers and serve as a means for cultural diplomacy? For Evan Kaufmann, a Minnesota-born hockey player who currently plays for the Düsseldorf-based club DEG Metro Stars, playing professional ice hockey in Germany is more than fulfilling his career ambition as a professional athlete. In 2008, Mr. Kaufmann began his pro career on German ice 70 years after his grandfather survived the Holocaust. Mr. Kaufmann is one of a small contingent of Jewish professional athletes in Germany, and despite the progress made toward reconciliation and forgiveness in Germany with regard to its past, a divide still exists. Acknowledging the suffering of his family and countless others at the hands of the Nazis, Mr. Kaufmann navigates daily the lingering shadows of a horrific national experience while fulfilling  both his professional and personal aspirations. In multiple ways, Mr. Kaufmann’s experience in Germany reflects the purity of sport, an essence that transcends cultural differences and instead fosters understanding and dialogue. Yet after such a traumatic chapter of the 20th century that left its indelible mark on world history, can hockey — and sports in general — help build a bridge between cultures? As a common language? Join us for a discussion about overcoming bias and how sports can help connect us all.

Evan Kaufmann born October 31, 1984, in Minneapolis, MN, is a Jewish professional hockey player currently living in Germany. Since childhood, he has had a passion for hockey. After playing four seasons under scholarship at the University of Minnesota, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in Accounting and was a four time All-Academic Team selection, Mr. Kaufmann signed his first professional hockey contract to compete for the Düsseldorf Metro Stars of the Deutsche Eishockey Liga (DEL) based in Germany. Most recently, he has gained attention worldwide with his decision to take on dual citizenship between the USA and Germany, and by competing as a member of the German National Hockey Team. He and his wife Danielle are expecting their first child in June in Minneapolis before they return to Nürerrnberg, Germany, where he has signed a three-year contract to continue playing in the DEL. Mr. Kaufmann is the subject of a recent article written in the sports section of The New York Times by Jeré Longman, titled: “A Jewish Hockey Player at History’s Indelible Crossroad.”

Costs
$30 per person. Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after May 25, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With special thanks to the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Revisiting the ¯Axis of Evil¯
A Roundtable Dinner for Educators
Revisiting the “Axis of Evil”

Ambassador Christopher Hill
Dean of the Josef Korbel School for International Studies at the University of Denver and former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq

May 10, 2012

5:30 - 8:15 p.m.

The Omni William Penn, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

This event is offered at no charge to secondary school teachers and administrators.

As the war in Iraq comes to a close, many policy analysts are considering the fate of the “Axis of Evil’s” two other nations, North Korea and Iran. In 2012 alone, North Korea experienced a change in political leadership with the succession of Kim Jong-un, while international tensions have escalated to talk of a possible war involving Iran. How useful is the “Axis of Evil” label in understanding international political dynamics? Is this decade-old idea still important in calculating global threats, or should policymakers rethink the United States’ strategic approach to these countries?

Join us for a conversation with Ambassador Christopher Hill for expert projections on America’s role in the world’s most pressing geopolitical conflicts.

Ambassador Christopher Robert Hill is the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at The University of Denver, a position he has held since September 2010. He is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as U.S. Ambassador to Iraq from April 2009 until August 2010. Prior to Iraq, Amb. Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Earlier, He was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea. Previously, he served as U.S. Ambassador to Poland (2000-2004), Ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-1999), and Special Envoy to Kosovo (1998-1999). He also served as a Special Assistant to the President and a Senior Director on the staff of the National Security Council, 1999-2000. Earlier in his Foreign Service career, Amb. Hill served tours in Belgrade, Warsaw, Seoul, and Tirana, and on the Department of State's Policy Planning staff and in the Department’s Operation Center. While on a fellowship with the American Political Science Association he served as a staff member for Congressman Stephen Solarz working on Eastern European issues. He also served as the Department of State's Senior Country Officer for Poland. Amb. Hill received the State Department’s Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis. Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Amb. Hill served as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural Cameroon, West Africa.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. Participants must register to attend. 

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

This Roundtable is made possible through the generous support of the Grable Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Revisiting the ¯Axis of Evil¯: What Next?
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon on the Occasion of the 81st Annual Meeting
Revisiting the “Axis of Evil”: What Next?

Ambassador Christopher Hill
Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver and former Ambassador to Iraq

May 11, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

As the war in Iraq comes to a close, many policy analysts are considering the fate of the “Axis of Evil’s” two other nations, North Korea and Iran. In 2012 alone, North Korea experienced a change in political leadership with the succession of Kim Jong-un, while in the same year international tensions has escalated to talk of a possible war involving Iran. How useful is the “Axis of Evil” label in understanding international political dynamics? Is this decade-old idea still important to calculating global threats, or should policy makers rethink the United States’ strategic approach to Asia? Join former Ambassador Christopher Hill for expert projections on America’s role in the world’s most pressing current and future geopolitical conflicts.

Prior to Ambassador Hill’s address, the Council will present the Donald E. Farr and George C. Oehmler Awards to an outstanding high school student and teacher in connection with Council programs.

Ambassador Christopher R. Hill is the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at The University of Denver, a position he has held since September 2010. He is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as U.S. Ambassador to Iraq from April 2009 until August 2010.  Prior to Iraq, Amb. Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Earlier, He was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea.  Previously he served as U.S. Ambassador to Poland (2000-2004), Ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-1999), and Special Envoy to Kosovo (1998-1999).  He also served as a Special Assistant to the President and a Senior Director on the staff of the National Security Council, 1999-2000.  Earlier in his Foreign Service career, Amb. Hill served tours in Belgrade, Warsaw, Seoul, and Tirana, and on the Department of State's Policy Planning staff and in the Department’s Operation Center.  While on a fellowship with the American Political Science Association he served as a staff member for Congressman Stephen Solarz working on Eastern European issues.  He also served as the Department of State's Senior Country Officer for Poland.  Amb. Hill received the State Department’s Distinguished Service Award for his contributions as a member of the U.S. negotiating team in the Bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the Robert S. Frasure Award for Peace Negotiations for his work on the Kosovo crisis.  Prior to joining the Foreign Service, Amb. Hill served as a Peace Corps volunteer in rural Cameroon, West Africa.

Costs
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after May 5, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

Trapped in a Paradigm of Enmity?  The Obama Administration's Diplomacy with Iran
Political Salon
Trapped in a Paradigm of Enmity? The Obama Administration's Diplomacy with Iran

Dr. Trita Parsi
Founder and President of the National Iranian American Council and author of A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran

May 23, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Conflict Kitchen, 124 S. Highland Ave, Pittsburgh, PA

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

This event is co-sponsored by the Conflict Kitchen and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh

Policy analysts speculated whether President Obama’s 2009 address to the Muslim world from Cairo, Egypt, would usher in a new era of diplomacy between the United States and Islamic communities. On the issue of Iran, however, little progress has been made. Throughout 2009 and 2010, governments in the United States and Iran were challenged to balance competing domestic concerns which hampered diplomatic efforts to address issues such as nuclear ambitions and Iran’s support of groups such as Hezbollah and Hamas. Today, in the face of an ongoing international dialogue about a possible war involving Iran in 2012, it seems that neither side has exhausted all of the diplomatic tools at their disposal.

Can the Obama administration avoid another costly conflict in the Middle East, or does Iran prove to be such a threat that action must be taken? What diplomatic tools have not yet been used, and how do other international players such as European and Arab nations factor in to diplomacy? How does the United States’ relationship with Israel affect this situation? Join Dr. Trita Parsi for a timely discussion of the Obama administration’s policy regarding Iran.

Click here to view a clip of Dr. Parsi on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

Dr. Trita Parsi is the founder and president of the National Iranian American Council and an expert on US-Iranian relations, Iranian politics, and Middle East politics. He is the author of the book A Single Roll of the Dice: Obama’s Diplomacy with Iran, as well as Treacherous Alliance: The Secret Dealings of Iran, Israel and the United States. He is the 2010 recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Dr. Parsi has followed Middle East politics through work on Capitol Hill and at the United Nations. He has worked for the Swedish Permanent Mission to the UN, where he served in the Security Council, handling the affairs of Afghanistan, Iraq, Tajikistan and Western Sahara, and in the General Assembly's Third Committee, addressing human rights in Iran, Afghanistan, Myanmar and Iraq. Dr. Parsi’s articles on Middle East affairs have been published in the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Jane's Intelligence Review, the Nation, The American Conservative, the Jerusalem Post, The Forward, and others. He is a frequent guest on CNN, PBS's Newshour with Jim Lehrer, NPR, the BBC, and Al Jazeera. Dr. Parsi is a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, where he has served as an adjunct professor.

Costs
There is a $15 charge for this event. Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 18, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

21st Century Global Threats and the Role of the U.S. Navy
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
21st Century Global Threats and the Role of the U.S. Navy

Rear Admiral Craig S. Faller
Commander, Carrier Strike Group Three

May 16, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

HYP Club, 619 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh

Today’s naval force plays a profound role in representing and defending the United States in global conflicts. The United States favors a military realignment that sees the Navy as central to protecting the liberal world order. This new focus on the Navy as a main part of American defensive military strategy was underscored when recently Secretary of State Hillary Clinton noted that the Navy proves central in responding to issues such as Chinese military power, North Korean weapons capabilities, securing the Strait of Hormuz near Iran, and fighting global piracy on the high seas. The Navy also plays a vital part in securing the world’s economic trade routes, and assists with disaster situations, such its quick responses to earthquakes and flooding. With greater technological assets than ever, the Navy’s forward thinking approach to security and warfare will no doubt continue to be of vital importance. As the Obama administration supports bolstering naval power, particularly in Southeast Asia, what will be the reaction of economic partners, such as China? Will the U.S. continue to renew partnerships with allies such as  Australia? What can Americans expect from a renewed naval force? Join Rear Admiral Craig S. Faller for an intriguing and timely  discussion of the Navy in the 21st century.

Rear Admiral Craig S. Faller was appointed to his current position as Commander of Carrier Strike Group Three on May 24, 2011. Previously he served as Commander of Navy Recruiting Command. At sea, he has served on the USS Peterson, USS Enterprise, USS Hancock, Commanding Officer of USS Stethem, and Commanding Officer of USS Shiloh. He has also served as Executive Assistant to the Commander of the U.S. Pacific Command and Commander, U.S. Central Command. Ashore, he  has served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, legislative fellow for Senator Edward Kennedy, as head of Surface Nuclear Officer Programs, and as Executive Assistant to the Chief of Naval Operations.

A native of Fryburg, Pennsylvania, he graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering in 1983. He earned a Master’s in National Security Affairs (Strategic Planning) from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1990. His awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (four awards), Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (four awards), and Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal.

Costs
Members of either organization: $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360

To register at a special student rate for this event, please call 412-281-7970.

Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after May 11, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Public Policy Luncheon and Discussion  WHO RULES IRAN?
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Who Rules Iran?

Nazila Fathi
Former New York Times Journalist, Translator, and Commentator on Iran

May 4, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Heinz Hall, Mozart Room, 600 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Concerns about the tensions between Iran, the United States, and Israel dominate international politics as all sides debate the  possibility of war over Iran’s continuing nuclear program. However, within Iranian society, tensions boil under the surface. Citizens seeking freedom challenge religious ayatollahs, and the same religious leaders experience infighting and competition. President Mahmoud Ahmedinejad has differed on issues with the Parliament and the ruling establishment. Reformers seek out ways to evade internet and press censorship, while a cultural struggle ensues between clerics and young citizens. The international community remains concerned about human rights issues regarding the treatment of prisoners, the status of women, and the detention of dissenters. With nearly two-thirds of the Iranian population born after the 1979 revolution, can Ayatollah Ali Khamenei preserve the state’s ironclad grip? What is the real balance of power within Iran?

Nazila Fathi is a journalist, translator, and commentator on Iran. She reported from Iran for nearly two decades until 2009 when she was forced to leave the country because of government threats against her. From 2001 until she left, she was The New York Times’ correspondent in Tehran –  and wrote over 2,000 articles. Prior to that, she wrote for Time magazine, Agence France-Presse, and the Times. She translated a book, History and Documentation of Human Rights in Iran, by the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Shirin Ebadi, into English in 2001. She has written for The New York Review of Books, Foreign Policy, Nieman Reports, and the online publication, openDemocracy. Ms. Fathi has been a guest speaker on CNN, BBC, CBC, NPR, and at several academic institutions including Stanford University and Harvard University. In 2003, she was awarded the Raoul Wallenberg Fellowship at Lund University. She was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard in 2010-11 and is currently at the Shorenstein Center where she is working on a book on Iran.

Costs
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 30, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Immigration, Integration, and Open Societies: Europe and the United States in Comparison
Breakfast Briefing
Immigration, Integration, and Open Societies: Europe and the United States in Comparison

Paul Scheffer
Professor of European Studies at Tilburg University and author of Immigrant Nations

April 27, 2012

8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Both the United States and the European Union struggle with concerns over employment, claiming rights, and preserving cultural, religious, and linguistic traditions in the face of rapid legal and illegal immigration. However, immigrants bring with them important skills and talents that are vital to growing economies. A comparison of the United States and the European Union provides important insight to the challenges and benefits of immigration in a globalized society.  Do different polices on both sides of the Atlantic regarding multiculturalism, immigration, and integration affect citizens and their daily attitudes towards immigrants in their communities? How can the U.S. and the EU find better ways to integrate foreigners into their societies? Would changing the notion and function of citizenship help countries navigate this difficult issues? What are the drawbacks and gains of the migratory movements of the 21st century in the United States and Europe?

Join Vibrant Pittsburgh and the World Affairs Council for a Breakfast Briefing that promises to challenge conventional thinking on immigration, and provide perspective on integration strategies that suit immigrants and host nations.

Paul Scheffer is professor of European Studies at the University of Tilburg. He studied psychology and political science in Nijmegen, Amsterdam and Paris. Mr. Scheffer worked as a correspondent in Paris and Warsaw. Between 2003 and 2011 he was professor of urban questions at the University of Amsterdam. He writes columns and essays for the daily newspaper NRC Handelsblad and made several documentaries for television. His articles have been published in several European papers and magazines, such as Die Zeit, De Morgen, Frankfurter Allgemeine, Politiken and El Pais. His latest book is on migration in Europe and America called Immigrant Nations.

Costs
There is a $10 charge to attend this event.

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after April 23, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Rethinking Cities in the 21st Century
Rethinking Cities in the 21st Century

April 26, 2012

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust's Arts Education Center, 805 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Please join us for a stimulating discussion on the transformation of post-industrial cities in the United States and Europe -- as they strive to meet the challenges of the 21st century. How do cities on each side of the Atlantic differ in they way they tackle common concerns? What are the different strategies for development?  Listen as Dutch and American experts discuss the architectural, economic, political, and sociological aspects of redeveloping cities in the 21st century.

The program will feature:

  • Donald Carter, Director of the Remaking Cities Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)
  • Vivian Loftness, University Professor at CMU’s School of Architecture
  • Paul Scheffer, Professor of Urban Sociology, Tilberg University, Netherlands
  • Rijk van Ark, Director of Economic Affairs, City of Amsterdam

Rob de Vos, Consul General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, will be the moderator.

To RSVP, please email cities@trustarts.org. For more information, visit trustarts.org/dutchfestival. There is no charge to attend this event.

This event is part of the 2012 Distinctively Dutch Festival co-sponsored by:


Remaking Cities Institute

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Survival and Prosperity in the Heart of Europe? Switzerland, the European Union, and the Euro Crisis
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Survival and Prosperity in the Heart of Europe? Switzerland, the European Union, and the Euro Crisis

Ambassador François Barras
Consul General of Switzerland in New York

April 20, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Fairmont Hotel, 510 Market Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Since the formal founding of the European Union in 1993, the Swiss people have continuously voted against membership in the 27 state confederation. Despite being landlocked by EU member states and relying heavily on the EU as its number one partner for goods and services, Switzerland’s banking sector has thrived and its global reach has widened during the European sovereign-debt crisis. How has Switzerland managed to fare so well in this time of global economic turmoil? Is the Swiss economy projected to meet the fate of so many of its European neighbors, or will it continue to promote stability in the region? How will Switzerland deal with its neighbors?

Join Ambassador François Barras, Consul General of Switzerland, for a luncheon that promises to address the core challenges of the Euro Crisis, Switzerland’s model for success, and a possible example for nations striving for economic recovery.

Ambassador François Barras was appointed to his current position as Consul General of Switzerland in New York in October 2010. Since 1999, he has served as the Swiss Ambassador to a number of countries and regions including Lebanon, Hong Kong and Macao, and the United Arab Emirates. Before serving as a Swiss Ambassador, he worked in several positions throughout the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (FDFA) including in the Embassy of Switzerland in both Mexico City and in Washington, D.C. He has also held the position of Head of Culture and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Division for the FDFA and Advisor for Diplomatic Affairs to the Swiss Minister of Foreign Affairs. A native of Sierre, Switzerland, he holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Law from the University of Geneva, a Master’s Degree in Anthropology from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in Legal Anthropology from the University of London.

Costs
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 16, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With support from Switzerland Trade & Investment Promotion.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

Public Policy Luncheon and Discussion  THE INDO-PACIFIC, THE AMERICAS, AND AUSTRALIA¯S GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT
Public Policy Luncheon and Discussion
The Indo-Pacific, the Americas, and Australia’s Global Engagement

Phillip Scanlan
Australian Consul General in New York

April 11, 2012

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

As U.S. foreign policy pivots toward Asia, government and policy experts are focusing on the Pacific, making regional allies and their outposts increasingly valuable. Australia — a longtime U.S. partner — proves invaluable in this endeavor. Serving as a major player in the region, Australia provides vital insight on the affairs of China, India, and Indonesia. In November 2011, President Obama announced that 2,500 servicemen and women would be deployed to northern Australia. The United States now also has bases in Japan, South Korea, and Australia.

What role does Australian policy play in the region? How do nations such as China and North Korea respond to Australian power in the region? How will the renewed U.S. presence on the island continent change Pacific economic, political, and military regional relations? Join us for a timely discussion of Australian operations in  in the Pacific with Australian Consul General Phillip Scanlan.

Australian Consul General Phillip Scanlan has a career which spans the private sector, education, public policy, NGO entrepreneurship, and diplomacy. He has more than 25 years of global experience in senior executive and chairman roles including his leadership at Coca Cola Amatil. In 1992, Mr. Scanlan founded the bipartisan Australian American Leadership Dialogue. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (FAICD), a longstanding member of the YPO/WPO global entrepreneurial network, has served on the Business Council of Australia, and on the Board of Asialink . He has served on the Fulbright board, was inaugural chairman of The Sydney Institute and has been a spokesman for Amnesty International in South Australia.

As Consul General, Mr. Scanlan has continued to strengthen the platform of engagement assembled by his predecessors through a range of initiatives including the Australian American Leadership Conversations, the New York Young Leaders Program, and the Australia Day Address, delivered by prominent Australians extolling the privileges of Australian citizenship through their personal narratives.

Costs
Council Members: $45 | Non-Members: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360
Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after April 6, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

In cooperation with the Center for International Relations and Politics at Carnegie Mellon University and the American Middle East Institute.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

Summer Institute for Teachers - Teaching Contemporary Global Issues
15th Annual Summer Institute for Teachers - Teaching Contemporary Global Issues
June 26-28, 2012

A Unique Opportunity for Secondary School Teachers, Administrators, and Education Coordinators

June 26, 2012

8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Duquesne University, 324 Fisher Hall, Pittsburgh, PA

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Duquesne University

Continuing Professional Education Credit available for this course through Allegheny Intermediate Unit, pending approval by the  Pennsylvania Department of Education

Graduate credit available through Duquesne University’s School of Education

June 26: The Economics of Global Education
Dr. Najeeb Shafiq, Associate Professor of Economics and Education, University of Pittsburgh

June 27: A Shifting Middle East: The Arab Upheaval
Dr. Safei-Eldin Hamed, Professor, Chatham University; Past President, The Alliance of Egyptian Americans

Dr. Ahmad Khalili, Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Professional Studies, Slippery Rock University

June 28: China: Challenges and Opportunities in the Middle Kingdom
Tom Sanderson, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

The mission of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh is to promote among secondary teachers and students in the region:

  • a global perspective for a global century
  • informed and independent thinking about world affairs
  • critical understanding about important issues in an interdependent world as they affect the nation and the region

The Summer Institute for Teachers will:

  • help teachers to develop and maintain their skills, to access resources necessary to keep up with this dynamic and often volatile world, and to adapt their curricula accordingly

and will provide:

  • information on contemporary world issues and the global role of the United States
  • a framework for looking at international issues that reflects their highly complex and interrelated nature
  • an orientation to additional resources which teachers can access to enhance existing curricula and to support understanding of global issues throughout the academic year
  • methods of integrating new knowledge into lesson plans and other experience-based classroom activities designed to enhance the effectiveness of world affairs education

What is the Summer Institute for Teachers?
The Institute is a three-day workshop which consists of presentations on contemporary world affairs, small group problem solving exercises, and lesson-planning sessions with direct application to your curriculum.

Why is the Institute relevant?
The world is changing rapidly and textbooks simply cannot keep up.

This course will provide an update on important international issues, help you to develop a framework for critical thinking and problem-solving, and facilitate the creation of lesson plans and materials.

What is the cost of the Institute?
There is a $25 non-refundable registration fee for the Institute.

This fee will help to cover the cost of materials, as well as breakfast and lunch for all three days.  

Those seeking Continuing Professional Education credit are also responsible for the processing fee of $40 to the Allegheny Intermediate Unit.  A separate application for CPE credit will be distributed at the Institute.

How do I register for the Institute?
Participants must register to participate.

Questions?
Contact Allyce Pinchback, Program Officer, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at:
412-224-4092 or email allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

This Institute is made possible in part through generous support of the Henry C. Frick Educational Fund of The Buhl Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breakfast Briefing: Unconventional Gas in Europe: Two Perspectives on the Impact on Energy Supply
Breakfast Briefing
Unconventional Gas in Europe: Two Perspectives on the Impact on Energy Supply

Dr. Christian Burgsmueller
Counselor, Head, Transport, Energy,
Environment & Nuclear Matters Section,
European Union Delegation

Konstantin Simonov
Executive Director
National Energy Security Fund, Russia

March 23, 2012

8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

While energy has been a hot topic in southwestern Pennsylvania, alternative fuel sources are also taking center stage in Europe and Russia. In summer 2011, Germany announced that it would strive to go carbon neutral, while at the same time Americans are debating Marcellus Shale gas drilling as an alternative to foreign petroleum. In Russia, oil production remains strong with the government lobby groups and employees as stakeholders in the system.

What can Americans learn from observing other countries’ energy policies? Can we strike a balance between current power solutions and alternative fuels? Join Dr. Christian Burgsmueller and Konstantin Simonov for a discussion that will bridge local and global issues, as well as short-term and long-range solutions, related to energy policy.

Dr. Christian Burgsmueller is a career EU diplomat with the European External Action Service (EEAS) and currently serves as Counselor at the European Union Delegation to the United States in Washington, D.C. where he heads the Energy, Transport, and Environment section. Having studied law in Freiberg, Geneva, and Cologne, he worked as a trainee solicitor in Dusseldorf, Brussels, Cologne, and Buenos Aires before passing the German Bar Exam. In 2000, he joined the European Commission in Brussels. Over the following six years, he held posts both in the Commission's Directorate-General for the Enterprise and Industry as well as in the Directorate-General for Trade. From 2006 through 2010 he headed the Political, Economic and Public Affairs section of the European Union Delegation to Brazil in Brasilia.

Konstantin Simonov has a master's degree in political sciences from Manchester University. He has been an associate professor of political science at the Moscow State University. In 2003, he became Chief of the Center for Current Politics. In summer 2006, Simonov founded and became head of the National Energy Security Fund, which specializes in nonpublic politics, executive power of Russia, political risk, and economic interests of political elites. His mission is to study economic aspects of the political processes and political aspects of the economic processes. He authored the first Russian-language text-book on political analysis. In 2005, he published the book entitled Russian Oil: the Last Repartition on political in-fighting for the domestic oil & gas industry. In 2006, he published another book entitled The Energy  Superpower focusing on the global struggle for oil and gas. In 2007, he published the book The Global Energy War, completing his oil and gas trilogy. He publishes frequently in the Russian and foreign press on home and foreign policy of Russia, energy and economics, outlook on the transformation of the Russian state.

Costs
There is no charge for World Affairs Council members, and a $25 charge for non-members.

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 21, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Annual Summer Seminar on World Affairs
37th Annual Summer Seminar on World Affairs
June 18-22, 2012

June 18, 2012

9:00 a.m. - Noon

Duquesne University

What is it?
The Summer Seminar on World Affairs is a one-week, intensive look at some of the major current international issues confronting the United States in its political, economic, and security relations with the rest of the world.

This unique program, designed for student leaders entering their junior or senior year in high school, is sponsored jointly by the World Affairs Council and Duquesne University.  

Important: Students may only attend the Summer Seminar once due to a limited number of scholarships each year.

When is it?
The Summer Seminar will be held during June 18–22, 2012 at Duquesne University in downtown Pittsburgh. Students will meet each day from 9:00 a.m. until noon.

How much will it cost?
Sponsoring organizations are offering 75 full scholarships to those students who are selected to participate in this program.

Please note: Participants must arrange for their own transportation. Parking is available at Duquesne University at a discounted rate.  Meals are not included.

What topics will be covered?
Among the issues under consideration for inclusion in this year's Summer Seminar are:

  • Defining America’s Role in the World
  • Challenges Facing the Middle East
  • The Future of U.S.-Latin American Relations
  • A New Deal for Africa
  • Changing Dynamics of America and Asia

The Summer Seminar on World Affairs emphasizes critical thinking and problem-solving exercises, and a close dialogue between students and nationally-respected experts in each of the topic areas.

How can students apply?
To be considered for a full scholarship to the Summer Seminar on World Affairs, a student must submit an application and teacher recommendation.

Applications and teacher recommendation forms can be submitted through online application forms or downloaded and sent in by mail.

To submit online, please use the following links:

2012 SSWA Application Form

2012 SSWA Teacher Recommendation Form

To submit a paper application, please download the documents, using the following link:

2012 SSWA Application and Teacher Recommendation Form

The application deadline is Monday, May 14, 2012.  Applicants will be notified by Monday, May 28, 2012. 

If submitting a paper application, please mail it to:

Christina Unger, Program Officer
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
2640 BNY Mellon Center
500 Grant Street
Pittsburgh, PA  15219

Questions?
Please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7027 or by e-mail at christina@worldpittsburgh.org with any questions you may have.

Download a PDF brochure by clicking here!

 

How Can I Prepare for the Changing World? Succeeding in the Age of Globalization A Panel Discussion and Videoconference for High School Students
How Can I Prepare for the Changing World?
Succeeding in the Age of Globalization
A Panel Discussion and Video Conference for High School Students

April 27, 2012

9:00 - 10:30 a.m.

Elizabeth Forward High School, 100 Weigles Hill Road, Elizabeth, PA, 15037 and Video Conference

Presented by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in partnership with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3 and Elizabeth Forward High School


Do you hope to find a job someday?

Are you wondering how globalization will affect your future?

Do you know what skills you will need to be successful in a global workforce?

Have you wondered why cross-cultural communication and cultural understanding are so important?

Today’s students will enter a global and diverse workforce where the need for employees who can speak world languages and can collaborate cross-culturally is imperative. Whether you plan to work abroad or to never leave the region, globalization will bring the world to you. No matter what field you’re considering, our changing world means that you will need new skills and knowledge to be competitive and successful in the future.

Hear from a panel of prominent international business leaders to learn about intercultural skills, critical languages, new business practices, exciting international careers, and the changing global marketplace.

The world is changing…will you be ready?

There is no cost to attend this program. Participants may attend in-person or via video conference. Please use the links below to register.

Participation at Elizabeth Forward High School
Elizabeth Forward High School can accommodate up to 150 student participants from throughout the Pittsburgh region. Click here to register.

Participation via Video Conference
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference.  Video conference equipment is required. Click here to register.

Questions?
Contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7027 or by email at christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

        


 

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

Finishing the Job: Making the World Polio-Free
Finishing the Job: Making the World Polio-Free
A Panel Discussion, International Video Conference, and Webcast for Middle and High School Students

April 12, 2012

Registration: 8:30 - 9:00 a.m.
Interactive Panel Discussion: 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.

O’Hara Student Center, University of Pittsburgh, 4024 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 and Video Conference

A recording of this webcast will be available within the next week. Please check back and use this link.

In partnership with the Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3, Rotary District 7300, and the University of Pittsburgh

How did the polio vaccination showcase Pittsburgh
as a leader in medicine on the global stage?

What is the state of polio in the world today?

How is the international community working together to
ensure that polio is eradicated from the face of the earth?


On April 12, 1955, Dr. Jonas Salk and his team at the University of Pittsburgh proclaimed to the world that their polio vaccine was safe and effective. Since then, a worldwide effort to rid the planet of polio has led to its eradication from all but a handful of countries (Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, and India).

In celebration of the 57th anniversary of this momentous occasion, join us for a discussion with experts from the medical field and global organizations as they provide insight about collaborative polio eradication efforts. Students will use video conference technology to interact with their local and international counterparts to think critically about how countries can work together to eliminate polio once and for all.

Students may also participate in the “Take a Shot at Changing the World” digital media contest, where they will have an opportunity to create their own short films about making a difference in the world. Details can be found at  www.takeashotcontest.org.

There is no cost to attend this event. Please use the links below to register by April 1, 2012.

Participation at O’Hara Student Center, University of Pittsburgh
O’Hara Student Center can accommodate up to 150 student participants from throughout the Pittsburgh region. Click here to register.

Participation via Video Conference
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference.  Video conference equipment is required. Video conference registration is closed.

Participation via Webcast
A recording of this webcast will be available within the next week. Please check this link.

Questions?
Contact Amiena Mahsoob or Allyce Pinchback at the World Affairs Council by phone at 412-281-7970 or by email at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

School Outreach
Europe in Crisis?
The Future of the European Union
A Video Conference Discussion for High School Students

Dr. Allyson Lowe, Carlow University

Dr. Gregor Thum, University of Pittsburgh

March 27, 2012

1:00 — 2:15 p.m. (EDT)

Video Conference Discussion

In partnership with Fox Chapel Area High School and Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3

“Europe left torn between outrage and anxiety on Greece”
– Reuters

“EU faces growing opposition to austerity measures”
– The Washington Post

“Europe forecasts 'mild recession' for euro zone in 2012”
–The New York Times

In the midst of political, social, and economic unrest, Europe is faced with a myriad of tough decisions regarding the future of the European Union. Join us for an engaging videoconference discussion and an assessment of the current situation in Europe.

Register
Please register online by March 19, 2012.

Questions?
Please contact Amiena Mahsoob at World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-281-7973, or by email at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Lt. Gen. Daniel W. Christman, U.S. Army (Ret.) Senior Vice President for International Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Panel Discussion
America’s Global Leadership

Lt. Gen. Daniel W. Christman, U.S. Army (Ret.)
Senior Vice President for International Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Superintendent, U.S. Military Academy at West Point

Hon. Mark Green
U.S. Ambassador to Tanzania
Fmr. Congressman, Wisconsin

Bill Lane
Washington Director
Caterpillar, Inc.

March 27, 2012

Reception: 6:00 - 6:45 p.m.
Dinner Program: 6:45 p.m.

Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Pittsburgh

   

Join us for dinner and a conversation on why U.S. global engagement matters to Pennsylvania’s economic future. 

Featured Speaker

Lt. Gen. Daniel W. Christman, U.S. Army (Ret.)

Senior Vice President for International Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Superintendent, U.S. Military Academy at West Point (1996-2001)

Panelists

Hon. Mark Green
U.S. Ambassador to Tanzania
Fmr. Congressman, Wisconsin

Bill Lane
Washington Director
Caterpillar, Inc.

Registration for this event is closed. For information, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

 

Documentary Film and Panel Discussion  Education Unreeled: Two Million Minutes
Documentary Film and Panel Discussion
Education Unreeled: Two Million Minutes

March 8, 2012

7:00 p.m.

Winchester Thurston School, 555 Morewood Avenue, Shadyside

From the moment a student completes the eighth grade, she or he has approximately two million minutes until graduation. How they spend those minutes – by studying, playing, or socializing – is up to them. Two Million Minutes (2008) follows six students from three different countries, the US, India, and China, as they prepare for their futures and develop skills to compete in the international job market. Interviews with politicians, CEOs, and scientists provide insight into the universal importance of education in an increasingly global economy. 

The film will be followed by a panel discussion on U.S. and Asian K-12 education system. The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh joins Winchester Thurston School, the Silk Screen: Asian Arts and Culture Organization, the Asian Studies Center at the University of Pittsburgh, and the Confucius Institute for this presentation.

All films are open to the public. There is no admission charge. 

For complete information about the film series visit http://www.winchesterthurston.org/asiaunreeled.

 

Around the World in One Day
Around the World in One Day
An Interconnected Globe and Your Future:
Do You Know Where You’re Heading?

May 18, 2012

9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Monroeville Convention Center, 209 Mall Boulevard, Monroeville, PA 15146

Registration for this event is closed. Please contact Allyce Pinchback at 412-224-4092 or email allyce@worldpittsburgh.org to be placed on a waiting list.

Presented by the World Cultures Consortium of Western Pennsylvania and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh as part of the Pittsburgh Folk Festival

What are the implications of an increasingly interconnected
world for today’s students?

What skills do students need to be successful
in a global workforce?

Why is cross-cultural communication and cultural
understanding so important?

  • Find out how to put your world language and current events knowledge to use in college and in the workforce from a panel of community leaders with international careers.
     
  • Test your global IQ through an interactive trivia competition.
     
  • Take a trip around the world and visit the international marketplace and kitchens to experience ethnic food and crafts.

Schedule

  • 9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
    Registration
     
  • 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
    Panel Discussion and Q&A Session
     
  • 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
    Mini WorldQuest
     
  • 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
    Around the World Cultural Fair and International Marketplace

Thanks to the generosity of several of our funders, there is no cost to attend An Interconnected Globe and Your Future: Do You Know Where You’re Heading? Lunch is not provided for this program, but food can be purchased for a minimal cost in the international kitchens.

Registration for this event is closed. Please contact Allyce Pinchback at 412-224-4092 or email allyce@worldpittsburgh.org to be placed on a waiting list.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Transatlantic Relations after Libya, the Financial Crisis, and the U.S. Shift to the Pacific
Political Salon
Transatlantic Relations after Libya, the Financial Crisis, and the U.S. Shift to the Pacific

Program Canceled

Jan Techau
Director, Carnegie Europe

March 29, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage Theater, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

This event has been canceled. For information, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

The relationship between the United States and Europe has been one of the most enduring, stable, and defining relationships of the 21st century, built upon shared interests and strong economic, political, and cultural ties. However, the past few years have seen many challenges to the stability of the transatlantic relationship. Both the United States and Europe have been impacted by the economic recession, and the ongoing Eurozone crisis has strained economic ties across the European Union. Unrest in the Middle East and the ongoing Arab Spring have recast political realities on the ground and inspired debates on the role of organizations like NATO following operations in Libya. As the global center of gravity shifts to Asia, and the U.S. takes a foreign policy pivot toward the Pacific, will the transatlantic relationship continue to be as essential in the years to come?

Jan Techau is the Director of Carnegie Europe, the European center of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is a noted expert on EU integration and foreign policy, transatlantic affairs, and German foreign and security policy. Previously, Mr. Tehcau served at the NATO Defense College’s Research Division and was director of the Alfred von Oppenheim Center for European Policy Studies at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin. From 2001-2006 he served at the German Ministry of Defense’s Press and Information Department.

Mr. Techau is an Associate Scholar at the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA) and an Associate Fellow at both the German Council on Foreign Relations and at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS). He is a regular contributor to German and international news media.

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25
Food and drinks included.

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 26, 2012 will be charged.

This event has been canceled. For information, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to Bricolage Theater for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador Gary Doer Ambassador of Canada to the United States of America
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Canada and the United States: A Strategic Partnership for the 21st Century

Ambassador Gary Doer
Ambassador of Canada to the United States of America

March 21, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Join us for a discussion with Canadian Ambassador to the United States, Gary Doer. Ambassador Doer will touch on a number of important areas of mutual interest between the United States and Canada, including trade, investment, and cross-border energy cooperation. Currently, renewable forms of energy comprise about 16% of Canada’s total primary energy supply and Canada’s oil sands are home to the second largest oil reserves in the world. As the United States’ single largest supplier of oil and energy, the U.S.-Canada relationship is vital to North American energy security. Moving forward, how can the United States and Canada work together to develop renewable and sustainable forms of energy? How can cross-border partnerships support job creation and economic development on both sides of the border? What are the opportunities and challenges ahead for the U.S.-Canada relationship?

Ambassador Gary Doer assumed his responsibilities as Canada’s 23rd representative to the United States of America in October, 2009. Prior to taking up his current position, Ambassador Doer served as Premier of Manitoba for ten years. During that time, he worked extensively with U.S. Governors to enhance Canada-U.S. cooperation on trade, agriculture, water protection, climate change, and renewable energy.

Ambassador Doer won three consecutive elections as Premier of Manitoba and in 2005 was named by Business Week magazine as one of the top 20 international leaders on climate change. His government introduced balanced budgets during each of his ten years in office while reducing many taxes, including a plan to eliminate small business tax. As Premier, he led strategic investments in health care, education, and training and infrastructure.

Costs
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $60 | Table of eight (8) $360

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 16, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With support from the Consulate General of Canada

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Whither North Korea? A Symposium at the University of Pittsburgh
Panel Discussion and Reception
Whither North Korea?

Dr. Bruce Cumings
Swift Distinguished Service Professor
University of Chicago

L. Gordon Flake
Executive Director
Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation

March 14, 2012

Coffee Reception: 5:30 p.m.
Program: 6:00-8:00 p.m.

Frick Fine Arts 125 (Auditorium), University of Pittsburgh, Schenley Drive, Pittsburgh

During the seventeen-year rule of Kim Jong-Il, North Korea became a dictatorship armed to the teeth, but unable to feed its own people without foreign aid. However, with the death of Kim Jong-Il on December 17th, foreign policy experts around the globe have wondered aloud what the future holds for this nuclear power. “North Korea as we know it is over,” a Korea specialist who served in the second Bush administration confidently asserted in the New York Times a mere two days after Kim died. North Korea, the last Stalinist state on earth, became the latest country to join the nuclear club in 2006. All eyes are
now on Kim Jong-Un, the youngest and least-known son of Kim Jong-Il. Will the “great successor” be able to avoid national collapse? Or will the country become subsumed by its northern neighbor, China? Please join us for a panel discussion with two of the United States’ most astute Korea watchers.

The Kims' Three Bodies: Dynastic Succession and its Antecedents in North Korea

Bruce Cumings is the Swift Distinguished Service Professor in History at the University of Chicago. He is the editor of the modern volume of the Cambridge History of Korea (forthcoming). He was also the principal historical consultant for the documentary Korea: The Unknown War.

1994 Redux: North Korea's Third Generation Hereditary Succession and what it means for China, South Korea, and the United States

L. Gordon Flake is the Executive Director of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation. He has traveled to North Korea numerous times. He is on the Board of the U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea and the Advisory Council of the Korean Economic Institute of America.

Sponsored by the Asian Studies Center and the Korea Council of the University of Pittsburgh, and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

For more information, please contact Rachel Jacobson at rej16@pitt.edu.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The United Nations in the 21st Century: Opportunities and Challenges
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The United Nations in the 21st Century: Opportunities and Challenges

William K. Davis
Director, UNDP Washington, D.C. Representation Office

March 9, 2012

Noon-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

A lot has changed since the founding of the United Nations in the closing days of World War II. Originally founded by 51 member states in 1945, the United Nations is today comprised of 193 members. The UN must function in a very different landscape from the one envisioned by its founders. The world has become more globalized and multi-polar. The most pressing threats and challenges of our times—such as environmental damage, international terrorism, and cyber crime—are no longer confined to national borders. Going forward, the United Nations will have to address key issues regarding what some critics call its antiquated organizational structure. In the face of a changing world, how can the United Nations revitalize its efforts to maintain peace and security around the world? What will be the new challenges and opportunities of the 21st century and beyond?

William K. Davis joined the UNDP office in December 2011 after six years as Director of the United Nations Information Center in Washington, D.C. Since 1990, he has held a number of senior positions in the State Department’s Bureau of Legislative Affairs, including most recently as the Staff Director, Office of Global & Functional Affairs. In between State Department assignments, he worked for the Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development (OECD) as Deputy Head of Public Affairs at the OECD headquarters in Paris and at the White House as Senior Director and Director for Legislative Affairs as a member of the National Security Council Staff.

Earlier in his career, Mr. Davis worked as Budget Analyst in the Executive Office of the President and Program Analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science (1984) as well as a Master's Degree in Public Policy Studies (1987), both from Duke University.

Costs
Member: $45 | Non-Member: $60 | Students: $25 | Table of eight (8) $360

Participants must register to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 7, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Conducting Diplomacy in a War Zone:  Aiding Reconstruction and Reconciliation in Afghanistan
Breakfast Briefing
Conducting Diplomacy in a War Zone:
Aiding Reconstruction and Reconciliation in Afghanistan

Ambassador Beth Jones
Deputy Special Representative for Pakistan and Afghanistan
U.S. Department of State

March 7, 2012

8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412.281.1259.

As more than 30,000 troops sent to Afghanistan as part of a military surge prepare to withdraw by the summer of 2012, another type of surge is underway. Last year, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced plans to send civilians to Afghanistan as part of a “diplomatic surge” to help support Afghan-led efforts to reach a political solution to the conflict. Now the longest-running conflict in United States history, public support for the Afghanistan war has started to wane. The country has been gripped by Taliban insurgency and diplomatic tensions with Pakistan have complicated the situation further. Should the United States and Afghan governments negotiate with the Taliban to aid reconciliation? As U.S. troops draw down, how will the diplomatic surge aid in rebuilding the country? How successful has the diplomatic surge been, and what still needs to be done to end political stalemate in Afghanistan?

Ambassador Beth Jones was appointed Deputy Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan in October 2011. She was a Foreign Service Officer for 35 years and achieved the highest rank of Career Ambassador. She worked at a Washington-based consulting firm for six years before returning to the State Department in 2011. Previously, Beth Jones served as Assistant Secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia, U.S. Ambassador to Kazakhstan, and Special Advisor for Caspian Energy Diplomacy. Her other senior positions included Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Near East, Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassies in Bonn and Islamabad, and Executive Assistant to Secretary of State Warren Christopher. Her other overseas postings include Kabul, Cairo, Amman, Baghdad, and Berlin. 

Participants must register to attend. There is no charge for World Affairs Council members, and a $25 charge for non-members. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. No-shows and cancellations after March 2, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412.281.1259.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breakfast Briefing: Japan at the Cross-Roads - Economics and Politics after the Tohoku Earthquake
Breakfast Briefing
Japan at the Cross-Roads:
Economics and Politics after
the Tohoku Earthquake

Dr. Serguey Braguinsky
Associate Professor, Social and Decision Sciences, Engineering and Public Policy
Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University

March 9, 2012

8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

Deloitte Offices, PDC Room, 24th Floor, 2500 One PPG Place,  Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

In 1979 Harvard Professor Ezra Vogel famously proclaimed Japan to be the "number one" country in the world -- a model for the United States. More recently, Japan has become more of a poster child for economic and political malaise. In this talk, Dr. Serguey Braguinsky will present an overview of the socio-economic and political situation in Japan in recent years and will try to speculate about what lies ahead. In particular, Japan's response to the 3/11 earthquake and Fukushima tragedy, while inadequate in many respects, has also revealed the country's and its people's resilience and great potential strengths. The bottom line is that today's Japan may be as underrated by pundits and "opinion leaders" as it was once overrated by the same pundits some 30 years ago.

Dr. Serguey Braguinsky is Associate Professor of Social and Decision Sciences, Engineering, and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College. His primary research field is the economics of entrepreneurship, growth, and industrial change. Dr. Braguinsky’s current research focuses on rewards to becoming an entrepreneur and on the role of firm founders in shaping various aspects of the long-term performance of their startups and is expected to lead to new insights about the entrepreneurial function and entrepreneurs as agents of economic change, both theoretically and empirically.

Dr. Braguinsky’s secondary research field is economics of incentives and institutions, and the relationship between those and the entrepreneurial function in its role as the engine of economic growth. Dr. Braguinsky previously conducted research in Japan where he focused on the roots of Japanese success and the development of the Japanese cotton spinning industry which, according to economic historians, was the “first ever case of successful adoption of Western manufacturing system by an Asian country.”

This is a free event. Continental breakfast included. Space is limited. Participants must register by March 6, 2012 to attend. No-Shows and cancellations after March 6, 2012 will be charged. (Registered participants must bring a valid ID to gain access to the building).

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to Deloitte for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

international_womens_days_2012
Panel Discussion and Reception in Celebration of International Women’s Day 2012
Trafficking of Women and Girls:
A Global Challenge in Our Own Backyard

Dr. Mary Burke
Carlow University

S.S.A. Brad Orsini
Federal Bureau of Investigation

Dr. Muge Kokten Finkel
University of Pittsburgh

Moderated by Deborah Acklin
President and CEO, WQED Multimedia

March 15, 2012

4:00-6:00 p.m.

Point Park University, University Center - GRW Theater, 414 Wood Street, Pittsburgh, PA

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Tiffany Tupper by email at tiffany@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7048.

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh present a Panel Discussion and Reception In Celebration of International Women’s Day 2012.

Human trafficking is a crime that proves difficult to prosecute. However, most citizens are unaware of the magnitude of human rights abuses occurring in their own communities. The United Nations estimates that up to 4 million women and children are trafficked around the world for different forms of exploitation each year. Nearly every country is involved in the web of trafficking activities, either as a country of origin, destination, or transit, including the United States.

What are the conditions that give rise to human trafficking? What can be done in the international community to combat human trafficking, particularly concerning women and girls? What strategies exist to deal with this problem locally? Join us for a moderated panel discussion and reception on this pressing topic.

This event is free of charge thanks to the generosity of The Eden Hall Foundation.

Dr. Mary Burke is a faculty member in the Psychology Department at Carlow University where she is the Director of Training for the Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology. Dr. Burke's commitment to social justice and equity is manifest in her research, teaching, and activism. Currently she represents the Association for Women in Psychology on the United Nations Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations Committee on Mental Health. Dr. Burke collaboratively founded and directs the Project to End Human Trafficking. This U.S.-based non-profit group works regionally, nationally, and internationally to raise awareness about the enslavement and economic exploitation of human beings.

Supervisory Special Agent Brad Orsini entered on duty as a Special Agent in September, 1988. Following completion of training in Quantico, Virginia, SA Orsini was transferred to the Newark Division of the FBI. He spent over 16 years working violent crimes, gangs, drug organizations, public corruption and civil rights investigations. In September, 2007, SA Orsini was promoted to Supervisory Special Agent (SSA). He currently supervises the Public  Corruption and Civil Rights Squad for the Pittsburgh Division. He also oversees  the  Community Outreach Programs and is the Crisis Management Coordinator for the Pittsburgh Division.

Dr. Muge Kokten Finkel is an assistant professor of International Development at University of Pittsburgh. She has worked as a Social Development Specialist at the World Bank for the Middle East and North Africa Region. Her areas of expertise are Community-Driven Development, especially related to youth and women’s issues; Social and Environmental Impact Assessment; Country Social Analysis; Participatory Program Development; and Gender and Development. Dr. Finkel completed her PhD in Political Science at the University of Virginia, specializing in Comparative Social Policy and Japanese Politics.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Tiffany Tupper by email at tiffany@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7048.

In partnership with Point Park University and with special thanks to The Eden Hall Foundation.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Political Salon: North Korea, Smart Diplomacy, and Security Challenges in the Pacific Rim
Political Salon
North Korea, Smart Power, and Security Challenges in the Pacific Rim

Featuring Current Eisenhower Fellows at the U.S. Army War College

February 13, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

SandPresso Café, 1125 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412.281.1259.

The Asia-Pacific region has long been an important focus of U.S. policy. Trade in the region is intrinsic to worldwide economic prosperity, and the stability of the Asia-Pacific region has proven vital for U.S. strategic and security interests. However, the rise of China, tensions on the Korean Peninsula, and competition between regional powers have posed challenges to regional stability. How can the United States employ smart power to bolster stability in the Pacific rim? What is the future of the Korean Peninsula following the death of Kim Jong-Il? How can the United States work with its regional partners to ensure security in East Asia?

Join us for a discussion of these issues with U.S. Army War College fellows with extensive experience in the region.

Saiko Miyamoto is a civilian working for the U.S. Army. From 2008-2011, she was Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Host Nation Activities (G5), U.S. Army, Japan, at Camp Zama. In this capacity, she provided recommendations to the Command Group about Japan as well as regional trends that could impact U.S.-Japan bilateral relations and relevant security arrangements. Before joining the Department of the Army as a civilian employee in 2006, she worked as a freelance interpreter. Ms. Miyamoto has completed a variety of assignments dealing with bilateral defense and trade negotiations, international economic talks, national security issues, and bilateral military, political, and legal conferences.

Michael “Scotty” Patton enlisted in the Oklahoma Army National Guard and has risen to the rank of Colonel in the Army. From 2010-2011, he was the Chief of Fires (Field Artillery) for the 2nd Infantry Division at Camp Red Cloud in Korea. Previously, COL Patton served as Battalion Commander for 1st/19th Field Artillery at Fort Sill, OK. He has also served in Operations Desert Shield/Storm, Operation Desert Strike, and Operation Iraqi Freedom I and II. He also participated in NATO missions in Hungary in 2002 and assisted the South Korean Army during the Yeonpyeong Island artillery attack by North Korea in November 2010. His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal.

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25
Food and drinks included.

Seating is limited. Please register by February 8, 2011 to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 10, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412.281.1259.

With thanks to SandPresso Café

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Sebastian Junger Award-Winning Journalist and Best-Selling Author
Literary Evenings
Monday Night Lecture Series

Sebastian Junger
Award-Winning Journalist and Best-Selling Author

February 27, 2012

Private World Affairs Council Reception with Author: 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Lecture: 7:30 p.m.

Carnegie Music Hall, 4400 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Tiffany Tupper by email at tiffany@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7048.

With the recent pull-out of American troops from Iraq, debate rages on the importance of U.S. military intervention abroad and all eyes have turned to the conflict in Afghanistan which, in 2010 became the second longest continuous U.S. military conflict. While politicians discuss the pros and cons of sending troops abroad, the personal experience of war can often get lost. What is this war like and what effect is it having on the American men and women risking their lives? 

The World Affairs Council has partnered with Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures to welcome award-winning journalist and best-selling author Sebastian Junger to the Literary Evenings podium, where he’ll discuss WAR, a powerful on-the-ground account of combat, fear, and survival in the trenches of Afghanistan. Mr. Junger’s lecture will be followed by an audience Q&A as well as a book signing in the Carnegie Music Hall Foyer.


Click here to read Sebastian Junger's recent "We’re all guilty of dehumanizing the enemy" Op Ed article in the Washington Post.

Sebastian Junger is an internationally acclaimed, best-selling author of The Perfect Storm, A Death in Belmont and Fire. A contributing editor to Vanity Fair and ABC News, he has covered major international news stories in Liberia, Sierra Leone and other places around the globe. He has been awarded the National Magazine Award and an SAIS Novartis Prize for Journalism. Junger and photojournalist Tim Hetherington embedded for over a year with battle company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, in the remote and heavily contested Korengal valley of eastern Afghanistan. Reporting on the war from the soldiers’ perspective, Mr. Junger spent weeks at a time at a remote outpost that saw more combat than almost anywhere else in the entire country. The professional result was his book titled WAR and a 96-minute documentary Restrepo that won the 2010 Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Mr. Junger is a native New Englander and a graduate of Wesleyan University.

Costs
General: $20 | Students: $10

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 24, 2012 will be charged.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Tiffany Tupper by email at tiffany@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7048.

With support from Wesleyan University

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Jendayi Frazer Distinguished Public Service Professor, Carnegie Mellon University Adjunct Senior Fellow for African Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Political Salon
A Question of Citizenship: Voting Rights and Electoral Challenges in Africa and the United States

Amb. Jendayi E. Frazer, Ph.D.
Distinguished Public Service Professor and Director
Center for International Policy and Innovation, Carnegie Mellon University
Former U.S. Ambassador to South Africa

January 24, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage Theater, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Allyce Pinchback at 412.224.4092.

Last year was a tumultuous one for African politics. A referendum in Sudan led to the birth of the world’s newest nation. Political stalemate in Cote D’Ivoire brought the country to the brink of civil war. Revolutions saw regime change in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya. Yet despite progress in some countries, much of Africa continues to be hobbled by weak institutions, violence, and widespread corruption.

With 20 African countries scheduled to hold elections in 2012, and the U.S. beginning its own election year, the time is auspicious to discuss voting rights at home and abroad. While an established democracy today, just a few generations ago large swathes of the U.S. population were excluded from the ballot box. Recent discussions about gerrymandering and ID requirements have reinvigorated the debate on voter accessibility at home. What are the challenges involved in fostering free and fair elections? How can the United States encourage democratic reforms and progress in Africa?

Amb. Jendayi E. Frazer is Distinguished Public Service Professor and Director of the Center for International Policy and Innovation at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). She is also Adjunct Senior Fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.Previously, Amb. Frazer served as the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs from and as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for African Affairs at the National Security Council. In 2004, she became the first woman U.S. Ambassador to South Africa. Amb. Frazer was instrumental in establishing the Bush Administration’s signature initiatives, including the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Millennium Challenge Account. She is widely credited for designing the administration’s policies for ending the wars in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Burundi, and for helping resolve Kenya’s 2007 post-election crisis. In recognition of her contributions, Condoleezza Rice presented Amb. Frazer with the Distinguished Service Award, and in July 2010 Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf awarded Amb. Frazer with the distinction of Dame Grand Commander in the Humane Order of African Redemption in recognition of her contribution to restoring peace and democracy to Liberia.

Costs
$15 Members | $25 Non-Members
Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after January 20, 2012 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Allyce Pinchback at 412.224.4092.

With thanks to the Bricolage Theater for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Blindsided? Washington¯s Response to the Arab Spring
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Blindsided? Washington’s Response to the Arab Spring

Ambassador Cynthia P. Schneider, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy
Georgetown University

February 10, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 300 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

The United States has struggled to promote democracy and stability and also manage its interests in the Middle East for decades. However, such interests sometimes compete, making it difficult to assess the real strength of the United States’ negotiating skills. In the case of the Arab Spring, many analysts say that the United States was surprised by Arab citizens' calls for freedom and democracy. Can the United States better predict when such uprisings will occur? If so, how should the United States apply its soft and hard power to leverage such crises? Join Ambassador Cynthia P. Schneider for a discussion of Washington’s initial reactions and future responses to the changing Middle East. 

Ambassador Cynthia P. Schneider teaches, publishes, and organizes initiatives in the field of cultural diplomacy, with a focus on relations with the Muslim world. She co-directs Los Angeles-based MOST Resource (Muslims on Screen and Television), which provides valuable resources and accurate information on Islam and Muslims for the U.S. entertainment community, and brings together policy leaders with their counterparts in media and entertainment. For the Brookings Institution, she leads the Arts and Culture Dialogue Initiative within the Saban Center for Middle East Policy. Amb. Schneider teaches courses in Diplomacy and Culture in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University where she was a member of the faculty from 1984-2005.

Amb. Schneider publishes and speaks frequently on topics related to arts, culture, and media and international affairs, particularly the Muslim world. Her writings range from blogs for the Huffington Post and CNN.com to policy papers for the Brookings Institution. Her talks include a TED presentation on the global impact of “American Idol,” as well as speeches on the role of arts and culture in the U.S.–Islamic world relationship in venues from Kurdistan to Cairo. From 1998-2001, she served as U.S. Ambassador to the Netherlands, during which time she led initiatives in cultural diplomacy, biotechnology, cyber security, and education. In 2001, she was awarded the Office of the Secretary of Defense Exceptional Public Service Award (highest civilian award given by Pentagon, in recognition of support for the U.S. military during ambassadorship). Amb. Schneider received her B.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 8, 2012 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Breakfast Briefing
Breakfast Briefing
New Opportunities for the Franco-American Partnership and for the Transatlantic Relationship

Ambassador François Delattre
Ambassador of France to the United States

January 18, 2012

7:30 - 9:00 a.m.

University Club, First Floor Ballroom, 123 University Place, Pittsburgh

Due to strong interest, we have reached capacity for this event. To be added to the waiting list, please email Melanie Gulasy at melanie@worldpittsburgh.org.

Observers are keenly watching Europe where seemingly tectonic political and economic shifts are taking place. The recent agreement on December 9, 2011 to sign an intergovernmental treaty that would require nations in the European Union to enforce stricter fiscal and financial discipline in their future budgets has created new alliances and alienated Britain, a historically crucial member of the EU. The loss could mean a complete restructuring of the EU. As the world looks on to see what will happen, France and Germany have emerged as two of the steadier and more stringent member states pushing the reforms. In the midst of this regional political and economic turmoil, France is entering a year of elections with the presidential elections in May 2012  and the legislative elections in June.

What do the changes in Europe mean for relations with the United States?  What will happen to the EU if Britain decides to separate? Join us for a discussion ranging from the ongoing global economic crisis to the current Franco-German relationship and what this may mean for the United States.
Ambassador François Delattre was appointed Ambassador of France to the United States in February 2011 after serving as Ambassador of France to Canada (2008-2011), Consul General in New York, and Press and Communications Director at the French Embassy in Washington, DC. A member of President Jacques Chirac’s foreign policy team, Ambassador Delattre was responsible for European and transatlantic defense and security matters and managing the Bosnian crisis. He also served as Deputy Director of the French Foreign Minister’s Office and was a member of Foreign Minister Alain Juppé’s cabinet following two years with the Strategic, Security and Disarmament Department of the French Foreign Ministry.  From 1989-1991 Ambassador Delattre was posted at the French Embassy in Germany where he was in charge of matters pertaining to the economic impact of Germany’s unification and the environment.

This event is free of charge. Space is limited. Participants must register by January 11, 2012 to attend. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Due to strong interest, we have reached capacity for this event. To be added to the waiting list, please email Melanie Gulasy at melanie@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

National Security Briefing  for Teachers
National Security Briefing for Teachers
Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security

February 14, 2012

Registration: 8:00 a.m.
Program: 8:30 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Despite the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Iraq and the death of Osama bin Laden, viable security threats still remain. With the ongoing upheaval in the Middle East, the continuing conflict in Afghanistan, and the unpredictability of Iran and Pakistan, the United States faces a multitude of national security challenges.

How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s future foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy and social unrest?

Learn about pressing international security issues facing the U.S. from military officers at the U.S. Army War College who have first-hand experience of military operations and strategy at home and abroad.

ACT 48 hours (5) will be available (pending approval).

There is NO CHARGE for this workshop. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Please register by February 6, 2012. Confirmation materials will be sent prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Allyce Pinchback at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-224-4092 or by email at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Regional Seminar
Regional Seminar for Students
Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security

Hempfield Area Senior H.S.

Panelists from the United States Army War College

February 16, 2012

9:30 – 11:00 a.m.
Panel Discussion

Hempfield Area Senior H.S., Greensburg, PA

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security.

Despite the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Iraq and the death of Osama bin Laden, viable security threats still remain. With the ongoing upheaval in the Middle East, the continuing conflict in Afghanistan, and the unpredictability of Iran and Pakistan, the United States faces a multitude of national security challenges.

How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s future foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy and social unrest?

Learn about pressing international security issues facing the U.S. from military officers at the U.S. Army War College who have first-hand experience of military operations and strategy at home and abroad.

There is NO CHARGE for the Regional Seminar. Please note: Lunch is not included as part of the Seminar.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 6, 2012.

Confirmation materials will be sent prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Allyce Pinchback at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-224-4092 or by email at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

regional seminar
Regional Seminar for Students
Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security

Mt. Lebanon H.S.

Panelists from the United States Army War College

February 15, 2012

9:30 a.m. – 1:40 p.m.
Panel Presentation and Breakout Group Discussions
Optional De-Briefing from 1:45-2:10 p.m.

Mt. Lebanon H.S., Pittsburgh, PA

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security.

Despite the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Iraq and the death of Osama bin Laden, viable security threats still remain. With the ongoing upheaval in the Middle East, the continuing conflict in Afghanistan, and the unpredictability of Iran and Pakistan, the United States faces a multitude of national security challenges.

How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s future foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy and social unrest?

Learn about pressing international security issues facing the U.S. from military officers at the U.S. Army War College who have first-hand experience of military operations and strategy at home and abroad.

There is NO CHARGE for the Regional Seminar. Please note: Lunch is not included as part of the Seminar. Students must bring their lunches.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 6, 2012.

Confirmation materials will be sent prior to the event.

Questions?
This event has reached capacity and is closed. If your school wants to be waitlisted, please contact Allyce Pinchback at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-224-4092 or by email at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Regional Seminar for Students
Regional Seminar for Students
Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security

South Side Area H.S and Grove City College

Panelists from the United States Army War College

February 13, 2012

This seminar will be held at two locations:

9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
South Side Area H.S., Hookstown, PA
Panel Discussion

10:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Grove City College, Grove City, PA
Panel Discussion

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and the U.S. Army War College present a regional seminar for students: Tackling Global Threats: Challenges Facing National Security.

Despite the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Iraq and the death of Osama bin Laden, viable security threats still remain. With the ongoing upheaval in the Middle East, the continuing conflict in Afghanistan, and the unpredictability of Iran and Pakistan, the United States faces a multitude of national security challenges.

How will the U.S. strengthen existing alliances and forge new partnerships in an effort to remain secure? What are the implications of these security threats for America’s future foreign policy decisions? How will the U.S. balance national security priorities with the domestic agenda amidst a recovering economy and social unrest?

Learn about pressing international security issues facing the U.S. from military officers at the U.S. Army War College who have first-hand experience of military operations and strategy at home and abroad.

There is no charge for the Regional Seminar. Please note: Lunch is not included as part of the South Side Area High School Seminar.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by February 6, 2012.

Click here to register online for the South Side Area H.S. program.

Click here to register online for the Grove City College program.

Confirmation materials will be sent prior to the event.

Questions?
Please contact Allyce Pinchback at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh by phone at 412-224-4092 or by email at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Academic WorldQuest
Academic WorldQuest

10th Annual International Knowledge Competition for High School Students

February 3, 2012

Registration: 9:00-9:30 a.m.
Program: 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Lunch will be provided

Soldiers and Sailors National Military Museum and Memorial, Oakland

In cooperation with the International Business Center Katz Graduate School of Business University of Pittsburgh

Academic WorldQuest is an annual knowledge-based competition with questions focusing on international affairs, current events, the global economy, geography, world history, and general knowledge about the world.

WHO CAN PLAY?
This is a team competition. Teams consist of four high school students from the same school. In order to allow for as many schools as possible to participate, only one team per school district is permitted to enter the competition.

This event is offered at NO CHARGE and is open to teams of high school students and their accompanying teachers or chaperones.

WHAT TOPICS WILL BE COVERED?

  • Round 1: World Cultures
  • Round 2: Geography
  • Round 3: Flags
  • Round 4: The World in the 1990s
  • Round 5: Global Economy and Business
  • Round 6: People in the News
  • Round 7: Current Events
  • Round 8: Global Health
  • Round 9: Middle East

HOW CAN TEAMS PREPARE?
The Council provides a preparation guide for the competition. This guide explains the content of each round and provides suggested websites and resources to help teams prepare for the competition. Click here to download the guide. Click here to download the competition description and rules guide.

In addition, the Council will provide at least two practice questions (and answers) per week on Facebook and Twitter. Become a fan of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @WorldPittsburgh for access to these special practice questions!

WHAT IS THE GRAND PRIZE?
The 1st place team will advance to the National Academic WorldQuest competition to be held in Washington, DC on April 21, 2012, sponsored by the World Affairs Councils of America. Participants at the national competition will enjoy a weekend of exciting activities and a discussion with a prominent speaker. These events, as well as transportation and hotel costs, will be covered for the winning team and one teacher sponsor or chaperone.

There will also be awards for 2nd and 3rd place teams.All competition participants will receive t-shirts

HOW DO TEAMS REGISTER?
Registration for this event is now closed. If you have questions, or are interested in registering a team, please contact Christina Unger at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at (412)281-7027 or christina@worldpittsburgh.org.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

REDEFINING SECURITY? ISRAEL, COUNTERTERRORISM, AND THE ARAB AWAKENING
Political Salon
Redefining Security?
Israel, Counterterrorism, and the Arab Awakening

Dr. Daniel Byman
Professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service
and Research Director of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution

January 18, 2012

6:00-8:00 p.m.

SPACE Gallery, 812 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Terrorism poses significant challenges for policymakers and militaries around the world. Counterterrorism efforts require high levels of intelligence, communication, and strategic flexibility, making the likelihood of success contingent upon employing new and innovative countermeasures. After decades of defending itself against Lebanese Hezbollah, Palestinian Fatah and Hamas, and domestic militant factions, Israel has become a formidable expert on fighting terrorism through bold – albeit sometimes controversial and even erroneous – strategies. How can other nations learn from the successes and failures of Israel’s counterterrorism tactics? Is there a way for Israel to mitigate the high costs that these tactics impose on Israeli intelligence and politics?

Join Daniel Byman for a discussion of Israel’s historic struggle against terrorism and how the Israeli model can serve as an example for countries around the world. In addition to Dr. Byman’s talk, attendees will have an opportunity to view Out of Rubble, presenting international artists who consider war’s causes and consequences, its finality and future, moving from decimation and disintegration to the possibilities of regeneration and recovery.

Daniel Byman is a Professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and the Research Director of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Byman has served as a Professional Staff Member with both the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks on the United States (“The 9/11 Commission”) and the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. He has also worked as the Research Director of the Center for Middle East Public Policy at the RAND Corporation and as an analyst for the U.S. intelligence community. His recent books include The Five Front War:  A Better Way to Fight Global Jihad (Wiley, 2008); Things Fall Apart: Containing the Spillover from an Iraqi Civil War (Brookings, 2007; co-authored with Kenneth Pollack); and Deadly Connections: States that Sponsor Terrorism (Cambridge University Press, 2005). His latest book is A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism (Oxford, 2011).

Costs
Council Members: $15 | Non-Members: $25
Food and beverages included.

Attendees may visit the exhibit Out of Rubble beginning at 6:00 pm

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after January 13, 2012 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With thanks to SPACE Gallery for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The United States - Canada Energy Relationship: Why you Should Care

Dale Eisler
Assistant Deputy Minister
Task Force on Energy, Security, Prosperity, and Sustainability, Natural Resources Canada

January 5, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With a highly integrated energy infrastructure - including pipeline networks and energy grids - Canadians and Americans share the closest energy relationship in the world. Canada, the world’s sixth largest oil producer, currently accounts for 13% of total U.S. oil consumption and supplies 87% of U.S. natural gas imports. At the same time, the United States and Canada share the same air, water, and natural resources. Agreements like the 2009 “Clean Energy Dialogue” demonstrate common interests in developing clean energy technologies.

In light of current debates about shale gas, new oil pipelines, and sustainability, there has never been a better time to discuss cross-border energy cooperation in North America and the potential impact it may have on the Western Pennsylvania region. How can the United States and Canada work together to develop cooperative policies that enhance North American energy security?

Dale Eisler was appointed Assistant Deputy Minister of the Task Force on Energy Security, Prosperity, and Sustainability at Natural Resources Canada in September 2011. Mr. Eisler brings considerable experience in trade, investment, communications, and external engagement to the role. Prior to this appointment, he served as Consul General of Canada in Denver, CO, Assistant Secretary to Cabinet in the Privy Council Office, and Assistant Deputy Minister of Consultations and Communications in the Department of Finance. Before joining the federal government, Mr. Eisler had an extensive career in journalism and was a sessional lecturer in journalism at the University of Regina. He is the author of three books and has been involved, at an ownership level, in private business for 13 years.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after January 3, 2012 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

With support from the Consulate General of Canada.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Register Now!

THE MOST DISPUTED AREA OF IRAQ: U.S. OBJECTIVES IN KIRKUK
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The Most Disputed Area of Iraq: United States Objectives in Kirkuk

Thomas K. Yazdgerdi
Principal Officer, U.S. Consulate Kirkuk

December 22, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

This past October, President Barack Obama announced the withdrawal of all U.S. combat troops from Iraq by December 31, 2011. While some rejoiced at the news, many residents in Kirkuk greeted the announcement with trepidation. Kirkuk, home to significant oil reserves, is a divided city and province that is disputed among its Kurdish, Arab and Turkmen inhabitants. Terrorists have sought to exploit divisions among these communities, and the lack of a unified security force has led to instability.  

For many, solving the divisions in  Kirkuk are intrinsic to Iraq’s security. As the U.S. troops begin to withdraw, what are the United States’ objectives in Kirkuk? How can the U.S. help support stability in the region, and in Iraq as a whole?

Thomas K. Yazdgerdi entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1991 and is currently Principal Officer of the U.S. Diplomatic Presence Office in Kirkuk, Iraq. Previously, he served as Deputy Political Counselor for Iran Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. He also served as Deputy Chief of Mission and Political-Economic Chief at the U.S. Embassy in Pristina, Kosovo in the run-up to and aftermath of Kosovo independence. His other assignments include Panama, Bratislava, Tirana, and Athens, as well as positions in the European Bureau (Czech Desk) and the Political-Military Affairs (PM) Bureau at the State Department, and as Senior Balkans Program Officer with the National Democratic Institute in Washington. 

Before joining the Foreign Service, Mr. Yazdgerdi worked as Legislative Assistant for Foreign Affairs and Defense issues to Congressman William O. Lipinski (D‐IL).

Registration
This event is free of charge. This event is by invitation only.

To register, please email Caitlin Berczik at caitlin@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-1259. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions. 

Click here to download PDF flier.

 

New Trends in Asia
Political Salon
New Trends in Asia

Dr. Stephen Noerper
Senior Vice President
Korea Society

Dr. Michael G. Kulma
Executive Director of Global Leadership Initiatives
Asia Society

Nikita Desai
Assistant Director of Policy
Korea Society

December 1, 2011

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Fairmont Hotel, Ballroom, 510 Market Street, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412-281-1259.

Asia is hot. The United States has pivoted toward Asia, and China looms as America's rival for global leadership. President Obama has just returned from a monumentally important trip to the region, where he defined the U.S. as a Pacific Nation, and Secretary of State Clinton is in Korea and Burma this week, underscoring U.S. commitment to development and democratic opening. Join three of the nation's top new generation voices on Asia for a discussion about New Trends in Asia.

Dr. Stephen Noerper is a leading Asia analyst and The Korea Society Senior Vice President. He served with the EastWest Institute, New York University, Intellibridge, U.S. State Department, and Nautilus Institute. He was a professor at American University, Waseda University, the National University of Mongolia, and Hawaii's Asia Pacific Center. Dr. Noerper was a visiting fellow at the East-West Center, Korea's Institute for Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS), and the Edward R. Murrow Center. He is the author of more than 60 publications on Asia and has appeared on NPR, NBC, in Newsweek, and in other print and electronic media.

Dr. Michael G. Kulma is the Executive Director of Global Leadership Initiatives at the Asia Society. He began his career with the Asia Society in 2000 working on policy issues related to Northeast Asia and China. Previously, he lectured several colleges in the New York City area, focusing on East Asian politics, foreign policy, and international relations. Michael contributes regularly to print and broadcast media on Asia-focused issues. He was a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is a member of The National Committee on United States-China Relations. 

Nikita Desai is Assistant Director of Policy at The Korea Society.  Previously, Ms. Desai was a Senior Program Officer at the Asia Society and a Research Associate at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies. She served in the Peace Corps Mongolia as a Teacher Trainer and Community Youth Development Volunteer and returned in 2006 as an Anti-trafficking Consultant for the Asia Foundation in Mongolia.

Slides of works from the exhibition “Social Graphics: the Art of Jeski (Jeseok Yi)” will be on display in the reception area.

This event is free of charge thanks to the generosity of The Korea Society, Korea Foundation, and Pantech.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 29, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412-281-1259.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

THE SEARCH FOR LEGITIMACY IN GOVERNMENT:  CONCEPTUALIZING CHANGE FROM CAIRO TO WALL STREET
Political Salon
The Search for Legitimacy in Government: Conceptualizing Change from Cairo to Wall Street

Dr. Jack A. Goldstone
Virginia E. and John T. Hazel, Jr. Professor and Director of the Center for Global Policy 
George Mason University School of Public Policy

November 17, 2011

6:00-8:00 p.m.
Attendees may visit the exhibit Sites of Passage beginning at 5:30 p.m.

The Mattress Factory, 500 Sampsonia Way, Pittsburgh

In December 2010, the first citizen demonstrations began taking place against autocratic state leaders in the Arab world. Nearly a year later, these uprisings have spread across much of the Middle East and North Africa. This year’s World Affairs Institute, The Arab Awakening: A Call for Change in the Middle East and Implications for U.S. Foreign Policy, will examine the catalysts for these events, and will look at the short and long-term implications for American foreign policy in this vital region of the world. In conjunction with the Institute, the World Affairs Council with host a discussion with Dr. Jack A. Goldstone concerning the Arab Awakening and current foreign policy considerations for the United States. In addition to Dr. Goldstone’s talk, attendees will have an opportunity to view Sites of Passage, an exhibit featuring the work of Egyptian and American artists, much of which centers on the recent revolts in Egypt.
 
Dr. Jack A. Goldstone is the Hazel Professor of Public Policy and a Fellow of the Mercatus Center of George Mason University. He recently led a National Academy of Sciences study of USAID democracy assistance, and worked with USAID, DIFD, and the U.S. State and Defense Departments on developing their operations in fragile states. Goldstone’s current research focuses on conditions for building democracy and stability in developing nations, the impact of population change on the global economy and international security, and the cultural origins of modern economic growth. Goldstone has authored or edited ten books and published over one hundred articles in books and scholarly journals. His latest books are Why Europe? The Rise of the West 1500-1850 and Political Demography: How Population Changes are Reshaping International Security and National Politics.

Program Costs
There is a $15 charge for members of either the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh or the Mattress Factory. There is a $25 charge for non-members of either organization.

Food and beverages included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 15, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Tiffany Tupper at 412-281-7048.

With thanks to the Mattress Factory for supporting this event.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador Paula J. Dobriansky
80th Anniversary Speaker Series
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Challenges and Opportunities for U.S. Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Ambassador Paula Dobriansky
Senior Vice President and Global Head of Government Regulator Affairs, Thomson Reuters
Chairwoman of World Affairs Council of America

December 12, 2011

12:15-2:00 p.m.

Omni William Penn Hotel, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Carly Reed at 412-281-7055.

The United States faces a new era of foreign policy challenges. After a century of dominance, some pundits argue that the United States’ power is waning, while others contend that the U.S. still remains the dominant power. The global landscape is in a state of flux. The Arab Spring has made the future of the Middle East more complex and uncertain. At the same time, emerging economies like have led to the dispersal of economic power. How can the United States remain competitive in a multi-polar world? Join us for a discussion on how U.S. foreign policy can navigate the challenges-and take advantages of the opportunities-of the new global era.   

Ambassador Paula J. Dobriansky is currently Senior Vice President and Global Head of Government and Regulatory Affairs at Thomson Reuters, an adjunct senior fellow at Harvard University's JFK Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and holds the Distinguished National Security Chair at the U.S. Naval Academy. From 2001-2009, Amb. Dobriansky served as Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs. She was appointed the President's Special Envoy on Northern Ireland and received the Secretary of State's Distinguished Service Medal for her work. Amb. Dobriansky also served as Senior Vice President and Director of the Washington office of the Council on Foreign Relations. She holds a B.S.F.S. in International Politics from Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Soviet political/military affairs from Harvard University. On June 27, 2011, Amb. Dobriansky was elected as the new National Chair of the Board of Directors of the World Affairs Councils of America.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after December 8, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Carly Reed at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

International Happy Hour
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Global Solutions Pittsburgh to host International Happy Hour

November 10, 2011

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Rock Bottom Brewery, 171 E. Bridge St., Pittsburgh

The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and Global Solutions are hosting an international happy hour to connect all the different organizations and individuals in Pittsburgh that work on international issues and causes.

Come join us at Rock Bottom Brewery (Waterfront) to learn more about global and local issues affecting the Pittsburgh area, as well as the organizations that deal with them!

The International Happy Hour will feature representatives from:

  • Global Solutions Pittsburgh
  • World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
  • Pittsburgh Human Rights Network
  • Pittsburgh Darfur Emergency Coalition
  • Institute for Global Labour and Human Rights
  • Amizade Global Service-Learning
  • One Campaign Pittsburgh

There will also be drink specials on hand for the evening!

  • $4 well drinks
  • $2 off beer
  • $2 off wine
  • $6 specialty cocktails

Plus happy hour discounts on food!

This event is for those 18 and over.

Click here for more information.

 

International Student Summit: Crisis and Famine in the Horn of Africa : How Should the World Respond?
International Student Summit Crisis and Famine in the Horn of Africa: How Should the World Respond?

December 8, 2011

9:00 a.m - 1:15 p.m. (EST)

Baldwin High School (4653 Clairton Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA 15236) and Global Video Conference

An archive of today's video will be available next week.

Students from Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and schools around the world will convene for a one-day summit to focus on the escalating crisis in the Horn of Africa, where severe and prolonged drought has affected 11 million people across Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Djibouti.

Bearing the brunt of this crisis is Somalia, which has been without a functioning central government for two decades. The vast majority of the country’s nine million people live in poverty, without food, water, or political security. In August of 2011, the United Nations declared a state of famine in two southern regions of Somalia, the first time in 20 years the UN has issued such an official declaration.

The International Student Summit will include an expert panel discussion followed by a simulation of an emergency meeting of transnational organizations convened to address this crisis. The participants will examine various aspects of this humanitarian crisis, including strategies to deliver immediate aid to those most affected by the famine; regional and global security threats arising from this crisis; mass population displacement and migration; and how to raise public awareness of the crisis.

The Student Summit provides students with an opportunity to work creatively and collaboratively with their peers from across the state and around the globe. Students will develop core knowledge and skills needed to thrive in our interdependent global community.

Participation at Baldwin High School (registration closed)
Baldwin High School can accommodate up to 150 student participants from throughout the Pittsburgh region. Capacity has been reached. Please contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org to be placed on the waiting list.

Participation via Video Conference (registration closed)
A limited number of schools will participate via video conference. Schools in the Pittsburgh region will be paired with other local schools or international sites during the breakout session and will report back during the debriefing session. Video conference equipment is required.  

Participation via Webcast
A live webcast of the event will be available through the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh website. An archive of today's video will be available next week.

Tentative Schedule (EST)

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.      
Panel Presentation

10:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.     
Breakout Session 

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Debriefing Session

Registration
Registration is open to students in grades 9-12.

Student Preparation
A preparation guide will be available on the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh website prior to the event to stimulate student thinking about the crisis in the Horn of Africa.
 
Questions?
Please contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org or call 412-281-7970.

Thank you to our host and partners!
World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh
World Affairs Council of Philadelphia
Baldwin-Whitehall School District
Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3
AlleghenyCONNECT


Special thanks to: MAGPI

 

Register Now!

PMEI
Pittsburgh Middle East Institute
The 2011 Business Conference and Webcast

October 26, 2011

8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

The Fairmont Hotel, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15222

Keynotes by:
His Royal Highness Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud of Saudi Arabia

Her Excellency Dr. Rawya Al Busaidi, Minister of Higher Education, Oman
Introduction by: Her Excellency Ambassador Hunaina Al-Mughairy, Ambassador to the United States from Oman

Conference Panel Discussions On:

  • Oman: Discovering the Land of Progress
  • Opportunity Oman: Doing Business in the Sultanate
  • Fueling the Future: Energy Solutions in Action
  • Kingdom of Opportunity:  Doing Business in Saudi Arabia

Confirmed Speakers Include:

  •  His Royal Highness Prince Turki Al Faisal bin Abdul Aziz Al Sa'ud of Saudi Arabia
  • Her Excellency Dr. Rawya Al Busaidi, Minister of Higher Education, Oman
  • Sultan Hamdoon Al Harthi, Mayor of Muscat; Chairman of the Board of OMANTEL
  • HE Ambassador Hunaina Al-Mughairy, Ambassador to U.S. from Oman; Chair, Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center's Oversight Board
  • Ambassador Elizabeth McKune, Executive Director, Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center
  • Jamal Al Kishi, Chief Country Officer & Head of Corporate and Investment Banking for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Deutsche Bank
  • Dr. Amer bin Awadh Al-Rawas, Chief Executive Officer,Oman Telecommunications Company (Omantel)
  • Dr. Khalfan Al Barwani, Economist, Central Bank of Oman
  • Dr. Iman bint Said bin Khalifa Al Busaidiya, Deputy Executive Director

Tickets are $200.00, plus handling. For more information regarding the Business Conference, please contact the Pittsburgh Middle East Institute at info@pittsburghmideastinstitute.org.

Interactive Webcast

This event will be webcast by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Use this link to watch the live webcast. Online viewers will be able to submit questions during the Q & A period.

Webcast Ready?
To make sure you will be able to view this program, please test the computer you will view the program on. For more information about preparing for viewing the webcast, click here.

Evening Keynote Lecture by Dr. Kissinger
With an Introduction by former U.S. Treasury Secretary, the Honorable Paul H. O’Neill

Gala Sponsors Dinner 6:30 p.m.
Lecture 8:00 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall

Tickets to the Kissinger Lecture are on sale now.  Prices are $60 for the first floor, $40 for the first balcony, and $20 for the second balcony (plus handling fees).   

For more information, please contact the Pittsburgh Middle East Institute at info@pittsburghmideastinstitute.org.

 

On The Brink? Pakistan and Militant Islam
Breakfast Briefing
On the Brink? Pakistan and Militant Islam

John R. Schmidt
Professional Lecturer on Pakistan and South Asia at
Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University
Author of The Unraveling: Pakistan in the Age of Jihad

November 11, 2011

8:15-9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, 4th Floor, Pittsburgh, PA

The relationship between Pakistan and the United States has undergone significant stress over the last decade. While Pakistan allied itself with the United States against the Afghan Taliban following 9/11, a number of developments have caused the United States to question the loyalty of its Pakistani allies. Internal conflicts between the Pakistani military and jihadist groups have caused instability and divided the country, causing concern over covert support for militant organizations among Pakistan’s officials. The discovery of Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden hiding in plain sight in Abottabad, Pakistan, has only compounded these concerns. Can Pakistan reign in the destabilizing forces that cost the country both domestic security and international support? What can be done to bring Pakistan back from the brink? Join John R. Schmidt as he discusses militant Islam in Pakistan and South Asia.

John R. Schmidt is a professorial lecturer at the Elliott School of International Affairs, where he teaches courses on “Pakistan and the Radical Islamic Threat” and “Politics and Conflict in South Asia.” During a 30-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, he served in senior positions at the Department of State and National Security Council, including as Political Counselor at the U.S. embassy in Islamabad in the three years leading up to 9/11. In addition to his expertise on Pakistan and South Asia, Mr. Schmidt is one of the leading U.S. experts on NATO and the conflict in the Balkans. He has written extensively for leading foreign policy journals and online news magazines including The National Interest, The Washington Quarterly, and The American Interest. The Unraveling: Pakistan in the Age of Jihad, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, is John Schmidt’s first book.

There is no charge for World Affairs Council members, and a $25 charge for non-members

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after November 9, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

International Youth Forums on Education, Security, and the Economy
International Youth Forums on Education, Security, and the Economy

To Build International Understanding

October 11, 2011

Interactive Webcast

Students today will enter a global workforce, and they need the tools and skills necessary to be successful in an evolving environment. One of the skills required for an increasingly multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multilingual labor market is cross-cultural communication, which will enable students to interact with their peers across boundaries. In an effort to provide opportunities for representatives from the “successor generation” to develop and hone these skills, they need to engage each other in a frank and open discussion of the important issues of the day.

During this series of Youth Forums, held in collaboration with schools in the U.S. and schools across the Atlantic, experts on both sides of the Atlantic will moderate, and select groups of students will provide their perspective during presentations on education, security, and the economy. The presentations will be followed by substantive discussion. Preparation materials and a wiki site will be provided to engage students before and after the forums

Kickoff Event: A Transatlantic Student Dialogue
October 11, 2011
8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. EDT (Connection time: 7:30 a.m. EDT)

Examining Education: A Transatlantic Student Dialogue
November 1, 2011
8:00 a.m.– 9:30 a.m. EDT (Connection time: 7:30 a.m. EDT)

National and Global Security: A Transatlantic Student Dialogue
December 13, 2011
8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. EST (Connection time: 7:30 a.m. EST)

Exploring Economy: A Transatlantic Student Dialogue
January 2012 (Date TBA)
8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. EST (Connection time: 7:30 a.m. EST)

Target Audience: Students in grades 10-12.

Registration: There are 3 spots available to MAGPI members or schools in the Pittsburgh region to join as discussants via video conference or webcast for each forum

Cost: Free

Questions and Registration Inquiries: Contact Amiena Mahsoob at the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh amiena@worldpittsburgh.org

This program is brought to you by: The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, MAGPI, Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3, AlleghenyCONNECT 

 

Succeeding in the Age of Globalization: A Hispanic Perspective
Regional Seminar for Students in Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month
Succeeding in the Age of Globalization: A Hispanic Perspective

October 27, 2011

Registration: 8:30 a.m.
Panel Discussion and Q&A Session: 9:00 a.m. —10:30 a.m.
Breakout Presentations: 10:45 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

Upper St. Clair High School, 1825 McLaughlin Run Road, Upper St. Clair, PA 15241

Presented in partnership with Upper St. Clair High School, the Hispanic Employment Program Committee of the Federal Executive Board (OPM), and the Office of Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato.

What are the implications of an increasingly globalized workforce for today’s students?

What skills do students need to be successful in a global marketplace?

What can we learn from Pittsburgh’s Hispanic community about global competiveness and cross-cultural communication?

According to the recent Census, between 2000 and 2010 the Hispanic population in the United States grew by 43 percent and now accounts for more than half of the total U.S. population growth. In Pennsylvania alone, the Hispanic population has increased by 82.6 percent in the past ten years. As a result, students today will enter an increasingly global and diverse workforce where the need for employees who can speak world  languages and can collaborate cross-culturally is imperative.

Members of the Hispanic community continue to break down barriers and assume leadership roles in government, business, academia, and healthcare. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, join us as we highlight these achievements, and as we discuss global competitiveness, workforce development, and cross-cultural communication with prominent members of Pittsburgh’s Hispanic community. 

*Several breakout sessions will be made available in Spanish for mid-upper level Spanish students.

There is no charge for this Regional Seminar. Confirmation details will be send upon registration.

Please register online or by phone at 412-281-7970 by October 21, 2011.

Questions? Contact Allyce Pinchback at allyce@worldpittsburgh.org or 412-224-4092.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

FORMER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DONALD RUMSFELD
80th Anniversary Speaker Series
A Policy Discussion and Luncheon with Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld

November 2, 2000

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Omni William Penn Hotel, William Penn Ballroom, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh

Join us for a policy discussion with the 13thand 21st  Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld. Secretary Rumsfeld will discuss his career, recent book, and the future of U.S. military engagement.

Secretary Donald Rumsfeld completed his second tour as Secretary of Defense in December 2006. A former naval aviator, Secretary Rumsfeld previously served as U.S. Congressman, U.S. Ambassador to NATO, White House Chief of Staff, Special Presidential Envoy to the Middle East, and chief executive officer of two Fortune 500 companies. Secretary Rumsfeld  was responsible for leading the Defense Department’s response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, including the military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.He currently chairs a non-profit foundation with his wife, Joyce. The Rumsfeld Foundation supports leadership and public service at home and the growth of free political and free economic systems abroad. The Rumsfeld Foundation funds microfinance projects, fellowships for graduate students interested in public service, the development of linkages between young leaders from Central Asia and the Caucasus and the United States, and charitable causes that benefit the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families.

Secretary Rumsfeld recently published the number one New York Times bestselling memoir, Known and Unknown, which spans his career and includes extensive primary documentation. The proceeds from the sales of Known and Unknown go to the military charities sponsored by the Rumsfeld Foundation. 

Come to the VIP reception from 11:00-11:45 am for a chance to meet Secretary Rumsfeld.

Program Costs

  • Member: $65 
  • Non-Member: $75
  • Table of Eight (8) $520
  • VIP Reception: $100

All prices include a signed copy of Secretary Rumsfeld’s recent memoir, Known and Unknown.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 28, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon  A New Moment: Engaging Muslim Communities at Home and Around the World
80th Anniversary Speaker Series
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
A New Moment: Engaging Muslim Communities at Home and Around the World

Farah Anwar Pandith
Special Representative to Muslim Communities
U.S. Department of State

October 20, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Heinz Hall, Mozart Room, 600 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

With an estimated population between 1.2 to 1.6 billion people, Islam is the second largest religion in the world with a rapidly growing population in the United States. Despite the prevalence of Muslims throughout the world and in the United States, misconceptions abound about the religion and its adherents. Conversely, many Muslims around the globe have a great mistrust and misunderstanding of the United States. The current administration is working hard to dispel these myths by engaging Muslim communities abroad and at home. A recent Gallop poll shows that Muslim Americans have a greatly improved sense of well-being under the leadership of President Obama. What is the current administration doing to build relationships with Muslim Communities at home and abroad?  What can be done to counter misunderstandings between the United States, and the Muslim world and what will this mean for how the U.S. is perceived overseas?

Farah Anwar Pandith is the Special Representative to Muslim Communities and reports directly to Secretary of State, Hilary Clinton.  Her office is responsible for executing Secretary Clinton’s vision for engagement with Muslims around the world on a people-to-people and organizational level.  Prior to this appointment, Ms. Pandith was Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs during which she focused on Muslim communities in Europe where she was responsible for policy oversight for integration, democracy, and Islam in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 17, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Werner Sonne Senior Correspondent, ARD German TV
Breakfast Briefing
Germany’s Long and Winding Road: From Post-War Rubble to Europe’s Economic Powerhouse

Werner Sonne
Senior Correspondent, ARD German TV

September 27, 2011

8:15-9:30 a.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, 4th Floor, Pittsburgh, PA

In partnership with The American Council on Germany

The end of World War II saw a divided Germany facing a long road ahead physically, emotionally, and economically. The country’s infrastructure was destroyed, many of its most talented citizens had been killed or displaced, and it faced tremendous distrust abroad. However, despite these hurdles, today Germany is one of the strongest countries in Europe. As one of the founding nations of the European Union, Germany has played a key role in European integration and many believe that Germany, with the largest economy in Europe, holds the key to Europe’s financial stability. How has Germany’s role on the world stage changed since the post-WW II era? What lessons can be learned from Germany’s road from divided country to international powerhouse? As the world grapples with the challenges of economic recession, environmental damage, and international terrorism, what role will Germany play in the future?

Werner Sonne is a Senior Correspondent for ARD German TV. An expert on foreign affairs, security policy, and terrorism, he is the Berlin Bureau Chief for the ARD morning news program Morgenmagazin, a position he has held since 2004. For over 40 decades, Mr. Sonne has had a career as a radio and television correspondent, covering many historic events. He worked as a foreign correspondent for eleven years on both sides of the Iron Curtain – including five years in Washington, DC. He witnessed and reported about the process of German reunification and saw the country rise to its current position as the strongest economic partner in the European Union. More recently, he has reported on the Middle East and German involvement in the Afghanistan War. Mr. Sonne is also a published author  and his novels often deal with these topics.  

There is no charge for World Affairs Council members, and a $25 charge for non-members.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 21, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Digital Cops and Robbers?  CyberCrime, CyberEspionage, and Cyber War
Political Salon
Digital Cops and Robbers?
CyberCrime, CyberEspionage, and Cyber War

Misha Glenny
Best-Selling Author and Award-Winning Journalist

October 13, 2011

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Bricolage Theater, 937 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

In a perfect world, the FBI and other law enforcement agencies would expend their efforts chasing cyber criminals, the private sector would look after the growing problem of cyber commercial espionage (the theft of commercial secrets or sabotage of competitors’ infrastructure), and the military would deal with the threats emanating from other states. Unfortunately, the very essence of the internet renders such a neat division of security responsibilities all but impossible. Two groups, in particular, migrate between these three major threats now facing us – spooks and hackers. Misha Glenny explores the cyber underworld to explain why the transformative tool of the internet—its interconnectedness—is also what makes it so dangerous.

Misha Glenny is an award winning author and journalist who has been working in Eastern and Central Europe for 20 years. A former BBC Correspondent, Mr. Glenny is also the author of four best-selling books including McMafia: Seriously Organized Crime. He has written for all major British and European newspapers and is a regular contributor to the New York Times, the New York Review of Books, and the New Yorker. Mr. Glenny is a distinguished Fulbright scholar, a former fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, and previously worked as a visiting research professor at the London School of Economics. In January 2012, Mr. Glenny will be taking up a post as Visiting Professor at Columbia University’s Harriman Institute. He is the Founding Director of SEE Change, an NGO which completed a two-year project developing cross-border cooperation between multi-ethnic municipalities in Kosovo, Serbia and Macedonia. This fall, Mr. Glenny will publish his latest book DarkMarket: Cyberthieves, Cybercops, and You which delves into the lives of criminal hackers and the law enforcement agents who tried to penetrate their networks, making the arcane world of cybercrime and cyber security both vivid and gripping.

Program Costs

$15
-World Affairs Council Members

$25
-Non-Member

Food and drinks included.

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 10, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

With thanks to Bricolage Theater and the Heinrich Böll Foundation for their support.

Online registration for this event is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Carly Reed at 412-281-7055.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

The Netherlands, the European Union, and the United States:  An Agenda for Growth in Uncertain Times
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The Netherlands, the European Union, and the United States:
An Agenda for Growth in Uncertain Times

Ambassador Reneé Jones-Bos
Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United States

February 17, 2012

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

The Dutch-American relationship marks one of today’s most enduring partnerships, dating back to the American Revolution. Both the Netherlands and the United States share a history of celebrating civil liberties and promoting cultural ties, which are cemented by the nations’ political and economic roles in organizations such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the World Trade Organization, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The Netherlands is also among the top investors in the United States - right after the United Kingdom and Japan.

In a world fraught with political, security, and economic challenges, the Netherlands and the United States serve as allies on nearly every front. Dutch soldiers have fought alongside Americans in wars including Korea and the First Gulf War, and have participated in numerous peace keeping missions including in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Netherlands also partners often with the United States in encouraging the development of globally-driven markets within the European Union. However, with the European Union in financial crisis, how can the Dutch-American relationship continue to foster economic growth? 

Ambassador Renée Jones-Bos is the 44th representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United States of America. This appointment marks a return to the United States for Ambassador Jones-Bos, where she initially served as First Secretary to the Royal Netherlands Embassy in Washington from 1987 to 1990. Ambassador Jones-Bos possesses extensive experience in diplomacy and has steadily risen through the ranks of the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Prior to her appointment to Washington, she served as the Director-General for Regional Policy and Consular Affairs and as Ambassador-at-Large for Human Rights. She also served as the Head of the Security Council Task Force of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Previous duties within the Ministry also included: Deputy Chief of Mission to the Royal Netherlands Embassy in Prague, Czech Republic; Head of Recruitment & Training; and postings in Dhaka, Bangladesh; Paramibo, Suriname; and Moscow, USSR.

Ambassador Jones-Bos holds a Masters of Arts degree in Russian Studies from the University of Sussex (U.K) and a degree in Russian and English Studies, Politics, and Economics from the University of Antwerp (Belgium).

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after February 15, 2012 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Dr. Klaus Kleinfeld Chairman and CEO, Alcoa, Inc.
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Pittsburgh: The Aluminum City in the Global Era

Dr. Klaus Kleinfeld
Chairman and CEO
Alcoa, Inc

October 5, 2011

12:15-2:00 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

As markets continue to globalize, local business is faced with the challenge of adapting to the international market. How can local business be successful in today’s economy? Alcoa, Inc., the world’s leading producer of aluminum, transformed from a local business in Pittsburgh to a company operating in over 30 countries. Join Alcoa CEO Klaus Kleinfeld for a discussion of how globalization impacts local business and find out what the local market may look like in the future . How can cities like Pittsburgh remain competitive in the global marketplace?

Dr. Klaus Kleinfeld is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Alcoa, Inc. He joined the company in 2007 as President and Chief Operating Officer, and seven months later he assumed CEO responsibilities. He has served on Alcoa's board of directors since 2003 and was named Chairman in April 2010.  Before Alcoa, Dr. Kleinfeld had a 20-year career with Siemens, where he served as Chief Executive Officer of Siemens AG starting in 2005. During his tenure at Siemens, Dr. Kleinfeld presided over a dramatic transformation of the company, reshaping the company's portfolio around three high-growth areas, resulting in an increase of revenues and a near doubling of market capitalization. In addition to serving on Alcoa's board, he is a member of the Supervisory Board of Bayer AG.

In 2009, Dr. Kleinfeld was appointed Chairman of the U.S.-Russia Business Council (USRBC), which is dedicated to promoting trade and investment between the United States and Russia. He is a member of the Brookings Institution Board of Trustees, as well as a member of the Board of Directors of the World Economic Forum USA. Dr. Kleinfeld was born in Bremen, Germany, and educated at the University of Göttingen and University of Würzburg. He holds a PhD in strategic management and a Master’s degree in business administration.  

The webcast for this event has been canceled.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 3, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Ambassador Nguyen Quoc Cuong Ambassador of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to the United States
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
A New Strategic Partnership: The Future of the Vietnam-U.S. Relationship

Ambassador Nguyen Quoc Cuong
Ambassador of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to the United States

October 7, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

The relationship between the United States and Vietnam is significant in its difficult history and promising future. After 20 years of silence, the countries established diplomatic relations in 1995. Since then, the relationship has been strengthened through trade and dialogue on key issues including human rights and technology. Located in a region of dynamic economic growth, with a population of nearly 90 million people and land rich in natural resources, Vietnam is poised to play an ever increasing role on the global stage. As both countries look to maintain a strong presence in Southeast Asia, what are the benefits of a U.S.– Vietnam partnership? How does a partnership between the countries impact the future of Southeast Asia? What does China’s rise mean for relations between the U.S. and Vietnam?  Join Ambassador Cuong for a discussion of current U.S.-Vietnam relations and what they may lead to in the next years.

H.E. Nguyen Quoc Cuong is Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to the United States of America. Mr. Cuong is a career diplomat with vast experience in foreign affairs. He was appointed by President Nguyen Minh Triet as Ambassador to the United States in early 2011. Mr. Cuong served as Deputy Foreign Minister from 2008 to 2011 and Director-General, Executive Assistant to the Deputy Prime Minister from 2007 to 2008, among other leadership positions. During his 30-year career, Mr. Nguyen Quoc Cuong was posted twice to Vietnam’s missions abroad, one as Minister Counselor, DCM at the Embassy of Vietnam in Ottawa, Canada (2002-2005) and the other as Second Secretary in Beijing, China (1990-1993). Ambassador Cuong graduated from the University of Foreign Affairs in Vietnam and earned a MA in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.   

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 3, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Electric Grid-Lock? Germany Powers Up for a Carbon-Free Future without Nuclear Energy
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Electric Grid-Lock? Germany Powers up for a Carbon-Free Future without Nuclear Energy

Matthias Kurth
President of the German Federal Network Agency for Electricity, Gas, Telecommunications, Post, and Railway (Bundesnetzagentur)

October 17, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

During the summer of 2011 the German government announced a groundbreaking plan to phase out nuclear energy over the next decade, ushering in a carbon-free future for one of the world’s most sustainable nations.  Mixing strategic planning for future fuel needs and a sound approach to strengthening the German economy, the state now favors renewable resources, higher efficiency standards, and changing both law and transportation practices to support the alternative energy supply. The government has established tax incentives to ease the transition for citizens and businesses, making carbon-free as cost-effective as possible. Does this pioneering German model provide lessons for America about how to politically and economically  commit to a greener future?  Join Matthias Kurth for a lively discussion regarding Germany’s changing energy policy, focusing on how the model could ease America’s own fuel frustrations.

Matthias Kurthis President of the German Federal Network Agency for Electricity, Gas, Telecommunications, Post and Railway (Bundesnetzagentur). Since 2000, he has worked with the Regulatory for Telecommunications and Posts in the post of Vice-President, and President since 2005. From 1994 to 1999 he served as Hessian State Secretary in the Ministry of Economics, also representing Hesse in a number of other political forums, such as to the Regulatory Council for Posts and Telecommunications, shaping the Telecommunications Act, and the Committee for the Region of the European Union. As a member of the Social Democratic Party for nearly 45 years, he has worked as a lawyer, judge, and member of the state legislature of Hesse on the Executive, Budget, and Internal Affairs committees from 1978-1994.  He studied law and economics at Frankfurt am Main University, and trained at the Hesse Justice Administration.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after October 13, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Public Policy
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Current Challenges for Fiscal and Monetary Policies

Dr. Todd Clark
Vice President
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Dr. Fritz Zurbrügg
General Director, Federal Finance Administration
Swiss Federal Ministry of Finance

September 29, 2011

12:00 - 1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

Please join the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York and the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh for a Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon.

As markets rise and fall, policy makers around the world are searching for ways to help stabilize the global economy. The ongoing crisis gripping the Euro zone, and the recent debt ceiling debate in the United States, has highlighted the extent to which the world’s economies are interlinked. With stock markets fluctuating widely, what are the challenges facing both domestic and global monetary policy? How are international policies impacting the U.S. economy?  Is the world entering another recession or can something be done to steer our markets back on track? Join Dr. Todd Clark and Dr. Fritz Zurbrügg for a discussion on the current challenges facing global fiscal and monetary policy.

Dr. Todd Clark is a Vice President at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He leads the Research Department’s Money, Financial Markets, and Monetary Policy Group. He specializes in research related to monetary policy and macroeconomics. Dr. Clark has published research on a variety of topics, including the relationship between producer and consumer prices, the measurement of inflation, forecasting methods, and the evaluation of forecasts. He also serves as an Associate Editor with the Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking.

Dr. Fritz Zurbrügg is General Director of the Federal Finance Administration in the Swiss Federal Ministry of Finance. The Federal Finance Administration is responsible for the federal budget and medium-term financial plans, the federal treasury and debt management, fiscal policy issues, and the financial equalization system for sub national governments. From 1998-2006 he represented Switzerland in the Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund as Senior Advisor and Executive Director. 

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 26, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Student Amb. Program
Student Ambassador Program
Cultural Competency and International Speaker Visits
November 2011 – May 2012

May 3, 2012

Today’s students will be tomorrow’s leaders. As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, knowledge and understanding of other cultures is becoming more essential.

The Student Ambassador Program capitalizes on middle school students’ inherent curiosity to increase their awareness, understanding, and appreciation of world cultures and global issues. By connecting schools with Pittsburgh’s global community, the program is able to enhance student’s cultural competency.

Students will broaden their knowledge of global cultures, geography, and current events around the world. This program is an excellent compliment to diversity initiatives and anti-bullying campaigns and will help engage your students in the world around them.

What is the Student Ambassador Program?
The Student Ambassador Program is a comprehensive global education program for middle schools in the Pittsburgh region. Established by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh in 2006, the Student Ambassador Program will be offered as a partnership program involving the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center as well as Global Solutions Pittsburgh in the 2011-2012 school year.

This program is for middle school students and their teachers. The program menu consists of a Teacher Workshop for middle school teachers, a school visit on Cultural Competency, an International Speaker school visit, and the culminating Student Ambassador Conference for student leaders. Participating schools are provided with an extensive resource guide and support throughout the program.

Following the program, students complete projects to share their newfound global knowledge.

Who participates in this program?
Twenty-three middle schools from Pittsburgh and surrounding areas participated in the program last year, which reached nearly 1,300 students. Social studies, gifted, world language, English, and art teachers alike can find their curricula enhanced through involvement in this program. All students, particularly those who do not usually have the opportunity to experience global cultures, will benefit from participation. Space is limited to 30 schools for the 2011-2012 school year.

How much does the program cost?
The World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center, and Global Solutions Pittsburgh believe global education is essential for all students. Therefore, this program is offered free of charge for middle schoolers and teachers in the Pittsburgh region. Schools will need to cover transportation to and from the Conference.

When is the Program?
The Student Ambassador Program runs throughout the academic year. The Teacher Workshop was held Monday, September 26, 2011. Cultural Competency visits will start in October, and International Speaker visits will run December through late April. Visits can be arranged around busy school and testing schedules.

The Program culminates in the Student Ambassador Conference on Thursday, May 3, 2012 on the University of Pittsburgh campus. Participating schools will have the option to tour the Nationality Rooms following the Conference.

Program Menu
The Student Ambassador Program is designed to be flexible and responsive to schools’ needs, therefore all menu items are available to participating schools. It is recommended that schools participate in all components of the program. However, in recognition of busy school schedules and restricted budgets, schools are able to select the components they would like to participate in. All first-time schools are required to participate in the Teacher Workshop.

Teacher Workshop (Completed)

Cultural Competency Visit (Starting in October)
During this visit to your school, students will hear from partnering organization staff who will discuss the importance of cultural competence and engage students in a number of activities to prepare them to interact in a globalized world. Students will also reflect on their own culture and deconstruct cultural stereotypes.

International Speaker Visit (December through April)
During this visit to your school, an international speaker specially chosen for your students will discuss his or her country and culture and engage students in cultural activities. Previous presentations have included music, dance, art, language, and stories from around the world. Many students comment that their previous impressions and stereotypes are transformed through this visit.

Student Ambassador Conference May 3, 2012, 9:00-11:30 a.m., University of Pittsburgh (Registration Full)
The Student Ambassador Conference is the culminating event for the program year and serves as a reward for Student Ambassadors. At the Conference, students will see a performance, hear from a keynote speaker, and have the opportunity to attend breakout sessions with international speakers who will engage students in a cultural learning exercise or activity. Following the Conference, Student Ambassadors and teachers will have the option of taking a complimentary guided tour of the Nationality Rooms. The Conference is limited to 350 student leaders — usually 5-15 students per participating school. Further details will be available in the spring term.

Student Ambassador Program Resources
Click here for the latest information about this program. Other resources can be found by clicking here.

Please contact Amiena Mahsoob, Deputy Director, Education Programs, at amiena@worldpittsburgh.org for more information.

 

Brian Michael Jenkins Senior Advisor, RAND Corporation
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
The Long Shadow of 9/11: America’s Response to Terrorism

Brian Michael Jenkins
Senior Advisor
RAND Corporation

September 14, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Duquesne Club, 325 Sixth Avenue, Pittsburgh

On September 11, 2001, the deadliest terrorist attack in history resulted in the loss of nearly 3,000 lives and drastically altered the world in which we live today. The response to the attacks led to the invasion of Afghanistan, the reorganization of the intelligence community, and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security. It changed the way we travel, the way we view war, and the value we place on security. Now, a decade later, what impact has America’s response to international terrorism had on the country and world?

Join terrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins for a discussion of the legacy of America’s response to 9/11. What lessons have we learned in the last ten years? What are future strategies in combating terrorism? How has 9/11 changed us as Americans?

Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Adviser to the president of RAND, initiated RAND’s research on terrorism in 1972. A prolific writer and commentator, he is one of the nation’s foremost experts on terrorism, and the author of “Will Terrorists Go Nuclear?” and the forthcoming “Stray Dogs and Virtual Armies: Radicalization and Recruitment to Jihadist Terrorism in the United States Since 9/11” (September 2011, RAND Corporation). In anticipation of the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, Jenkins spearheaded the RAND effort to take stock of America’s policy reactions and give thoughtful consideration to future strategy. That effort is presented in a new book, “The Long Shadow of 9/11: America’s Response to Terrorism”.

In 1996, President Clinton appointed Jenkins to the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. From 1999 to 2000, he served as Adviser to the National Commission on Terrorism and in 2000 was appointed to the U.S. Comptroller General’s Advisory Board. He is a Research Associate at the Mineta Transportation Institute, where he directs research on protecting surface transportation against terrorist attacks.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 12, 2011 will be charged.Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

Thomas M. Sanderson Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats Project Center for Strategic and International Studies
Public Policy Discussion and Luncheon
Remembering 9/11: The Future of Al Qaeda

Thomas M. Sanderson
Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Transnational Threats Project
Center for Strategic and International Studies

September 8, 2011

12:00-1:45 p.m.

Rivers Club, 301 Grant Street, Pittsburgh

The death of Osama bin Laden in the spring of 2011 brought with it a sigh of relief from many Americans. With wars being waged on two fronts, and thousands of lives lost, the founder of Al Qaeda and mastermind of the September 11 terrorist attacks had finally been caught. However, despite initial relief, bin Laden’s true value to Al Qaeda and the role his death will play in the organization’s future remains unclear. Around the world militant groups, validated and nurtured by Al Qaeda, have become self-sustaining entities that are now threats in their own right. Some argue that regional affiliates, such as Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), are now the most significant terrorist threat facing the United States.

With the tenth anniversary of 9/11 fast approaching, and in light of the recent death of Al Qaeda’s infamous leader, the time is ripe to discuss the future of Al Qaeda in the years ahead. What impact will bin Laden’s death have upon the future of the Al Qaeda terror network? What have we learned about terrorist organizations over the last ten years, and how can we better prevent attacks in the future?

Thomas Sanderson is deputy director and senior fellow in the CSIS Transnational Threats Project. During 13 years of counterterrorism experience, he has conducted field work across more than 50 nations, engaging all manner of sources, including extremists, insurgents, foreign intelligence, nongovernmental organizations, and academics. Sanderson has published in The Economist, New York Times, Washington Post, West Point CTC Sentinel, and Harvard Asia Pacific Review. Sanderson holds a B.A. from Wheaton College in Massachusetts and an MALD in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University.

Costs

$45
-World Affairs Council Members

$60
-Non-Member

$360
-Table of Eight (8)

Participants must register to attend. No-shows and cancellations after September 1, 2011 will be charged. Please advise in advance of any dietary restrictions.

This event is closed. For information about this event, please call Melanie Gulasy at 412-281-7970.

Download a PDF description by clicking here!

 

WorldQuest 2011
8th Annual WorldQuest Trivia Competition

October 24, 2011

5:30 p.m.: Check In
6:00 p.m.: Let the Games Begin!

Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Q: What is the official language of Angola?

1) Dutch
2) English
3) French
4) Portuguese

If you think you can answer this question, you might have what it takes to be a WorldQuest champion! Find out by competing in this year’s 8th Annual 2011 WorldQuest Competition.

Join us for a fun evening of food, drinks, prizes, unique networking opportunities, and friendly competition. Show off your knowledge of the world and help support the work of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh. John Denny, The Hillman Company, will be the MC for the evening.

This year we’re shaking things up! The competition will be held at the Cabaret Theater in Pittsburgh’s Cultural District. The event will feature teams of four to accommodate more teams at a cost-friendly rate. In addition to competing for prizes, participants will have an opportunity to enter a raffle to win an exciting prize! All proceeds for this event go to support the Council’s over 100 annual events reaching the region’s secondary schools and professional community.

Raffles and Prizes!

This year we have a number of exciting prizes that will be awarded to our first, second, and third place winners! We will be featuring prizes from the Pittsburgh CLO, PIttsburgh Public Theater, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Pittsburgh Opera, The Carlton, Venture Outdoors, Pavement, The Sharp Edge, Legume, Habitat, Round Corner Cantina, Rivers Club, Nine on Nine, and The Porch.

In addition, you can enter our raffle for a chance to win two Steelers tickets to an upcoming game, or one of two $500 Deltatravel vouchers!

What are you waiting for? Register today!

Start Studying Now!

Use this link for the 2010 WorldQuest questions and answers (PowerPoint).

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to see postings of our practice questions.

What are you waiting for? Register your team today!

Not interested in competing? This year, for the first time, you can watch WorldQuest from the “Cheering Section” and support a team of your choice.

  • Team of 4: $120
  • Single Competitor: $30 (Those registered as single competitors will be placed in teams of 4 on the day of the competition).
  • Cheering Section: $30

Dinner included in the ticket price. Cash bar.

When registering a team, please include the team name, identify the team captain, and include the names of the other team members. Pre-payment is required for all players and teams.

Online registration is closed. If you would like to attend, please contact Caitlin Berczik at 412-281-1259.

WorldQuest 2011 Sponsorship and Donor Opportunities

We are looking for sponsors who will also field one or more teams. This year's sponsorship opportunities include:

Bronze: $500

• One team of 4 competitors
• Table for organizational materials
• Recognition in all event materials and signage

Silver: $1,000

• One team of 4 competitors
• Table for organizational materials
• Recognition in all event materials and signage
• Admittance for 2 to the “Cheering Section.”
• Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.

Gold: $2,500

• Two teams of 4 competitors
• Table for organizational materials
• Recognition in all event materials and signage
• Admittance for 4 to the “Cheering Section.”
• Free table of 8 at an upcoming World Affairs Council luncheon.
• One Corporate Level membership to the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh.

Please contact Caitlin Berczik, at 412-281-1259, or email caitlin@worldpittsburgh.org for more information.

A special thank you to our 2011 sponsors.

Please click on the logos below to visit our generous sponsors.

SILVER SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS

Brother's Brother

A special thank you to our 2011 prize donors.